Photos of canceled Surface Mini show a very different Microsoft tablet

Remember the mythical Surface Mini? The smaller incarnation of Microsoft’s famous slate which was, at one time, expected to emerge at the end of 2014, but ended up being canceled? Well, prototype devices were certainly built, and some images and details on the Mini have just been dug up.

Remember the mythical Surface Mini? The smaller incarnation of Microsoft’s famous slate which was, at one time, expected to emerge at the end of 2014, but ended up being canceled? Well, prototype devices were certainly built, and some images and details on the Mini have just been dug up.

As to what the Surface Mini looked like, you can (obviously) see that in the images here, which come courtesy of Windows Central, who also spilled details on the compact device.

According to the tech site, Microsoft’s Mini came housed in a soft ‘felt-like’ case material, unsurprisingly with a built-in kickstand which offered three different positions.

That kickstand is pretty much the same as the one used on the Surface Pro 3 tablet (in fact, Windows Central theorizes that Microsoft probably took this design from the Surface Mini, and used it in the Surface 3 which came out the following year).

Apparently the idea with the soft case material – and indeed the overall design – was to make the Surface Mini feel like a book, pitching itself as a note-taking device. Users could sling the Surface Pen through a pen loop attached to the kickstand and the large bezel gave plenty of room to hold the device while scrawling away on it.

It was supposed to be a compact digital notebook, in other words, which came with the Surface Pen (the same stylus tech that was introduced in the Surface Pro 3, in fact) – and no Type Cover (the detachable keyboard partner of the rest of the Surface range).

Slate specs

The core specs of the never-released-tablet include an 8-inch screen (as was pegged by rumor mongers at the time) with a resolution of 1440 x 1080, driven by a Qualcomm Snapdragon 800 CPU (with Adreno 330 integrated graphics) along with 1GB of system RAM (ouch on the memory front).

It also ran with dual-band Wi-Fi along with 32GB of storage, and as for the operating system, it ran Windows RT 8.1.

Clearly then, there were a lot of headwinds against this machine: the reed-thin 1GB of system memory, the ever-popular Windows RT (ahem), and some of the design elements like the thick bezel aren’t exactly aesthetically pleasing.

That said, according to Windows Central, the Surface Mini is very comfortable to hold in the hands.

But this small slate getting binned isn’t really a surprise when you consider some of those downsides. It’s likely Microsoft didn’t believe the Surface Mini had enough selling points to make it a tempting proposition for consumers.

We very much doubt, in this case, that Microsoft called it wrong.

Image Credits: Windows Central

If you feel like you missed out, check out our list of best Windows tablets

Fitbit smartwatch may have to launch without an app store

Fitbit is pinning a lot of hope in its first ever smartwatch as interest in its fitness trackers range has begun to dwindle, but it looks like the launch may either be delayed or be missing a major feature of the wearable.

Fitbit is pinning a lot of hope in its first ever smartwatch as interest in its fitness trackers range has begun to dwindle, but it looks like the launch may either be delayed or be missing a major feature of the wearable.

The Fitbit smartwatch has been rumored for a few years and it’s thought the company acquired Pebble last year to gain talent to ramp up work on the watch, but a new report suggests the company is struggling to get a Fitbit app store ready for the expected launch date.

Bloomberg spoke to sources familiar with the product that claim a third-party app store is proving more difficult than originally expected for the company.

The wait continues

It means the Fitbit smartwatch may have to launch without a third-party app store, but that will likely limit the functionality of the wearable when it’s first released. Fitbit may instead decide to delay the launch of the watch.

Fitbit disagrees with the report though and provided a statement that said third-party apps are “on track”.

The statement also says any claims the developer program is struggling are false.

Bloomberg’s report suggests the final watch will be capable of mobile payments as well as having music integration. Rumors of a Spotify tie-in with the Fitbit watch look to have dried up after talks between the two companies have broken down.

The sources also claim the company is looking to release follow up devices to the Fitbit Charge 2 and Fitbit Blaze ranges within the next year as well as some improvements to the Wi-Fi scales made by Fitbit.

Best Fitbit 2017 – here are the best products of Fitbit’s current range

Extensive Low Power Wireless Networks Report 2017-2027: Focus on Technologies, Markets, Opportunities

This report gives an independent and comprehensive analysis of the wireless networking industry covering a range of technologies, using both licensed and unlicensed spectrum to communicate. The report includes over 120 companies working in this space from across the value chain.

This report gives an independent and comprehensive analysis of the wireless networking industry covering a range of technologies, using both licensed and unlicensed spectrum to communicate. The report includes over 120 companies working in this space from across the value chain. Primary research has been conducted based on primary interviews with network operators, semiconductor manufacturers, licensing companies and device manufacturers. Low Power Wide Area Networks (LPWAN) for the Internet of Things have developed over the last four years and networks are being deployed at a dramatic rate, across the world and an interesting industry has emerged transmitting small packets of data, primarily from sensors using unlicensed spectrum. However, cellular operators have developed a new class of licensed spectrum suitable for similar applications, the large network infrastructure that already exists for such operators means a global IoT network can be launched much faster than unlicensed LPWAN providers building such infrastructure themselves.

This emerging trend is in part driven by government regulation in applications such as connected utility meters and smart city infrastructure while industrial applications in agriculture and asset tracking are helping industries gain value from the data produced. Over the next decade more than 12 billion devices will be connected to such networks.

These form part of a 10 year forecast of deployment as well as hardware and subscription market values. The report contains detailed profiles of all key players across this ecosystem.

Key Topics Covered:

1. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
1.1. What is a wireless network?
1.2. What has led to the age of IoT?
1.3. Industries targeting IoT
1.4. Hurdles to mass rollout of IoT infrastructure
1.5. Choosing the right connectivity option
1.6. Different networks suit different applications
1.7. Different network types have different strengths
1.8. What is LPWAN?
1.9. Two main use cases for LPWAN
1.10. Interest in LPWAN has grown dramatically since 2015
1.11. Key players providing LPWAN technology
1.12. LPWAN Providers at a glance
1.13. Is 5G the future for IoT?
1.14. Sensors in the smart home
1.15. Sensors in the smart city
1.16. LPWAN in precision agriculture
1.17. The real value for LPWAN lies in subscriptions & services
1.18. Report outcomes

2. INTRODUCTION TO THE INTERNET OF THINGS
2.1. A brief history of the internet
2.2. An internet made of things
2.3. The Internet of Things is about getting value out of data
2.4. Different industries have different focus
2.5. Five ways IoT is creating opportunities
2.6. What is a smart device?
2.7. Connecting something to the internet does not make it smart
2.8. Key definitions used in wireless networks
2.9. Important business choices for IoT companies

3. NETWORKING DEVICES THROUGH THE INTERNET OF THINGS
3.1. Safe communication using radio frequency
3.2. IoT devices produce small amounts of data
3.3. Large scale IoT projects have specific connectivity needs
3.4. Addressing the IP address shortage
3.5. 6LowPAN is an extension of IPv6
3.6. Low bitrate signals travel longer distances
3.7. Ultra narrow band (UNB) data transmission
3.8. Choosing the right network for the right application
3.9. LPWAN technology developed in the 1980s
3.10. Key features of LPWAN connectivity
3.11. Dealing with interference in an LPWAN system
3.12. Worldwide radio spectrum availability
3.13. Use of licenced and unlicensed spectrum
3.14. Different spectrum areas support different applications
3.15. Cellular communication on licenced spectrum
3.16. Global use of unlicensed spectrum.
3.17. A long term future for unlicensed spectrum IoT devices?
3.18. Spectrum sharing as the next model for licensed spectrum?
3.19. Relative Project Costs for Cellular and LPWAN for new Deployments
3.20. Licensed and unlicensed protocols
3.21. Networking using a mesh topology
3.22. Power management in mesh networks
3.23. Networking using a scatternet topology
3.24. Networking using a star topology
3.25. Security considerations for IoT networks

4. KEY PLAYERS IN THE WPAN ECOSYSTEM
4.1. The WPAN ecosystem is well established, but evolving
4.2. Bluetooth 5-the next WPAN system?
4.3. Bluetooth
4.2 vs Bluetooth 5
4.4. Cutting through the hype on Bluetooth 5
4.5. Three ZigBee specifications
4.6. Thread networking protocol
4.7. Interoperability in WPAN systems
4.8. Comparison of WLAN networking protocols
4.9. Applications of short range networks
4.10. Alliances lead to operability issues

5. COMPREHENSIVE ANALYSIS OF THE LPWAN ECOSYSTEM
5.1. How many competing LPWAN technologies?
5.2. The ‘five 10s’ of LPWAN connectivity
5.3. Terminology used in LPWAN architecture
5.4. Choosing an LPWAN: a simple flow chart
5.5. Ingenu worldwide coverage
5.6. LoRa Vs LoRaWAN
5.7. LoRaWAN worldwide coverage
5.8. Transmission over Chirp spread spectrum (CSS)
5.9. LoRaWAN system architecture
5.10. LoRaWAN protocol architecture
5.11. Three classifications of LoRaWAN networks
5.12. The Things Network
5.13. Global reach of The Thing’s Network community
5.14. Applications and Limitations of LoRaWAN
5.15. Sigfox architecture
5.16. Global Sigfox coverage
5.17. Sigfox local operators by region
5.18. Classification of Weightless technologies
5.19. NB-IoT takes aim at LPWAN
5.20. Cellular operators trialling or deploying NB-IoT
5.21. Huawei & Vodafone leading the way in NB-IoT
5.22. NB-IoT Forum serves the needs of companies in the ecosphere
5.23. ARM backs NB-IoT
5.24. NB-IoT trials
5.25. The first commercial NB-IoT network launches in Europe
5.26. Planned NB-IoT networks in 2017
5.27. Inside the Vodafone NB-IoT open lab
5.28. Hurdles to NB-IoT rollout
5.29. Interoperability is holding NB-IoT back
5.30. Companies Partnering with Huawei on NB-IoT
5.31. LTE-M rolls out in America
5.32. LTE-M vs NB-IoT
5.33. LTE-M could kickstart the smartwatch industry
5.34. Key drivers for each LPWAN provider
5.35. The IoT battlefield: licensed vs unlicensed networks
5.36. Comparison of LPWAN capabilities
5.37. Visual comparison of LPWAN technologies
5.38. Defined battery life with LPWAN technology
5.39. Firmware upgrades over LPWAN
5.40. IoT networks designed for less economically developed countries
5.41. Will 5G make an impact in IoT?
5.42. 5G for the automotive sector
5.43. Unlicensed spectrum LPWAN making some impact in China
5.44. Roaming capabilities of each LPWAN technology
5.45. Total cost of LPWAN ownership
5.46. Porters five force analysis of the LPWAN industry

6. HARDWARE ENABLING WIRELESS CONNECTIVITY
6.1. LPWAN offers big opportunities for the chip industry
6.2. Licensing requirements for LPWAN technologies
6.3. Price comparison of LPWAN module costs
6.4. Semiconductor manufacturers announcing chipsets for NB-IoT
6.5. Huawei driving NB-IoT hardware growth
6.6. Comprehensive database of LPWAN silicon manufacturers
6.7. Key players providing WPAN modules & chipsets
6.8. Recent acquisitions in the semiconductor industry
6.9. Linking LPWAN and WPAN communication methods
6.10. Versatile chips are a game changer in the smart home
6.11. MEMS enabling the miniaturisation of chemical sensors
6.12. Sensor prototyping boards demonstrate demand from star-ups

7. INDOOR WIRELESS NETWORK USE CASES
7.1. A smart home should be a place where
7.2. Interest in the smart home is growing
7.3. A slow uptake in smart home devices so far
7.4. Control System- Fully Connected IoT system
7.5. Trends in smart homes
7.6. Locks in a smart home
7.7. Connected thermostats and energy meters
7.8. Motion sensors
7.9. Connected lights
7.10. Indoor air quality monitoring
7.11. Home utilities were the beginning of LPWAN
7.12. Home metering is LPWANs biggest market
7.13. Smart metering will peak in 2020
7.14. Enabling long range mesh networks for utilities
7.15. IKEA pledges support for ZigBee
7.16. ZigBee establishing itself as the smart home network
7.17. Mesh networking Bluetooth devices indoors
7.18. Wi-Fi routers are adopting multiple forms of communication to become the centre of the home
7.19. Temperature and humidity monitoring
7.20. Wireless indoor air quality monitoring
7.21. Fuel tank monitoring for home energy
7.22. Communication through sound in the smart home

8. WIRELESS CONNECTIVITY IN SMART CITIES
8.1. Where are the smart cities?
8.2. Four factors that contribute to a smart city
8.3. Smart city mesh networks
8.4. The Wi-Sun alliance
8.5. Silver Spring networks in smart cities
8.6. LPWAN trends in smart cities
8.7. Smart City Trends: Parking
8.8. Car parking assisted by IoT
8.9. Smart City Trends: Waste
8.10. Smart city trends: street lights
8.11. Libelium nodes utilising LPWAN technology
8.12. Case Study: San Diego
8.13. LPWAN deployment across India
8.14. Internet connected fire hydrants
8.15. People as sensor nodes
8.16. LPWAN on a university campus
8.17. Canal systems in the Netherlands make use of LPWAN technology
8.18. LPWAN network coverage in Australia and New Zealand
8.19. LPWAN in contingency planning

9. ASSET TRACKING USING IOT
9.1. Transmission on the Internet of moving Things
9.2. Traditional asset tracking methods are not ideal for IoT devices
9.3. Geolocation with LoRaWAN
9.4. Sigfox launches asset tracking platform
9.5. RTLS combining multiple transmission methods
9.6. Bluetooth well established in indoor location tracking
9.7. Asset tracking across indoor and outdoor space
9.8. LPWAN in the home
9.9. NB-IoT for theft management
9.10. Bicycle sharing enabled through NB-IoT
9.11. Medical asset tracking
9.12. Internet enabled pallet tracking
9.13. SAYME launch Sigfox based tracking modules
9.14. Asset tracking and a lot more
9.15. LPWAN as a GPS back up – case studies
9.16. Tracking shipping containers
9.17. NB-IoT in wearables
9.18. Child & pet tracking with IoT
9.19. Animal tracking in national parks

10. WIRELESS NETWORKS ENABLING SMART AGRICULTURE
10.1. LPWAN technologies see major success in agriculture vertical
10.2. Crop monitoring using LPWAN networks
10.3. Agricultural monitoring in New Zealand
10.4. Verizon enter agricultural space
10.5. Smart vineyards enabled through IoT
10.6. Connected Kiwi production
10.7. A smart gardening system
10.8. Animal tracking across African plains
10.9. Sustainable fisheries with IoT
10.10. Sensor networks monitoring forest fires
10.11. Wireless sensor networks enabling fire fighters

11. MARKET FORECASTS

For more information about this report visit https://www.researchandmarkets.com/research/g3pfr9/low_power

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Laura Wood, Senior Manager
press@researchandmarkets.com

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Smart-lighting India: In conversation with Harsh Chitale – CEO of Philips Lighting, South Asia

The lighting infrastructure in India is changing rapidly alongside the greater digitisation drive India is going through. Lightbulbs used to be use-and-throw products but today we have advanced bulbs which are both energy efficient and come with advance features such as remote management.

The lighting infrastructure in India is changing rapidly alongside the greater digitisation drive India is going through. Lightbulbs used to be use-and-throw products but today we have advanced bulbs which are both energy efficient and come with advance features such as remote management. These light sources also known as smart lights are now moving beyond its functional aspect and making inroads into our lifestyle. Latest advances also make it easier to light-smart your home on top of your exiting lighting arrangement.

However, the greater India isn’t yet moving from the standard Rs 10 incandescent lamps to smart lighting devices for houses, offices, and cities. The overall penetration of smart lighting in India is still at a nascent stage with a meagre five per cent presence in the lighting industry.

Rural India still favors conventional power guzzlers over CFLs and LED lightbulbs. And it’s purely because of affordability. But clearly a trend is setting in with awareness for efficient lighting going up. Plus, with the Government undertaking several programmes for LEDification of the country and phasing out incandescent bulbs, the country appears to be ready to embrace smart lights on a scale.

Philips Lighting has a large R&D base and factories here in India and almost 95% of what they sell in India is made in India. The company, which is betting big on its smart lighting solutions, has its smart light product-line called Philips Hue currently available in India.

To understand the bigger picture, we caught with up Harsh Chitale, the CEO of Philips Lighting, South Asia.

What’s the current state of lighting infrastructure in India across homes, offices and public spaces?

We have seen a significant increase in the speed of digital transformation of lighting over the past two years. With the advent of LED lighting, the industry has transformed from analogue to digital as LED lighting allows users to control, monitor and measure lighting output. This transformation is taking place across public, home and professional lighting.

India is home to the world’s youngest population that is increasingly smartphone savvy and an early adopter of the latest technology trends available globally. We have witnessed a growing awareness about IoT and connected lighting amongst consumers. Philips has launched Hue for tech-savvy population who are keen on enhancing their lifestyle using technology. The dominant share of LED in consumer space is 50-50.

As India’s business landscape matures, expectations of a new generation of employees from their workplaces have increased. These developments have led to the emergence of smart and connected offices, where the Internet of Things drives new ways to collaborate, innovate and socialize.

More than 75% of lights that are now sold are LED lights. Thanks to Smart City programme that’s underway and the government’s drive towards energy efficiency. More than 75% of lighting in the B2G is now LED. However, the penetration of smart lighting still less than 10%, but it is increasing rapidly.

What trends do you see in Indian market when it comes to smart lighting for home users?

Over the years, we have witnessed a considerable shift in the behavior pattern of our target consumers in the Home lighting segment. Given the evolved lifestyle and preferences of consumers, lighting has moved way beyond its functional aspect. Today, lighting has become a key consideration for customers planning their overall home decor.

Connected LED lighting has made it possible for consumers to personalize their lighting experience at home. It allows users to seamlessly integrate their lighting systems with their Wi-Fi network and control its operation through their smartphones.

Increasingly, consumers are also becoming conscious of the effect of lighting on their overall health and well-being. Light has a profound impact on regulating the human body’s 24-hour circadian rhythm, playing a critical role in how people wake up and fall asleep and also affects their mood, behavior, alertness and routines.

Our Philips Hue White Ambiance range can help users get out of bed and start their day feeling refreshed. Using the” wake up” routine, the light brightness increases gradually mimicking the effect of sunrise, helping users wake up naturally.

Conventional lighting is still all over! Why aren’t people going for energy efficient alternatives as yet?

Affordability is a big part of it. As we know conventional bulbs are still cheaper, and there is a large section of our society that cannot afford bulbs which are expensive. So, in India where conventional bulbs will cater to needs of one segment, LED or more efficient bulbs will cater to the second segment and then there is more mature, technically progressive segment, which is open to adopting these newer technologies. All three segments will co-exist, however as the technology matures, the share of the third segment will see a boost.

For instance, LED is growing at a very high pace; over 100% year-on-year for us. Smart lighting is growing at even faster pace while conventional category is gradually declining.

Beyond affordability, do you think the lack of right level of awareness is to blame for the sluggish pace of adoption?

One segment of the society –which is the digitally active and connected segment, is well aware of smart lighting and their propensity to buy is increasing. It is not different from any other smart technology penetration in the country.

For example, ten years back when smartphone came in, it was a novelty; it didn’t even exist. And then it started catching up and now more than 25% of phones sold are smartphones. Similarly, the penetration wave is going to come to lighting, and it is coming at a faster pace than the phones. It took smartphones ten years to go from 0-25% penetration today, whereas in lighting it may take five to seven years to attain the same kind of penetration.

Is India on track to leverage this connected-lighting opportunity given the benefits it brings to table?

Connected lighting is the next big thing in lighting. Every technology comes across a point of inflection, which happens to be the right time for it. LED has been in talk for many years till that inflection came. LED was used for general lighting purposes for the first time in 1994. However, they did not become popular due to certain limitations at that time. Then there came the inflection following some technology development, cost reduction, and above all, the acceptance – all three put together constitute consumers’ side. And when these three come together, we can clearly observe what can happen. We envisage that the same thing would ensue in connected lighting.

When it comes to LED, it is about energy-efficiency; while connected lighting is a concept that encompasses a gamut of benefits bringing a lot of other areas under its purview. For instance, it would offer better environment for children to study, induce better healing of a patient, enhance productivity, makes the city safer, reduces the real estate cost, etc., all these come bundled with the smart connected lighting towards which we are striding forward.

While the government’s initiatives have increased awareness about LED lighting, the adoption of connected lighting will depend on the acceptance from consumers.

Under the street-light programme, over 21 lakh street lights have been upgraded with LED lights across the country! Your take.

The government is doing a big enablement. Two years back, Prime Minister announced ‘Prakash Path’ programme, which is aimed to move from basic lighting to LED lighting. Government is driving this through various government procurement mechanisms.

With smart city plan underway, where hundreds of smart cities are planned, we’re going to see connected smart lighting for streets being implemented. In some cases, smart connected lighting is being used for architectural lighting—for parks and tunnels.

We appreciate the Indian Government’s efforts towards LEDification of the country with programmes such as Street Lighting National Programme (SLNP). Besides their energy savings potential, the cost of maintenance for LEDs is much lower and the quality of light is also better. Moreover, LED solutions such as Solar Powered LED street lights can be installed in both semi-urban and rural areas and offer reliable off-grid lighting. Many states in India have started adopting energy efficient streetlights because of the Street Lighting National Programme and the Smart City initiative of the Indian government, but a lot more needs to be done.

India has more than 5,000 towns and at least 100 large cities and three crore street lights, therefore offering a huge potential for upgrade to energy efficient LED lighting.

Urban populations are growing rapidly and 60 percent of the world’s population are predicted to be living in cities by 2030 with more than 70 billion light points. Lighting will play a significant role in the development of smart cities of the future as it pervades every area of an individual’s life – home, work, on the road and in public places.

The way forward in public street lighting will be connected lighting solutions that allow city administrators to control and monitor lighting remotely. During non-peak hours, the lights can be remotely dimmed to save energy. Similarly, they can be fully illuminated during peak hours or on detecting movement through sensors equipped in street lights.

Some cities in India have taken the lead and already upgraded to connected street lighting. One example is Naya Raipur, the new capital of Chhattisgarh. This city has one of the world’s most modern connected lighting infrastructure that is monitored remotely. The city engineer monitors the infrastructure from his office.

What are Philips Lighting’s top priorities and investment areas moving ahead in 2017?

We have global partnerships with various players who are promoting smart homes. Whether it is Amazon Alexa, Samsung Smart Home technology, or Apple Home Kit; Philips Hue is the only solution that has native connectivity with each of them.

It is the default lighting system that works with each of these systems. We have built-in APIs and connectors into all of these systems. As the smart home accessories like Apple Home Kit, Google Home or Amazon Alexa grows in India, the smart lighting ecosystem will automatically grow.

Connected and smart lighting is one big priority area, and we are investing in it as newer connected lighting systems are getting launched. We’re building our points of sale so that more and more consumers can go and buy from retail stores such as Chroma, Reliance Digital, online through e-commerce, and over 200 light lounges in India.

We’re making sure each of them is equipped with Hue experience zones where consumers can go and experience it. Building out these points of presence, where consumers could go, touch and feel the connected or smart lights, is one area where we are making big investment.

Enhancing consumers’ communications through ATL or digital marketing and continuing to build these partnerships like I mentioned are the three pillars we are working on.

iFLYTEK On-Device Speech Recognition Software Now Available For CEVA’s Ultra-Low Power Audio/Voice DSPs

Ran Soffer, vice president of marketing and corporate development at CEVA, commented: “The combination of iFLYTEK’s software and our audio/voice DSP offers a powerful solution for embedding intelligent voice applications into mass market consumer electronic devices.

Ran Soffer, vice president of marketing and corporate development at CEVA, commented: “The combination of iFLYTEK’s software and our audio/voice DSP offers a powerful solution for embedding intelligent voice applications into mass market consumer electronic devices. We look forward to expanding our relationship as the demand for on-device speech processing continues to grow rapidly.”

CEVA’s family of audio/voice/speech DSPs provide a range of solutions, from ultra-low-power always-listening smart devices, through versatile wireless audio in mobile and hearables, and up to high resolution audio processing in home entertainment and automotive. These audio/voice DSPs are ideal for developing voice-enabled solutions where power consumption and cost are critical. Having powered audio and voice in more than 6 billion devices to date, CEVA’s expertise is unrivalled in the industry. Each CEVA sound processor is supported by market-leading hardware and software development tools, software libraries and the extensive CEVAnet partner ecosystem. For more information, visit http://www.ceva-dsp.com/app/audio-voice-and-speech/.

About iFLYTEK
Established in 1999, iFLYTEK is a national level high-tech enterprise dedicated to the research and development of intelligent speech and language technologies, artificial intelligence, hardware & software applications, and provision of professional services for governments, education sector, financial organizations and other fields. iFLYTEK was listed in the Shenzhen Stock Exchange in 2008 (stock code: 002230). iFLYTEK’s intelligent speech and artificial intelligence technologies such as speech synthesis, speech recognition, speech evaluation, and natural language processing, represents the top level in the world. iFLYTEK has occupied more than 70% of Chinese speech industry market share. Meanwhile, iFLYTEK provides speech core technology for more than 2,000 companies in the whole industry and has launched the world’s first “iFLYTEK voice cloud” platform, which provides intelligent speech interaction capability for mobile internet industry(currently there are more than 80,000 project partners and more than 700 million end-users, promoting the application of intelligent speech and artificial intelligence technology into education, mobile phones, automotive, appliance and other industries, serving millions of households. For more information, visit http://www.iflytek.com/en/.

About CEVA, Inc.
CEVA is the leading licensor of signal processing IP for a smarter, connected world. We partner with semiconductor companies and OEMs worldwide to create power-efficient, intelligent and connected devices for a range of end markets, including mobile, consumer, automotive, industrial and IoT. Our ultra-low-power IPs for vision, audio, communications and connectivity include comprehensive DSP-based platforms for LTE/LTE-A/5G baseband processing in handsets, infrastructure and machine-to-machine devices, advanced imaging, computer vision and deep learning for any camera-enabled device, audio/voice/speech and ultra-low power always-on/sensing applications for multiple IoT markets. For connectivity, we offer the industry’s most widely adopted IPs for Bluetooth (low energy and dual mode), Wi-Fi (802.11 a/b/g/n/ac up to 4×4) and serial storage (SATA and SAS). Visit us at www.ceva-dsp.com and follow us on Twitter, YouTube and LinkedIn.

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SOURCE CEVA, Inc.

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Samsung really wants your kitchen appliances to be smart – CNET

Samsung has placed a big bet that its customers want their large kitchen appliances to be connected to the internet. The company announced this week that all of the appliances in the brand’s next Chef Collection line will have Wi-Fi connectivity.

Samsung has placed a big bet that its customers want their large kitchen appliances to be connected to the internet. The company announced this week that all of the appliances in the brand’s next Chef Collection line will have Wi-Fi connectivity. That means you’ll be able to check in on and control your stove, refrigerator, dishwasher, cooktop or oven through an app on your iOS or Android device.

The Chef Collection appliances will be available in the fall. The company said it would release the prices of the products closer to the line’s release.

“Samsung has been listening to a new generation of state-of-the-art homeowners to understand their priorities to insure Chef Collection meets their needs and wants,” the company said in a statement. “This new home buyer is leading a busy life and looks to connected technology to make life more efficient and simple.”

Samsung has been one of the major manufacturers that has pushed for large kitchen appliances to be a significant part of a smart-home setup. The company recently released new models of its Family Hub refrigerator, the appliance with a tablet built into the door and cameras that give you a live shot of the inside of your refrigerator. And Samsung added Wi-Fi to its Flex-Duo range last year, which let you control your oven and check if you forgot to turn off a burner.

Other manufacturers have also gotten serious when it comes to bringing their large kitchen appliances into the Internet of Things. Companies like Whirlpool, GE and LG have added Wi-Fi connectivity to some of their products and partnered with platforms like Amazon Dash Replenishment Services, Amazon Alexa and Google Home to create automatic ordering of supplies and hands-free controls.

Features of the Chef Collection lineBluetooth-enabled range hoods that automatically turn on with when a cooktop is in use and change fan speeds with a heat sensing feature.
A 42-inch 4-Door Flex refrigerator with a FlexZone compartment that can transition from fridge to freezer depending on your needs.
Wi-Fi-enabled built-in refrigerators will have a camera built in so you can see the contents of your fridge from your device.Ovens with a Flex Duo insert that lets you divide your oven cavity into separate cooking zones.

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Telit and OT-Morpho Partner for Opportunities in the New Era of Device Provisioning on a Global Scale for the Internet of Things

Together, Telit and OT-Morpho will leverage their combined technical expertise as well as their worldwide customer and carrier eco-systems to jumpstart the IoT narrowband cellular economy. The focus will be on streamlining the provisioning and subscription management process for next generation Cat-M and NB-IoT connectivity.

Together, Telit and OT-Morpho will leverage their combined technical expertise as well as their worldwide customer and carrier eco-systems to jumpstart the IoT narrowband cellular economy. The focus will be on streamlining the provisioning and subscription management process for next generation Cat-M and NB-IoT connectivity.

“We are excited to partner with OT-Morpho and collaborate on innovative ways to serve the needs of the IoT market. We believe our new approach will also offer significant advantages to MNO partners – including but not limited to – new market opportunities for services, minimal impact on existing business processes, cost savings on SIMs logistics while maintaining the highest level of security and are working with some early adopters to fully leverage these,” said Oozi Cats, CEO of Telit. “Following the recently announced Telit simWISE offering, this new solution will further target the coming wave of NB-IoT and Low Cat devices enabling a global IoT centric subscription management service, reduce total cost of ownership for end-customers and improve time-to-market for IoT developers.”

“OT-Morpho and Telit see the massive opportunity represented by the IoT market and believe that as key ecosystem players they have a vital role to fulfill in helping MNOs and enterprises roll out their IoT strategies. By streamlining subscription management and by bringing solutions that can enhance the security and integrity of connected devices, we are fulfilling critical industry needs in order for the IoT to reach its full potential,” said Didier Lamouche, CEO of OT-Morpho.

As Telit and OT-Morpho progress into their partnership, the companies plan to announce the details of their solution in the near future, which will enable a wide-scale adoption of cellular technology across billions of devices worldwide.

*NarrowBand IoT(NB-IoT) is a Low Power Wide Area Network (LPWAN) radio technology standard that has been developed to enable a wide range of devices and services to be connected using cellular telecommunications bands.

About Telit
Telit (AIM: TCM), is a global leader in Internet of Things (IoT) enablement. The company offers the industry’s broadest portfolio of integrated products and services for end-to-end IoT deployments – including cellular communication modules in all technologies, GNSS, Wi-Fi, short-to-long range wireless modules, IoT connectivity plans and IoT platform services. Through the IoT Portal, Telit makes IoT onboarding easy, reduces risk, time to market, complexity and costs for asset tracking, remote monitoring and control, telematics, industrial automation and others, across many industries and vertical markets worldwide.

Copyright © 2017 Telit Communications PLC. All rights reserved. Telit and all associated logos are trademarks of Telit Communications PLC in the United States and other countries. Other names used herein may be trademarks of their respective owners.

About OT-Morpho
OT-Morpho is a world leader in digital security & identification technologies with the ambition to empower citizens and consumers alike to interact, pay, connect, commute, travel and even vote in ways that are now possible in a connected world.

As our physical and digital, civil and commercial lifestyles converge, OT-Morpho stands precisely at that crossroads to leverage the best in security and identity technologies and offer customized solutions to a wide range of international clients from key industries, including Financial services, Telecom, Identity, Security and IoT.

With close to €3bn in revenues and more than 14,000 employees, OT-Morpho is the result of the merger between OT (Oberthur Technologies) and Safran Identity & Security (Morpho) completed on 31 May 2017. Temporarily designated by the name “OT-Morpho”, the new company will unveil its new name in September of this year.

For more information:
www.morpho.com and www.oberthur.com
Follow @Safran_Morpho and @OT_TheMcompany on Twitter.

Telit Media Contact:
Leslie Hart
919-415-1510
Leslie.Hart@Telit.com

OT-Morpho Media Contacts:
Isabelle de BUYER: isabelle.de-buyer@morpho.com / T + 33 (0)1 30 20 22 67
Julien TAHMISSIAN: julien.tahmissian@havas.com / T + 33 (0)1 58 47 90 54

To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/telit-and-ot-morpho-partner-for-opportunities-in-the-new-era-of-device-provisioning-on-a-global-scale-for-the-internet-of-things-300482003.html

SOURCE Telit; OT-Morpho

Related Links

http://www.telit.com

Untangle Named to Gartner’s 2017 Magic Quadrant for Unified Threat Management (SMB Multifunction Firewalls)

Untangle believes that recognition by Gartner for the second consecutive year is a reflection of its ability to address the needs of SMB customers and distributed enterprises with network security solutions that are easy to buy, easy to deploy and easy to use.

Untangle believes that recognition by Gartner for the second consecutive year is a reflection of its ability to address the needs of SMB customers and distributed enterprises with network security solutions that are easy to buy, easy to deploy and easy to use. Untangle NG Firewall delivers a comprehensive solution for content filtering, malware and threat protection, secure Wi-Fi, application control, bandwidth optimization, virtual private networks and more. Untangle combines Unified Threat Management (UTM)—to address all of the key network threats—with policy management tools that enable administrators to monitor, manage and shape internet traffic. NG Firewall’s fully customizable, industry-leading reports provide administrators an unprecedented level of insight into what’s happening on their networks across all applications by user, group, time of day and more.

Access to the full report of the June 2017 Magic Quadrant for the Unified Threat Management (SMB Multifunction Firewalls) market is available here.

*Gartner “Magic Quadrant for Unified Threat Management (SMB Multifunction Firewalls)” by Jeremy D’Hoinne, Rajpreet Kaur, Adam Hils, June 2017.

About the Magic Quadrant

Gartner does not endorse any vendor, product or service depicted in its research publications, and does not advise technology users to select only those vendors with the highest ratings or other designation. Gartner research publications consist of the opinions of Gartner’s research organization and should not be construed as statements of fact. Gartner disclaims all warranties, express or implied, with respect to this research, including any warranties of merchantability or fitness for a particular purpose.

About Untangle

Untangle is an innovator in cybersecurity designed specifically for the below-enterprise market, safeguarding businesses, home offices, nonprofits, schools and governmental organizations. Untangle’s integrated suite of software and appliances provides enterprise-grade capabilities and consumer-oriented simplicity to organizations with limited IT resources. Untangle’s award-winning network security solutions are trusted by over 40,000 customers around the world. Untangle is headquartered in San Jose, California. For more information, www.untangle.com.

To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/untangle-named-to-gartners-2017-magic-quadrant-for-unified-threat-management-smb-multifunction-firewalls-300481990.html

SOURCE Untangle Inc.

Related Links

http://www.untangle.com

Internet Of Things (IOT) in Aerospace & Defence Market Forecast 2017-2027

(Logo: http://mma.prnewswire.com/media/523989/Visiongain_Logo.jpg )

This report offers a global forecast, which is then broken down by the following regional and national markets:


North America

– U.S.

(Logo: http://mma.prnewswire.com/media/523989/Visiongain_Logo.jpg )

This report offers a global forecast, which is then broken down by the following regional and national markets:

• North America
– U.S.
– Canada
– Mexico

• Europe
– Germany
– UK
– France
– Italy
– Rest of Europe

• Asia-Pacific

– China
– India
– Japan
– Australia
– Rest of Asia-Pacific

• Latin America

• Middle East & Africa

As well as the following submarkets:

By Component:
• Hardware
• Software
• Services

By Deployment Type:
• On-Premise
• Cloud

By Connectivity:
• Cellular
• Wi-Fi
• Radio Frequency
• SATCOM

By Application:
• Fleet Management
• Medical (Health Monitoring)
• Inventory Management
• Equipment Maintenance
• Analytics
• Security

In order to offer an accurate snapshot of the current market,visiongainhas also profiled the following leading companies:
• Bombardier Inc.
• International Business Machines Corporation (IBM)
• Airbus Group SE
• The Boeing Company
• Northrop Grumman Corporation
• BAE Systems
• SAP SE
• Honeywell International Inc.
• General Electric
• Zodiac Aerospace

With 100+ tables and charts and a total length of over 130 pages, this report is a fantastic opportunity to increase your knowledge of this sector. Porter’s Five Forces analysis, as well as analysis of the drivers and restraints for the overall market, concisely informs you of the major factors affecting this market, whilst visiongain‘s data-rich approach provides greater insight into this market.

To request a report overview of this report please email Sara Peerun at sara.peerun@visiongain.com or call Tel: +44-(0)-20-7336-6100 or click on https://www.visiongain.com/Report/1902/Internet-of-Things-(IoT)-in-Aerospace-Defence-Market-Forecast-2017-2027

List of Companies Mentioned

Abaco Systems

Adobe Systems

Airbus Group SE

Airbus Interiors Services

Airbus ProSky

Ansys Inc.

Autodesk, Inc.

Aviall

B/E Aerospace, Inc.

BAE Systems

Ball Aerospace & Technologies Corporation

Bell Helicopter

BETSOL

Boeing UK

Bombardier Inc.

Bombardier Transport (Holdings) UK Ltd

Bombardier Transport France S.A.S.

Bombardier Transportation GmbH

Capgemini SE

CIMPA

Cognizant Technology Solutions Corporation

Cyient Ltd.

Dassault Systemes

DDC-I, Inc.

Deloitte LLP

Deltek, Inc.

Eurocopter Group

Finmeccanica North America Inc.

General Dynamics Corporation

General Electric

Goodrich Corporation

GS Group

Gulfstream Aerospace Corporation

Honeywell International Inc.

IFS Industrial and Financial Systems AB

Insitu

International Business Machines Corporation (IBM)

Intrinsyc Technologies Corp.

IoT Defense Inc.

Learjet Inc.

Lockheed Martin Corporation

MegaFon

MegaFon PJSC

Metron Aviation

Microsoft Corporation

Mocana Corporation

MTS Group

Navtech

Northrop Grumman Corporation

Pratt & Whitney

PTC Inc.

Pulzze Systems

Raytheon Company

Rolls-Royce Limited

SAP SE

Satair

SIGFOX SA

Snecma SA

Space Exploration Technologies Corp.

Tapestry Solutions Inc.

Textron, N.V.

Thales S.A.

The Boeing Company

The Raytheon Company

Trenton Systems Inc.

United Technologies Corporation

VimpelCom Ltd.

Wind River Systems

Wipro ltd

Zodiac Aerospace

To see a report overview please email Sara Peerun on sara.peerun@visiongain.com

SOURCE Visiongain Ltd

AI enters the hospital room – CNET

Imagine you’re stuck in a hospital bed after having surgery. You can’t even close the window blinds without a nurse’s help. And you can forget about requesting a blanket to take off the chill or getting details on visiting hours when everyone’s busy handling more-pressing matters.

Imagine you’re stuck in a hospital bed after having surgery. You can’t even close the window blinds without a nurse’s help. And you can forget about requesting a blanket to take off the chill or getting details on visiting hours when everyone’s busy handling more-pressing matters.

You feel powerless.

But what if you got what you needed just by saying it? You could instantly open the blinds, find out more about your doctor’s expertise or turn up the room temperature. Sounds great, right? All you’d need is one of today’s digital voice assistants that constantly listen for a request, send your query to the internet and either answer your question or complete a task.

Unfortunately, you can’t do that right now with the current crop of smart assistants — like Apple‘s Siri, Amazon‘s Alexa and Google’s Assistant — because they can’t satisfy hospitals’ privacy and security requirements. Yet according to Bret Greenstein, vice president of IBM‘s Watson Internet of Things platform, some medical staff can spend nearly 10 percent of their time with patients answering questions about lunch, physician credentials and visiting hours. If a smart speaker can answer those questions, doctors and nurses could spend more time on patient care.

It’s why Thomas Jefferson University Hospitals in Philadelphia decided to work with audio giant Harman and IBM’s Watson artificial intelligence technology. Together, they developed smart speakers that will respond to about a dozen commands. When a patient says “Watson,” the speakers can, for instance, play calming sounds and adjust the room’s lighting, thermostat and blinds.

“This is a way for patients to get some simple comfort measures addressed just by speaking,” says Dr. Andrew Miller, associate chief medical officer at the Philadelphia hospital group. “How great is that?”

For the hospital, it’s just the beginning.

Watson, turn on the lights

Like Amazon’s popular Echo speaker, Harman’s JBL clock radio packs smarts that respond to command words it hears spoken.

Jefferson Hospital experimented with Amazon’s popular Echo speaker, but found the hospital couldn’t simultaneously control multiple speakers from one management system. What’s more, the Echo couldn’t access the hospital’s secure Wi-Fi network, and it didn’t have the right “skills,” or capabilities, for a medical environment.

“This is a way for patients to get some simple comfort measures addressed just by speaking. How great is that?”
Dr. Andrew Miller

“It would have done simple things people are used to doing in the home, but not the things we wanted to do,” says Neil Gomes, the hospital’s chief digital officer.

So late last year, Jefferson Hospital started testing five prototype speakers that Harman made using the external casing of a regular JBL cylindrical speaker and components specially designed for artificial intelligence.

The initial trial tested two models. One required patients to press a button to wake up the device, getting around privacy concerns of an ever-listening microphone. The other woke when someone said “Watson,” the name of IBM’s AI technology that won the $1 million first-place prize on “Jeopardy” in 2011.

“The button gives a sense of privacy, but it proved to be very frustrating to users because they had to keep pushing it,” says Greenstein.

The newest speakers, now built into Harman’s round JBL clock radios, rely solely on voice commands. The hospital is testing about 40 of the new speakers, with IBM and Harman tweaking the smarts as they go. The speakers also tie into the hospital’s automated facilities management system, which lets administrators control things like heating, air conditioning and lighting online. That’s a convenience for everyone.

“When my father-in-law was in the hospital, we had to talk to the nurse about adjusting the thermostat,” says Kevin Hague, vice president of technology strategy at Harman. “It was absurd that we had to have an RN come in and figure out on the computer how to adjust the temperature.”

As of this writing, the hospital hadn’t decided if it would stick with “Watson” or go with some other wake-up word, like “Jefferson.”

That’s hospitable

It’s fair to say we’d rather voice assistants do our bidding in a hotel room instead of in a hospital.

Some hotels are exploring that option — and finding that off-the-shelf digital assistants work just fine.

Marriott, for instance, has been testing Apple’s Siri and Amazon’s Alexa at an Aloft Hotel in Boston. The hotel installed iPad tablets and Echo speakers in 10 rooms, letting guests speak commands to control the TV and adjust the lighting. That sounds awfully tempting considering how tough it can be sometimes to figure out which switch does what.

“The room would become an extension to your personal tech,” says Toni Stoeckl, Marriott global brand leader and vice president. “I don’t think we’re there quite yet.”

In the meantime, Jefferson Hospital, Harman and IBM are working on ways to teach their smart speaker to branch out beyond simple tasks. The possibilities are intriguing. Maybe Watson could follow you home to make sure you’re taking your medication correctly. Or it could prompt you to take a walk so you could heal faster, easily change pharmacies or arrange follow-up appointments.

Right now, the speakers don’t need regulatory approval, although that could change if they provide information about your diagnosis or explain your medications.

No matter how the hospital ends up using them, one thing is certain. It sucks being in a hospital. Having a little control over your environment could make it suck a little less.

This story appears in the summer 2017 edition of CNET Magazine. Click here for more magazine stories.

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