Updated: Google Project Fi: What you need to know about Google’s cell network

Google Project Fi: what is it?

Update: Google’s Project Fi now covers more ground than ever as it has added U.S. Cellular to its list of network partners. It’s the country’s fifth largest carrier, and boosts the service’s coverage, which previously relied only on T-Mobile and Sprint.

Google Project Fi: what is it?

Update: Google’s Project Fi now covers more ground than ever as it has added U.S. Cellular to its list of network partners. It’s the country’s fifth largest carrier, and boosts the service’s coverage, which previously relied only on T-Mobile and Sprint.

Original article follows below.

Google has its hands in a lot of pots, and the search company just added wireless service to that list.

In the US, mobile contracts are the realm of disliked-but-tolerated companies like AT&T, Verizon, T-Mobile, Sprint and others. But now that Google – a company notably less disliked than these carriers – has joined the fray.

Google has officially launched with Project Fi (yes, that’s the name), a mobile virtual network operated on the backs of Sprint, T-Mobile, and now U.S. Cellular’s LTE networks and Wi-Fi hotspots.

You probably have a lot of questions about it, so read on. We’ll tell you what there is to know so far.

What is Google Project Fi

Project Fi is a new wireless service that Google is launching to offer mobile service directly to users.

The most innovative aspect of Google Fi is its pricing: Google is charging $20 (about £13, AU$25) per month for talk, text, Wi-Fi tethering, and international coverage in 120+ countries, then an additional $10 (about £6, AU$12) per GB of data each month.

For example, a plan with 3GB of data costs $50 (about £33, AU$64) per month. However, if you don’t use all that data, Google will partially refund the money you already paid. So if you only used 1.4 of your 3GB, Google says, you’ll get $16 (about £10, AU$20) back.

What’s better than rollover data? Rollover cash, of course.

Being a mobile virtual network operator (MVNO) means Google essentially licenses network infrastructure from other carriers. There are other companies that do this, like Straight Talk, which TechRadar explored in-depth. Straight Talk offers customers phone plans that work off of other carriers’ networks.

Google is doing the same, making itself the middleman between customers and carriers. So although your Project Fi phone will use T-Mobile, Sprint and U.S. Cellular LTE services, you’ll only ever have to deal with Google.

The company says your device will automatically hop among the available networks and Wi-Fi hotspots depending on which has the best connection. Google counts over a million free, open Wi-Fi hotspots in the US as part of its network.

When you’re connected to Wi-Fi networks, Google encryption keeps you secure, the company says. And you’ll transition seamlessly between Wi-Fi and LTE, even in the middle of a call.

Many of these details turned up originally in an app discovered in an unofficial firmware image released to testers for Google’s Nexus 6 flagship. Android Police detailed the app, which described many of the features and functions of Project Fi.

The app itself might turn out to be important, but Google has yet to mention if officially. According to that original report, though, it seems it will let you pay bills, check your plans and more.

It looks like users may be able to activate new service and request and transfer new numbers within the app, which is more than most carriers let you do. But we won’t know more until Google discusses it.

Availability and supported devices
Where it will be available

Google’s Project Fi is starting in the US only for now, although Google could theoretically launch it anywhere that carriers are willing to partner with it.

You can sign up for an invite to try it out, though users can find out if Project Fi is available in their area using this map.

But it seems availability is pretty wide, as there’s no reason Fi shouldn’t work wherever there’s Sprint, T-Mobile and/or U.S. Cellular service.

What devices will support it

Google has revealed that Project Fi is available on its Nexus 6, Nexus 5X or Nexus 6P flagship.

You’ll also be able to make calls and send texts from your tablet or laptop if it supports Google Hangouts because your phone number will be stored in the cloud. Now that’s pretty cool.

What it means for carriers

Google had to partner with traditional wireless carriers for this service, but it could still give those companies a run for their money by being more affordable, flexible and friendly than them.

That’s often been Google’s M.O., and although it hasn’t always been successful the company has a reputation for disrupting these traditional spaces. One need only look at the positive buzz around Google Fiber, a service that’s only available in a handful of US cities.

Project Fi looks like it might turn out the same thanks to versatile service, easy payments and more flexibility than what any other wireless service offers.

This won’t be the first time the wireless industry has been forced to step up its game to compete with a new threat – just look at all the positive changes T-Mobile’s “Un-carrier” campaign has catalyzed – but with Google at the helm this could prove to be a major shake-up.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *