D-Link DIR-879 AC1900 Wi-Fi Router review – CNET

Considering the fact that even the fastest Wi-Fi clients (like laptops, tablets or smartphones) on the market have a capped Wi-Fi speed of 1,300Mbps (no device on the market currently is capable of anything more), purchasing a top-tier router, like one that supports AC5400 or AC2400 speed standards, will not likely bring you any speed benefits.

Considering the fact that even the fastest Wi-Fi clients (like laptops, tablets or smartphones) on the market have a capped Wi-Fi speed of 1,300Mbps (no device on the market currently is capable of anything more), purchasing a top-tier router, like one that supports AC5400 or AC2400 speed standards, will not likely bring you any speed benefits. The D-Link EXO DIR-879 is an AC1900 router, meaning that as far as real-world performance goes, it’s as fast as you can get, until devices with faster Wi-Fi standards become available. (Read more about Wi-Fi speeds here.)

The EXO is part of a new line of routers from D-Link with a new orange-and-black design and collapsible non-detachable antennas. The look is pleasing to my network world-weary eyes. With four Gigabit LAN ports and one Gigabit WAN port on the back, and four collapsible antennas on the sides, the DIR-879 also nails it on practicality. However, with no USB port or SD card slot, which would allow you to easily share a drive with everyone on your network, you’ll instead need to connect that drive to a computer on the network.

In testing the router supplied a sustained Wi-Fi speed — on the 5GHz band — of more than 635Mbps at close range, beating all other AC1900 routers I’ve tested. Farther out at about 75 feet (with one wall in between) it still averaged out at some 435Mbps. Even on the slower the 2.4GHz band, the router put up some good numbers compared to its peers, registering 136Mbps and 74Mbps at close and long range, respectively. The router had a long maximum range, too, topping out at about 130 feet in a residential setting before I lost the signal. It also passed our 48-hour Wi-Fi stress test without once disconnecting.

It doesn’t always deliver maximum speeds and ranges, however. As with all routers, I tested the DIR-879’s two Wi-Fi bands (2.4GHz and 5GHz) as two separate Wi-Fi networks. However by default, the router combines these two bands into a single Wi-Fi network via a feature called “Smart Connect.” In this mode its Wi-Fi speed was overall noticeably slower than what I mentioned above, most likely because the router pick compatibility over performance. That said, if you want to get the best performance out of the router, I suggest logging into its Web interface and turn off the Smart Connect feature.

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