Get an Ecovacs Deebot Mini 2 robot vacuum for $99 – CNET

CNET’s Cheapskate scours the web for great deals on PCs, phones, gadgets and much more. Questions about the Cheapskate blog? Find the answers on our FAQ page.

CNET’s Cheapskate scours the web for great deals on PCs, phones, gadgets and much more. Questions about the Cheapskate blog? Find the answers on our FAQ page. Find more great buys on the CNET Deals page and follow the Cheapskate on Facebook and Twitter!

Sure, sure, Elon Musk, the robotic uprising is coming. Someday our ‘bots will achieve sentience and enslave us in their lithium mines.

I’ll risk it. Housecleaning is pretty much the worst chore ever, so if a ‘bot is willing to sweep and mop, I’ll give it some leeway. Besides, what’s it going to do, bump my ankle till it’s sore? (Hey, I think I just wrote a Funny or Die script!)

If you’ve been wishing for your own floor-bot, wish no more: Thursday only, and while supplies last, Meh has the Ecovacs Deebot Mini 2 robot vacuum for $99, plus $5 for shipping. Elsewhere, it sells for at least $180.

This is a bare-floor cleaner, one that not only sucks (literally), but also, optionally, mops. I’m not totally clear on the latter function — there’s a removable pad, but apparently it just soaks up any liquid that might be on the floor. It’s not wet itself, so it’s more of a dry-mop arrangement.

And true to its name, the Mini 2 is more compact than other robot vacs, meaning it should have an easier time navigating between chair and table legs and those narrow spaces between couch and ottoman.

It’s also smart enough to return to its charger when the battery gets low, and “smart” because it has Wi-Fi and can be programmed by app.

Although this model has apparently been around for six months or so, it currently has no user reviews on Amazon, which is kind of weird. And I couldn’t really find any reviews elsewhere. But I’ve tried a couple of Ecovacs’ other, larger, models and they’ve worked extremely well. The challenge for me: no virtual walls, so you can’t keep them from going into carpeted areas or rooms where they’re not wanted.

Still, if you have bare floors and hate cleaning them, this little ‘bot can get it done for cheap.

Your thoughts?

Bonus deal: Sometimes I share money-saving tips via CNET’s How-to section — like, for example, how to buy glasses online and save hundreds of dollars. This post was, in part, the result of some great reader insight via Facebook and Twitter. But I’m eager to hear your thoughts as well: Where do you typically buy your glasses, and what do you typically spend? If you’ve ordered online, what was the outcome? Good? Bad? Other?

Bonus deal No. 2: Speaking of ‘bots (aka droids), I’ll always be an R2-D2 man — but I get that lots of people love BB-8. If you’re one of them, and you’ve always dreamed of owning the adorable little guy, here’s a Black Friday-worthy deal.

For a limited time, and while supplies last, MorningSave has the Sphero Special Edition Star Wars Battle Worn BB-8 with Force Band Trainer for $79, with free shipping when you apply promo code MORNINGSAVEBB8. He runs $96 at Amazon and $118 at Walmart.

This crazy-cool toy rolls around just like the real deal. He can act autonomously, respond to your voice and drive around via app controls. Strap on the Force Band and you can control using, well, The Force (aka hand gestures).

It’s a little early to start shopping for the holidays, but this certainly would make a great gift for a kid who loves Star Wars.

Now Playing:Watch this: Learn all-new tricks with Sphero’s BB-8 and Star Wars…
1:20

Share your voice

Post a comment

Tags
The CheapskateVacuum CleanersToys and GamesRobotsStar Wars

GoPro Hero puts core features in a familiar package for $199 – CNET

GoPro’s new Hero camera looks just like the company’s Hero5 and Hero6 cameras, and that’s no accident.

Despite being an entry-level model, the Hero shares key design features with its higher-end linemates, namely a 2-inch touchscreen and a rugged body that’s waterproof without the need for a polycarbonate housing.

GoPro’s new Hero camera looks just like the company’s Hero5 and Hero6 cameras, and that’s no accident.

Despite being an entry-level model, the Hero shares key design features with its higher-end linemates, namely a 2-inch touchscreen and a rugged body that’s waterproof without the need for a polycarbonate housing.

That’s something GoPro didn’t do with its last Hero, which had little to offer beyond good video quality and a low price. And while the price of the new model is $70 more at $199 (£199, AU$299), those design features apparently mean a lot to potential buyers.

“Our research and feedback shows consumers really like having a touchscreen, so we wanted to give people that familiar experience at an entry-level price, and Hero satisfies both,” said a GoPro spokeswoman. Being waterproof to 30 feet (10 meters) without a housing is also a huge selling point for GoPro’s cameras, she said.

Now Playing:Watch this: GoPro Hero 6 goes steady with 4K and slow-motion video
3:41

While the company’s other $199 camera, the tiny cube-shaped Hero5 Session, is waterproof too, it lacks a screen for framing or reviewing shots or easily controlling the camera. It also doesn’t have a removable battery, which is another advantage of the Hero’s design.

The Session isn’t going away just yet, though. “It’s still a form factor that speaks to our core users,” the spokeswoman said. And the Session definitely has an edge when it comes to the camera’s capabilities. GoPro kept the Hero’s shooting options to a bare minimum:

Record video at 1080p or 1440p at 60 or 30 frames per second (fps) in MP4 at 60Mbps
Snap 10-megapixel photos
Burst shoot at 10fps
Capture time-lapse photos and video at 0.5-second intervals

If you just read that list and wondered why there’s no 4K or slow-mo options for video or raw capture or low-light settings for photos, this camera isn’t for you. The Hero is aimed squarely at casual and first-time users who want to shoot and share experiences they can’t grab with a phone.

The shooting options might be lean, but to help balance things out, GoPro added voice controls and electronic video stabilization. Plus, with the built-in Wi-Fi, you can send clips straight to your phone as soon as you stop recording and have them instantly turned into an edited video with GoPro’s mobile app.

At the start of the year, GoPro dropped the price of its premium model, the Hero6 Black, from $499 to $399. The addition of the $199 Hero along with the $299 Hero5 Black ($295.99 at Amazon.com) moves GoPro’s plan forward to return to a good, better, best product strategy.

“What we’ve learned is people want ‘good, better, best’ options from us. So with the new Hero we now have cameras that are characteristically GoPro — durable, waterproof, cool design — with feature sets for every level of user.”

The GoPro Hero is available today at retailers and direct from GoPro.

Security: Stay up-to-date on the latest in breaches, hacks, fixes and all those cybersecurity issues that keep you up at night.

Does the Mac still matter? Apple execs explain why the MacBook Pro was over four years in the making, and why we should care

Share your voice

Post a comment

Tags
CamcordersCamerasGoPro

OneJet Introduces Service in West Palm Beach with Inaugural Flight from Pittsburgh

PIT to PBI: Departing 11:20 a.m. ET and arriving 1:50 p.m. ET

PBI to PIT: Departing 2:20 p.m. ET and arriving 4:50 p.m. ET

The OneJet Plus service provides a premium service experience onboard retrofitted ERJ 135 aircraft, including pre-assigned seats, extended legroom at every seat, complimentary 4G high-speed Wi-Fi, streaming entertainment gate to gate, and complimentary beer, wine and premium snacks en route.

PIT to PBI: Departing 11:20 a.m. ET and arriving 1:50 p.m. ET
PBI to PIT: Departing 2:20 p.m. ET and arriving 4:50 p.m. ET

The OneJet Plus service provides a premium service experience onboard retrofitted ERJ 135 aircraft, including pre-assigned seats, extended legroom at every seat, complimentary 4G high-speed Wi-Fi, streaming entertainment gate to gate, and complimentary beer, wine and premium snacks en route.

“We’re extremely excited to welcome our southernmost destination, West Palm Beach to the OneJet network,” said Matt Maguire, OneJet CEO. “The Pittsburgh-West Palm Beach Route will provide a premium, convenient nonstop service option for both business and leisure travelers.”

“OneJet is continuing to grow its base of operations in Pittsburgh, offering key nonstop options for travelers,” Allegheny County Airport Authority CEO Christina Cassotis said. “The latest addition to West Palm Beach serves both business and leisure travelers with daily service. OneJet is an important partner and we’re happy to see the airline continue to grow with the introduction of larger aircraft.”

“We are thrilled to offer nonstop, year-round service to the Pittsburgh market through Pittsburgh International Airport (PIT). OneJet’s schedule, offering 4 flights weekly, is a great fit with the needs of our passengers. We welcome OneJet and are confident the route will be a success.” Said Director of Airports for Palm Beach County, Bruce Pelly.

OneJet opened its first base in Pittsburgh in May 2016 with two daily flights. The company now offers more than 220 weekly flights to and from its operating bases in Pittsburgh and Milwaukee, as well as exclusive nonstop service to and from Albany, Buffalo, Cincinnati, Columbus, Hartford, Indianapolis, Kansas City, Louisville, Omaha, Palm Beach, Providence and Richmond.

For additional information, visit onejet.com. For customer inquiries or travel assistance, call 1‑844-ONEJET1 (1-844-663-5381).

About OneJet
OneJet is an air transportation network that provides consumers increased access to nonstop travel in small to midsize markets, at relatively low cost. Services operate from the main commercial terminals and airports in markets served and feature TSA PreCheck access, expedited boarding and complimentary onboard amenities, including high-speed internet access. All flights are operated by regionally based operating partners featuring ARGUS Platinum safety-rated and TSA-certified operations. The company incorporates former senior leadership from the major U.S. airlines, the U.S. Department of Transportation, leading U.S. aircraft manufacturers and the TSA.

Media Contact
Loren Antonio Duran
917-353-0949
loren.duran@havas.com

Cision View original content with multimedia:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/onejet-introduces-service-in-west-palm-beach-with-inaugural-flight-from-pittsburgh-300621667.html

SOURCE OneJet

Related Links

http://www.onejet.com

Many Drivers Misinformed about What Data Their Car is Sharing

Interestingly, consumers are often equally unclear as to whether or not their vehicles are tracking data in the first place. Many think that only newer cars have the ability to capture data.

Interestingly, consumers are often equally unclear as to whether or not their vehicles are tracking data in the first place. Many think that only newer cars have the ability to capture data. However, according to experts, if a car was built after 2014, it’s beaming back info to carmakers about consumers’ driving patterns, the roads they travel, the music they listen to, and pretty much everything their car does.

Esurance asked consumers for their thoughts about what data their car is sharing. Watch the video here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6S29bC3aIJ4.

Consumer beliefs about car data
Based on interviews and research, Esurance uncovered the following consumer beliefs:

Only newer, expensive cars are “connected cars.” (a myth) A hacker could disable my brakes. (a reality) Data collected from cars is trivial compared to other sources. (a myth) My data is being collected even though I never gave permission for that. (a reality) I turned off Wi-Fi in my car, so it’s not connected. (a myth)

To clarify consumer beliefs about car data, Esurance spoke to experts on three major areas of concerns:

Data from connected cars Issues of data privacy and hacking Promises of safer roads in the future

Data from connected cars
Car companies use the data from connected cars to improve designs and discover potential manufacturing defects. “The promise of all this data is a much better experience – keeping us safer, but also creating new opportunities for connection,” says David Bader, chair of Georgia Tech’s School of Computational Science and Engineering.

Connected cars will soon communicate with roadside infrastructure, sending data about problems such as pot holes, bad weather, and accidents. Roadside infrastructure, such as cellular-enabled black boxes attached to street lights, bridges, and traffic lights, is needed to implement this technology at a wide scale. “The idea of a traffic jam goes away,” says tech futurist Gray Scott, explaining that cars will be rerouted automatically based on their destination, keeping traffic moving at the right pace and spaced to prevent accidents.

Data privacy and hacking
In 2017, two senators introduced the SPY Car Act, establishing federal standards to secure cars and protect drivers’ privacy, but it hasn’t yet gained traction. “We are in the gold rush of data right now – it’s basically who can dig it up first,” says Gray Scott. Until laws are passed that govern how this information can be used, it’s unclear to consumers what car companies are doing with their data. Still, carmakers know that a news-making hack is devastating to business and are protecting data accordingly. Right now, driving a connected car is safe, can improve the driving experience, and could even save drivers money on insurance.

The promise of safer roads
The exchange of information between cars will enable the leap to driverless vehicles. “It’s once we get to fully or highly autonomous connected vehicles that we will see the greatest safety benefits of connected cars,” says Matthew Channon, author of The Law and Driverless Cars. In the coming decades, autonomous, driverless cars will be commonplace and we may not even own our cars. “In the future, connected autonomous vehicles will be literally taxis,” says Channon. “You walk outside your door, you hail it, and it takes you where you want to go.”

“One of the biggest promises of shared data is that it will make driving and our roads safer,” said Stephanie Braun, director, connected car at Esurance. “While connected-car technology is still in its infancy, there’s an exciting future ahead that will bring us driverless cars, transforming our lives on the road for the better.”

To learn more about car data myths and realities, please visit www.esurance.com/car-data.

About Esurance®
Esurance, insurance for the modern world®, provides auto, homeowners, motorcycle, and renters insurance direct to consumers online and over the phone. With an easy-to-use mobile app, helpful online tools like photo claims and Coverage Counselor®, and knowledgeable experts, Esurance is the smart choice for today’s web-savvy consumer. And as a member of the Allstate family with an A+ rating from A.M. Best*, Esurance offers auto and home insurance that’s just a click, call, or tap away.

Press releases and more information about Esurance are available at www.esurance.com.

Media Contact:
Dolleen Cross
DCross@esurance.com
415-875-4722

*Esurance Insurance Company and Esurance Property and Casualty Insurance Company have A+ u positive ratings. Esurance Insurance Company of New Jersey has an A rating. Ratings effective as of October 2017. Click here for a guide to A.M. Best’s Credit Ratings™. Allstate products are not available through Esurance.

Cision View original content with multimedia:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/many-drivers-misinformed-about-what-data-their-car-is-sharing-300621442.html

SOURCE Esurance

Related Links

http://www.esurance.com

Why mobile is at the heart of Industry 4.0

5G and the Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT) are two megatrands taking shape in the mobile industry but they do not have a dependent relationship.

The former is a new generation of mobile networks while the latter is a completely new way of doing business that can transform entire industries.

5G and the Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT) are two megatrands taking shape in the mobile industry but they do not have a dependent relationship.

The former is a new generation of mobile networks while the latter is a completely new way of doing business that can transform entire industries. They may overlap in several areas, but each has its own, individual development path.

Industrial giants like Siemens and Bosch have been touting the concept for some time now, using the umbrella term ‘Industry 4.0’ to describe what is an evolution in manufacturing, incorporating advanced communications and automation.

But if communications are at the heart of Industry 4.0 then 5G’s low latency, high capacity and gigabit speeds could take the IIoT to the next level. It’s a huge opportunity for the entire mobile sector to provide the networks, devices and applications needed.

Inventing Industry 4.0

The term ‘Industry 4.0’ was popularised by the Germany’s Digital Agenda, published back in 2009, which has influenced the strategies of several other countries and organisations, including the EU. Henrik von Scheel describes Industry 4.0 was a movement that will change every industry.

“Industry 4.0 is not about technology, it’s about people, how people connect and how they work together,” he tells the Smart IoT London conference. “Of course there’s competition, innovation and transformation with productivity and automation, but at the core of it is where people work together.”

The first industrial revolution was of course the mechanisation of manufacturing in the 18th century, with the arrival of water and steam power in Britain’s factories, while the second industrial revolution started in the US with electronic equipment, power plants and mass production with an assembly line.

“it started with meat production [in Cincinnati, USA] and then motor cars with Ford Model T,” adds von Scheel. “It went into shipyards, metal production and everything else. But it was linear, industry-specific and moved slowly.”

‘Industry 3.0’ started in the 1970s and was heralded by the arrival of IT into the factory. Indeed, it is arguably still ongoing.

“The Internet started and then came mobile, social, cloud and big data,” continues von Scheel. “This is what you call IoT. This is the third industrial revolution and it has already happened.”

Collaborative spirit

For Alan Norbury, Siemens Industrial CTO, Industry 4.0 is characterised by big data, smart algorithms, robotics, 3D printing, virtual reality (VR), augmented reality (AR) and cyber-physical systems. Industrial machines will all speak to each other and share data which can be analysed for the business and to make real-time, automated decisions.

“Digitalization changes our lives and the way we manufacture products,” he says, adding that new business models will be able to predict consumer demand. Although some high value industries, such as car manufacturing, have been able to offer highly personalised products, Norbury says other businesses will be able to do the same, adding value.

He uses the more spurious example of customised muesli, packaged on the same assembly line, and the more revolutionary possibility of personalised medicine based on how a person reacts to certain drugs. It is this added value that Norbury believes will allow humans and robots to work together.

And the creation of a ‘digital twin’ – that is a virtual representation of a physical object – will allow organisations to test something it with few or no consequences.

Communications at the heart

But where is the opportunity for mobile? Well all this will need connecting and for all the ambition shown by the industrial heavyweights, telecoms will play a vital role.

“Most manufacturers already have buildings and the challenge they have from going from Industry 3.0 to Industry 4.0 is where to start,” says Norbury.

First off, organisations should see what equipment can be connected and the second is how.

There has been a lot of attention paid to lowering the power consumption and increasing the range of IoT standard through Low Power Wide Area Networks (LPWAN). Connected devices such as smart metres or agricultural sensors only need to transmit very small amounts of data at infrequent intervals across long distances and therefore the focus has been on longevity.

The opposite is true of IIoT where many, mission-critical, data intensive machines are located in close proximity. Furthermore, applications such as VR, AR and connected vehicles will need to be connected reliably wit enough capacity. Some IIoT deployments have made use of 4G networks using unlicensed spectrum but 5G will allow this to take place on an unprecedented scale.

Bosch believes localised 5G networks, with or without the participation of operators, could turn Industry 4.0 into ‘Industry 4.0 Advanced Pro’.

“We don’t need a national network for this, we could have a local deployment,” says Bosch’s Andreas Mueller, adding that it works with firms in the supply chain, such as Qualcomm, so it can get its ideas across to working groups like the 3GPP.

“You might have some great ideas but never get heard,” he laments.

When asked by TechRadar Pro, Mueller suggests that spectrum could be reserved for IIoT and allocated on a regional basis to avoid interference. Indeed, an area as compact as an individual factory could be considered its own region.

“Relying on the traditional Wi-Fi bands will probably never happen,” he says. “There will probably be dedicated spectrum.”

The operator opportunity

Just as LPWAN might be a better fit for some applications than an operator’s cellular network, perhaps a localised deployment might be more suitable for such an intensive operation.

Dominic Hulewicz, IoT Innovation Manager at O2, who believes the operator’s role is to partner with the customer, understand their needs and get the right connectivity into their environment.

“It may not be that our cellular network is the best fit,” he freely admits, referring to LPWAN. “We partner ourselves with other providers to give the best solution that our customers are trying to do.”

In a world where traditional operator income are declining, Industry 4.0 is a massive opportunity for operators looking to boost revenues and find applications for the 5G networks that will come into operation as early as next year. Indeed, Cisco and partners are seeing how 5G can help utility firms and farmers in rural areas as part of a government funded trial.

But there are also opportunities for manufacturers and developers. More advanced mobile devices will be the first point of call for many of these applications. Rugged smartphones, wearables and VR headsets will all become commonplace in factories and other working environments as the IIoT takes over.

Of course, many of these trends are already happening and elements of Industry 4.0 or the IIoT have been deployed since before the terms were coined. But for the potential of this technological revolution to be fulfilled, it’s clear the network will play an important role.

Want to find out more about 5G? Check out our dedicated 5Ghub!

Check out the best mobile deals for March 2018

5 of the world’s biggest network outages

It’s often said – partly with tongue in cheek – that if Maslow’s famous hierarchy of human needs were revised today, internet connectivity would feature at its foundation. Look around any office space when the internet goes down, or a busy train carriage that moves out of signal range.

It’s often said – partly with tongue in cheek – that if Maslow’s famous hierarchy of human needs were revised today, internet connectivity would feature at its foundation. Look around any office space when the internet goes down, or a busy train carriage that moves out of signal range. The palpable sense of aimlessness highlights just how reliant we have become on connectivity.

Yet, as pervasive as the internet may be, there are still rare instances where it can be lost for more than a brief moment. Only in December, a power outage at a Manchester-based data centre brought hundreds of businesses to a standstill on one of the busiest traffic days of the year. The knock on commercial effects of such occurrences can be catastrophic for both providers and business customers.

The typical cause of a mass outage varies. According to the Ponemon Institute, the three most common causes are power supply failure (25%), cybercrime (22%) and accidental human error (22%). In this post, we look at some of the most notable network outages in recent years, what caused them and how to be prepared in the event of a future reoccurrence.

The best security suites for business 20181. Dyn cyberattack (2016)

Countries affected: United States and Europe

Impact: Millions of users of popular sites including Airbnb, Amazon, BBC, CNN, eBay, Netflix and Twitter

What happened: It’s often easy to forget just how interconnected the web is, and how reliant the online information and services we use daily are on shared underlying protocols. This was clearly exemplified in October 2016, when multiple distributed denial-of-service attacks (DDoS attacks) targeted systems operated by Managed Domain Name Systems (DNS) provider Dyn.

Thought to be the largest DDoS attack in history, the outbreak originated from malware vulnerabilities in a large number of internet-connected devices such as printers, IP cameras and baby monitors.

As a result, hundreds of popular websites were taken offline for hours, bringing chaos to users and costing businesses millions in lost revenue.

2. British Airways IT failure (2017)

Countries affected: United Kingdom/global

Impact: Thousands of passengers globally

What happened: Everyone at some stage has experienced the frustration of an airport delay. Perhaps an adverse weather event or traffic signalling problems can result in mild confusion and lost hours at the airport terminal. For British Airways customers in May 2017, the situation was far more dire.

A global IT crash resulted in the airline’s entire fleet being grounded, leaving thousands of passengers stranded over one of the busiest weekends for travel in the UK. So, what caused such widespread chaos? An IT maintenance contractor accidentally switched off an ‘uninterruptable power supply’ at a key data centre, damaging the server during the subsequent power surge.

Along with the mandatory compensation payments and the hit to revenues and profits, the obvious consequences for the airline’s reputation have had a lasting impact.

3. Amazon Web Services (2017)

Countries affected: Global

Impact: Millions of cloud service and website users

What happened: It seems almost unfair to single AWS out here, as nearly every cloud platform has suffered some form of outage in recent years. Yet, it’s only when one of the biggest goes down that you realise just how dependent we are on these cloud behemoths.

In this particular instance, Amazon’s S3 web-based storage service experienced high error rates, leading to either partial or full outages on a number of popular websites, apps and devices. Sites affected included Quora, Business Insider and Slack, among others. Originating in its US-East-1 data centre, it’s thought the issue could have been avoided had developers spread their applications over different facilities.

Indeed, this wasn’t an isolated incident. The provider suffered similar outages in September 2015 due to software problems at a North Virginia data centre.

4. Vodafone data centre (2011)

Countries affected: UK

Impact: Thousands of Vodafone customers

What happened: Businesses invest millions each year in ensuring their data servers are safe from the multitude of online threats. Given the ever-evolving nature of cyber attacks, this is money well spent. Some businesses may, however, overlook the physical security aspect, which is equally important.

Mobile phone operator Vodafone learned this lesson the hard way after thieves broke into its Hampshire-based data centre using sledgehammers. The breach caused major service interruptions, leading to a flood of angry complaints from customers.

5. A whole country without connection (2011)

Countries affected: Republic of Armenia

Impact: 3 million people

What happened: This is perhaps the most humorous of our examples – unless, of course, you’re Armenian. It’s not often that an entire nation loses connectivity, yet that’s exactly what happened to the small former Russian republic in 2011 when a 75-year-old woman digging for scrap metal damaged land cables and thereby severed most connectivity across the nation. To rub salt in the wound, the culprit wasn’t even Armenian – the ‘spade-hacker’ was conducting her excavation in neighbouring Georgia!

What can you do to be prepared?

The explosive growth of mobile usage and Wi-Fi connectivity over the past decade has brought a new set of connectivity needs and challenges for businesses and network providers alike. While a great deal of work has been done to secure network infrastructure and develop software that can guard against emerging threats, the chances of similar outages happening in the future still exist.

While it must be emphasised that such instances are rare, the sudden and unpredictable nature of outages can highlight even the slightest network or security vulnerabilities. It’s therefore essential that businesses and providers do their due diligence in preparing for them. Risk assessment, planning and provisioning are a given for most organisations, but to be truly prepared businesses must ensure their IT architecture has flexibility, security and resilience built in.

Colocation data centres can provide a simple and effective route to greater network resilience. By colocating, a business can have multiple points of presence across different facilities, meaning less reliance on any single data centre being fully operational. Adding world-class digital and physical security provides an extra layer of defence against emerging threats, whether malicious or otherwise.

No business can have the luxury of knowing the challenges tomorrow will bring, but with the right IT systems in place they have the greatest chance of keeping their business – and those dependent on it – online. They’d be lost without it.

Michael Rabinowitz is director of marketing & strategy, connectivity at Interxion. He has over 20 years of experience in the telecommunications market with experience of infrastructure and service development with telcos across the globe.

Android P features arrive on Wear OS for developers

Google has released a Wear OS developer preview that includes features from its upcoming Android P software update.

Writing on its Android Developer’s Blog, the search giant revealed some of the key features coming to the Android wristwear platform, including a default Dark UI for better “glanceability for wear apps” and the end of background activity for apps unless your watch is on charge.

Google has released a Wear OS developer preview that includes features from its upcoming Android P software update.

Writing on its Android Developer’s Blog, the search giant revealed some of the key features coming to the Android wristwear platform, including a default Dark UI for better “glanceability for wear apps” and the end of background activity for apps unless your watch is on charge.

The latter is aimed at improving performance and battery life of Wear OS smartwatches, so we’re hoping we’ll see the wearables consistently last longer than two days on a single charge.

If you take the watch off your wrist for an extended time, the new Wear OS software will detect this and turn off Wi-Fi, Bluetooth and cellular radios to help further improve battery life.

Android P release date, first impressions and newsNot for you

If you like the sound of what the developer preview is offering then hold up, as Google says “this initial release is intended for developers only and is not for daily or consumer use. Therefore, it is only available via manual download and flash.”

It’s also only available as “a downloadable system image for the Huawei Watch 2 Bluetooth or Huawei Watch 2 Classic Bluetooth” which again somewhat limits the reach of this software.

There’s no word on when we will the final release of this Wear OS update, but Google may reveal more at its I/O 2018 conference in May.

Google IO 2018: what we want to see

Latest achievements on next-generation broadband networks honored as Broadband Forum holds annual awards and elections

Lincoln Lavoie, senior engineer and industry lead for the executive steering body at the University of New Hampshire InterOperability Laboratory (UNH-IOL) received a Distinguished Fellow Award for his substantial contributions to a wide range of successful Broadband Forum projects.

Lincoln Lavoie, senior engineer and industry lead for the executive steering body at the University of New Hampshire InterOperability Laboratory (UNH-IOL) received a Distinguished Fellow Award for his substantial contributions to a wide range of successful Broadband Forum projects. These include the G-PON Certification Test Plan, the TR-069 Certification Testing Program, the Gfast Certification Testing Program, the formation of the Open Broadband Labs projects, and countless plugfest testing activities.

“As we develop broadband networks for future generations, these awards highlight some of the true innovation happening within the Forum and the personal achievements that go alongside,” said Kevin Foster, Chairman of the Broadband Forum. “Since we launched our Broadband 20/20 vision, the rate of progress has been incredible with the Gfast certification program and FANS specification among the significant developments. The dedication and commitment of our members is vital to our success. These latest achievements reinforce the importance of standardization in a rapidly evolving broadband ecosystem.”

Two Circle of Excellence awards were also presented. One went to Bruno Cornaglia, of Vodafone, who edited the groundbreaking TR-370 Fixed Access Network Sharing specification, which was completed last November, providing a revolutionary business model for the broadband industry. Cornaglia is currently editing the follow up WT-370 to add Software Defined Networking capabilities.

The second Circle of Excellence accolade was presented to Marcos Martinez, of Maxlinear, in recognition of his work on the first industry test plan for comparative tests between powerline in-premises broadband technologies (TR-208 – Performance Test Plan for In-premises Powerline Communications Systems). Martinez has also been integral to all projects around broadband in-premises heterogeneous connectivity, including technologies like G.hn, MoCA and Wi-Fi.

There were also numerous recipients of the Outstanding Contributor award which is made to individuals who have gone above and beyond the call of duty to make valuable contributions within the Forum’s Work Areas. The full list of recipients was:

Marco Spini, of Huawei, for work on a number of complex topics and providing an important liaison between the Forum and 3GPP. Ludwig Pauwels, of Nokia, and Nick Hancock, of ADTRAN, for their contributions to the Common YANG project. Yuanlong Jiang, of Huawei, for key contributions to Mobile Transport and Routing work. Georgios Karagiannis, of Huawei, for work on the Cloud-based Central Office Reference Architecture Framework, now known as TR-384 CloudCO.

The Athens meeting also saw the annual elections take place, with Bernd Hesse, of Calix, and John Blackford, of Arris, voted on to the board. David Sinicrope, of Ericsson, Frank Van der Putten, of Nokia, Kevin Foster, of BT, and Mauro Tilocca, of Telecom Italia, will also continue to hold their positions on the board after they were re-elected.

“The expertise and experience of our members is vital as we continue to evolve broadband networks and deliver next-generation broadband,” said Robin Mersh, CEO of the Broadband Forum. “Without our work, mass deployment of new technologies such as Gfast would happen at a much slower rate, impacting those that depend on such methods for access to high-speed broadband.”

For more information about the Broadband Forum, visit: https://www.broadband-forum.org/.

About the Broadband Forum
Broadband Forum, a non-profit industry organization, is focused on engineering smarter and faster broadband networks. The Forum’s flagship TR-069 CPE WAN Management Protocol has now exceeded 350 million installations worldwide.

Our work defines best practices for global networks, enables new revenue-generating service and content delivery, establishes technology migration strategies, engineers critical device, service & development management tools, in the home and business IP networking infrastructure. We develop multi-service broadband packet networking specifications addressing architecture, device and service management, software data models interoperability and certification in the Broadband market.

Our free technical reports and white papers can be found at www.broadband-forum.org. Twitter @Broadband_Forum.

For more information about the Broadband Forum, please go to http://www.broadband-forum.org or follow @Broadband_Forum on Twitter. For further information please contact Brian Dolby on +44 (0) 7899 914168 or brian.dolby@proactive-pr.com or Jayne Brooks on +44 (0) 1636 704 888 or jayne.brooks@proactive-pr.com.

Cision View original content:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/latest-achievements-on-next-generation-broadband-networks-honored-as-broadband-forum-holds-annual-awards-and-elections-300621572.html

SOURCE Broadband Forum

Related Links

https://www.broadband-forum.org

Take a look at SimpliSafe’s new home security system – CNET

The heart of each system is the Base Station. Along with a built-in siren, it houses the Wi-Fi and cellular radios that it uses to contact authorities in an emergency, and it also includes a 24-hour battery backup to keep you protected when the power goes out.

The heart of each system is the Base Station. Along with a built-in siren, it houses the Wi-Fi and cellular radios that it uses to contact authorities in an emergency, and it also includes a 24-hour battery backup to keep you protected when the power goes out.

Caption by / Photo by Chris Monroe/CNET

Netgear Nighthawk Pro Gaming XR500 review – CNET

Netgear’s Nighthawk XR500 Pro Gaming Wi-Fi router is built for gamers who want to customize their experience and gain complete control of their home network. The menu is powered by UK-based NetDumas’s DumaOS and gives gamers all the tools and analytics they need to minimize latency and keep their games running smoothly.

Netgear’s Nighthawk XR500 Pro Gaming Wi-Fi router is built for gamers who want to customize their experience and gain complete control of their home network. The menu is powered by UK-based NetDumas’s DumaOS and gives gamers all the tools and analytics they need to minimize latency and keep their games running smoothly. With geofiltering you can even set a radius from your location to ensure that you only connect with local servers and players.

The AC2600 router also offers top speeds, great Wi-Fi coverage and detailed parental controls. For $300, this router is a gamer’s dream, but everyone in your household will benefit from Netgear’s powerful hardware. It’s available now in the UK for £240 and in mid-April in Australia for AU$449.

It looks like the aliens have landed

The XR500 looks like something straight out of the show “Battlebots.” Its wide, flat design is similar to others in the Nighthawk line, but this one has sharp angles all around it. The myriad LED lights on the front are pretty bright and distracting, but you can flip a switch in back to shut them off. A wall mount option would have been nice, but the router is pretty cool looking, so displaying it on a shelf won’t be too problematic.