Best Kodi/XBMC streaming boxes 2018: the best hardware for Kodi streaming

Kodi boxes are a massive success no matter how you slice them. The best models deliver 4K video to your TV and allow you unfettered access to audio and video streams of every format and service.

Kodi boxes are a massive success no matter how you slice them. The best models deliver 4K video to your TV and allow you unfettered access to audio and video streams of every format and service. If there’s a better, more versatile piece of AV software out there, we’ve yet to see it.

On top of giving you the capability to stream video and music files over a local network, the software also includes the ability to install add-ons to stream from almost any streaming service you could think of, including Amazon Prime Instant Video, Spotify and Netflix.

One of the main selling points of Kodi is the fact that it’s supported by pretty much any platform you could think of, up to and including macOS, Android, Linux and Windows. The only real drawback we can think of is that Kodi doesn’t actually manufacture streaming boxes (no, the official Kodi Raspberry Pi case doesn’t count), so you need to find your own device to run it on.

Luckily, dozens of manufacturers the world over are more than happy to provide some to you. That said, while there are plenty of boxes available with Kodi pre-installed, you have to be careful. So-called ‘fully loaded’ Kodi boxes come with lots of add-ons that give you access to pirated content. Unsurprisingly, there’s a huge crackdown on these types of boxes, with the EU declaring them illegal.

The best solution is to find a compatible media box and manually install Kodi. And with this guide, we’ve gathered together the best Kodi streaming boxes on the market in 2018. For each, we’ve tested how easy it is to install Kodi, how smoothly it runs, and how each handles playing 1080p or 4K video.

You will find the best VPN services for Kodi and check out our best Android boxes buying guide as well.

Putting Kodi on the Amazon Fire TV takes a bit of finagling, yes, but when it’s on there the world of streaming video will be your oyster. We prefer the latest iteration of Amazon’s streaming device because it delivers 4K HDR video via a small, inconspicuous dongle. It’s easy to hide out of sight and does nothing to mar the appearance of a perfectly clean entertainment center.

In terms of specs, the Amazon Fire TV has a Quad core ARM Cortex-A53 CPU with speeds up to 1.5GHz. It uses the Amlogic S905Z SoC architecture and supports 32-bit apps. Inside you’ve got 2GB of RAM and 8GB of storage. Its Wi-Fi antenna supports 802.11 a/b/g/n/ac; 2×2 MIMO (2.4 GHz and 5.0 GHz dual band) which means it can handle 4K streams without a problem.

Our only problem with the Amazon Fire TV is that the remote isn’t the best. It’s made from a plastic material and, due to its small stature, can be easily lost. Minor qualms aside, however, this is probably the best Kodi box on the market right now.

Read the full review:Amazon Fire TV (2017)

The Amazon Fire TV Stick is one of the most popular streaming devices among Kodi users – and it has been for a while. With the 2017 version of the Fire TV Stick, things are even better. A faster processor makes the media streamer 30% faster than the old one, according to Amazon. The new stick also features Alexa support built in (although this doesn’t work with Kodi), and the device is only slightly more expensive than the original.

However, getting Kodi on the Fire TV Stick can be a bit of a hassle, as the app is not listed in the Amazon app store. Instead, you have to sideload Kodi. Once installed, though, the Fire TV stick is phenomenal.

Check out our guide on how to install Kodi on a Fire TV Stick

The included Bluetooth remote control effortlessly navigates through Kodi’s menus and interface. While the older Fire TV struggled a little to navigate Kodi’s menus smoothly, the new model has no such trouble with the default skin.

Keep in mind that the Fire TV’s HDMI output only supports up to 1080p video. Testing, we found that our 1080p videos played smoothly; 4K videos launched and were downscaled, but we soon ran into buffering problems as the Fire TV struggled to keep up with the high quality video.

If you don’t care about not having 4K and want a small, simple device that can handle 1080p Kodi, as well as Netflix and Amazon Prime Instant Video, this is the best Kodi streaming box for you.

Read the full review: Amazon Fire TV Stick

The Amazon Fire TV is a top choice for anyone that wants a great all-rounder. At its heart, this media player is an excellent choice for Amazon Prime Instant Video and Netflix, supporting both services in 4K with HDR, but the power to play Ultra HD content means that the Fire TV is also rather good for Kodi.

As with the Amazon Fire TV Stick, Kodi is not available through the official app store, so it has to be sideloaded. This is slightly annoying to do, but not overly difficult. Once installed, Kodi can be launched quickly from the main menu.

Check out our guide on how to install Kodi on the Amazon Fire TV

Kodi runs beautifully smoothly on the Fire TV and takes just a few seconds to load. Amazon’s excellent Voice Remote is great for navigation and connects via Bluetooth, so you don’t need line of sight; voice commands are not supported in Kodi, though.

We tested using 1080p and 4K videos, with both playing smoothly. The Fire TV has 802.11ac Wi-Fi built in, but if your home network isn’t fast enough to play video without buffering, there’s an Ethernet port, too.

While streaming is the easiest option, the Fire TV has a microSD card slot so that you can load this up with movies. Given the media player’s small dimensions, you can load it up with content for travelling.

If you want Kodi in 4K, but want access to other streaming services, too, the Amazon Fire TV is the box to buy.

Read the full review: Amazon Fire TV

The Nvidia Shield is the most powerful Android set-top box that we’ve reviewed. It’s designed with all types of 4K home entertainment in mind, from Netflix to the latest games via Geforce Now. Unsurprisingly, this power makes the Nvidia Shield one of the best boxes for Kodi.

Running Android TV on Android 6.0, the Nvidia Shield is one of the easiest boxes to configure Kodi on. With Google Play reconfigured for your TV screen and remote control, rather than a touchscreen, installing Kodi was an absolute breeze; in fact, we didn’t have to type anything, since we were able to use the voice search provided by the remote control to find the Kodi app.

Kodi started in just a couple of seconds, with the box recovering from standby in a similar amount of time. There are no lengthy waits with the Nvidia Shield.

Once in Kodi performance was exceptional, with super-smooth menus and animations across the board. The menus and interface were easy to navigate using the excellent bundled remote control, too.

We tested 4K and 1080p videos, with both streaming smoothly. The Shield could also easily downsample 4K video to fill a 1080p TV, too. We had no problems using the built-in 802.11ac Wi-Fi; if your network signal isn’t strong enough, there’s an Ethernet port in the back.

Considering the small size of the Nvidia Shield, the performance is phenomenal. If you don’t care about the gaming content, the Amazon Fire TV is better value for 4K playback; if you want the absolute best performance, this is the media streamer to buy.

Read the full review:Nvidia Shield

Want 4K, but don’t want to pay over the top for a box that can handle it? You need the Android-powered Seguro Trongle X4.

There’s always a slight fear that bargain-basement products have severe limitations, but the Trongle X4 is refreshingly good, with only the minor annoyance. Measuring just 110mm square with a height of 17mm, the Trongle X4 is also one of the smallest set-top boxes that we’ve seen.

Wi-Fi is built in, but the X4 couldn’t see our 5GHz 802.11ac network, so could only connect via 2.4GHz. The connection was painfully slow, so we recommend using the Ethernet connection at the back instead.

As the X4 runs full Android 6.0, the Google Play Store is built in, making it straightforward to install Kodi (or other Android apps). As the play store is designed for touch, navigating it with a remote control is a little painful. It’s handy that the remote has a Mouse button, so you can move an on-screen pointer to make selection a little easier, though. Once installed, Kodi can be pinned to the front screen, making it easy to launch; the only thing you have to wait for is the X4’s 25s boot time, as there’s no fast standby mode.

The X4’s HDMI 2.0b output supports HDR10 and HLG HDR processing, along with Ultra HD resolutions, so you’ll easily be able to play the best-looking content on this box.

After all of the latest updates had downloaded and installed, Kodi ran smoothly on the X4, quickly connecting to our shared folders. We tested both 1080p and 4K films, with all playing smoothly, thanks to the 2GHz quad-core Amlogic S905X CPU. Buffering becomes an issue over Wi-Fi, but we had no such problems when using Ethernet. There’s even a microSD card slot (up to 32GB), so you can store content locally and carry the X4 around with you, making it great for holidays. The Amazon Fire TV and Nvidia Shield are slicker for 4K, but this is a good budget option.

The Raspberry Pi 3 is a brilliant little computer for all types of projects, and its diminutive size makes it an attractive option for building a tiny Kodi media centre. The Raspberry Pi Foundation makes this easy, too, with NOOBS supporting two pre-built options: LibreELEC and OSMC. We’ve used OSMC for this guide.

Once installed, the Pi 3 boots into OSMC and runs you through a quick configuration wizard before moving to Kodi. After that, the Raspberry Pi 3 takes around 20s to power on. OSMC gives you a custom skin designed for the Pi, although you can switch back to the Classic option. We recommend avoiding over-complicated skins, as the Pi may struggle to run them. As it stands, the default skins work well, but the animations are only just on the right side of smooth. It’s also worth buying a fast microSD card so that the Pi 3 boots quickly and remains responsive.

Thanks to its quad-core CPU, we found that that the Raspberry Pi 3 could handle 1080p videos easily. There’s no Ultra HD support from the HDMI output, and the Pi 3 can’t downscale 4K movies. With our test 4K footage, the Pi showed a broken image and became very jerky to use. Given the 802.11n Wi-Fi built into the Pi 3, you may find that you need to use the wired Ethernet connection if your wireless network signal isn’t strong enough and you get buffering issues.

The Pi 3 comes without a case, so you’ll need to budget for one. It doesn’t ship with a remote, either, although you may be able to control Kodi using an HDMI CEC-compatible TV’s remote; the smartphone app is otherwise the easiest method.

If you have a Raspberry Pi 3 already, it will make a decent 1080p Kodi media centre. If you don’t have one, the Amazon Fire TV Stick is a better choice, and cheaper considering it comes with a remote and doesn’t need a case.

Read the full review:Raspberry Pi 3

The Emtec GEM Box might seem like a good choice for Kodi, but we’d only recommend it if you’ve already got the box itself lying around. Running Android 4.4, the GEM Box is not compatible with the latest builds of Kodi, and the Google Play Store doesn’t show the software as available for download.

Instead, you have to install the Complete Kodi Setup Wizard, which gives you access to older versions of the software. From here, we could install Kodi 15.2 Isengard instead. It’s fiddly using to Google Play Store to install the Setup Wizard, and we had to flick the switch at the bottom of the game controller to move between normal and mouse mode in order to select the search box and installation options.

Kodi 15.2 ran smoothly enough on our GEM Box, and we soon had it set up to stream content. Full HD content played without trouble. The GEM Box doesn’t have a 4K output, nor can it downsample 4K video; our Ultra HD video just crashed the media player, and we had to cycle the power. Struggling with larger video files shows that the quad-core processor is a little behind the times.

We had no problems streaming videos over either the 2.4GHz Wi-Fi or Ethernet connections. If you want local storage, the GEM Box can take a microSD card, for locally stored video. That can make the diminutive GEM Box a handy device to carry around.

The issue with the GEM Box is its price and out-of-date operating system. If you have one already, being able to install Kodi is useful; if you want to buy a new Kodi box, look elsewhere in this guide.

The PC is the most versatile platform on Earth, so why not use it to build your very own Kodi box? Yes, the total cost will outstrip that of the other models here, but you’ll get a more powerful unit that can run more than just Kodi.

There are lots of options to go for, too. The simplest is to buy a pre-made mini PC. We tested on the excellent, but not widely available, Asus VivoMini VC65. This tiny computer measures 197 x 196 x 62mm, so will easily squeeze underneath your TV. There’s even a version with a built-in DVD drive, too.

The other option is to build your own computer – check out our guide on how to build a console-sized gaming PC for a good guide. The benefit of the second option is that you can specify the exact PC you want, so that it can even play the latest games.

There are a few things to watch out for. First, integrated graphics on Intel processors only support an HDMI 1.4 output. That means you’re restricted to 4K at a jerky 24Hz; you have to use DisplayPort to get the full 60Hz in Ultra HD. For that reason, you will need a mini PC with a dedicated graphics card that has an HDMI 2.0 output.

You don’t get a dedicated remote control with most PCs, but the control options are huge: you can use a wireless keyboard, game controller or the smartphone app, amongst others.

This is probably the most expensive method on this list, but the resulting satisfaction from having built an HTPC entirely yourself is worth the effort it takes several times over.

Kodi: the good, the bad, and the illegal

Facebook tests lasers that shoot high-speed internet through the sky – CNET

How can Facebook expand past its 2.2 billion monthly active users? Perhaps by bringing the internet to more places.

Facebook has tested one method that uses plane-mounted lasers that can shoot a high-speed internet connection through the sky, according to a February 2018 paper seen by Business Insider.

How can Facebook expand past its 2.2 billion monthly active users? Perhaps by bringing the internet to more places.

Facebook has tested one method that uses plane-mounted lasers that can shoot a high-speed internet connection through the sky, according to a February 2018 paper seen by Business Insider. With the lasers, the company was able to create a wireless link between the plane and a ground station 9 km (5.6 miles) away. Facebook confirmed these details to CNET.

Although experimental, this shows one way to send high-speed internet to remote locations. How fast is this internet? According to Facebook, it was able to create a 10-gigabit-per-second bidirectional optical link.

But Facebook can make the connection even faster with different tech. In a blog post on Wednesday, Facebook said it was able to send 40Gbps simultaneously in each direction from a location on the ground to an aircraft 7 km (4.3 miles) away. But this test uses millimeter-wave technology, not lasers.

This is part of Facebook’s continued work on developing a fast wireless internet connection that can be shot through the sky or even space. Previously, Facebook’s Aquila project used a Facebook-made high-altitude drone to beam internet to remote places. The social network recently dropped the Aquila project but is still focusing on creating faster internet connections.

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Wearable Computing: Technologies, Applications and Global Markets

However, wearable computing’s core market segment is comprised of product types that include smartwatches, fitness trackers or bands, smart eyewear and headsets, medical and health monitoring devices, smart clothing, and other devices (wearable cameras, body sensors and smart headphones).

However, wearable computing’s core market segment is comprised of product types that include smartwatches, fitness trackers or bands, smart eyewear and headsets, medical and health monitoring devices, smart clothing, and other devices (wearable cameras, body sensors and smart headphones).

The wearable computing report does not include the IT vendors or market size for software or applications (apps) used to support functioning of such devices. However, the product type segment covers only basic and smart devices that function based on the following technical attributes:

Operating System (OS) – Android, Wear OS by Google, Glass OS by Google, RTOS, Windows, Apple’s Watch OS, etc.
Technical attributes: External speaker, GPS, heart rate sensor, megapixels, microphone, skin and body temp sensor, touchscreen, UV sensor, and waterproofing.
Connectivity: Bluetooth, Wi-Fi, NFC, and 3G/4G.
Operation mode: Tethered, standalone, and both.
Furthermore, in hardware or devices, the report does not include earwear that are Bluetooth devices used only for calling purposes and listening to music.

The market is also segmented by application areas including fitness and wellness (self-monitoring devices), healthcare and medical, military and defense, infotainment, and other industrial usage.The wearable computing market is further segmented based on its adoption among end-user type including consumers and commercial or industrial users.

The scope of the study also includes major application areas of wearable computing devices, for example, all the segments of the market have been analyzed globally across North America, Europe, Asia-Pacific, and the rest of the world (RoW).

The report also provides company profile and competitive analyses of key wearable computing vendors holding the maximum share of the market. Some of the companies include Apple, Alphabet Inc., Fitbit, Garmin, Huawei, LG Electronics, Samsung, Sony, Xiaomi Technology and Lifesense Group.

Report Includes
– 29 data tables and 25 additional tables
– Detailed industry analysis of the global markets for wearable computing technologies and applications
– Analyses of global market trends, with data from 2017, estimates for 2018 and projections of compound annual growth rates (CAGRs) through 2023
– Identification and evaluation of recent technological developments, growth driving factors, industry challenges and market trends in the global wearable computing market
– Assess global market and revenue estimation for wearable computing technology by geographical regions, product types, application areas, organization size and verticals, and end user industries
– Patent evaluation, including coverage of the current state of technology, new patent applications, and newly issued patents
– Company profiles of major key players in the market, including Alphabet, Inc., Apple Inc., Sony Corp., Samsung Electronics, Seiko Epson Corp., Vuzix Corp., LG Corp., and Xiaomi Inc.

Report Scope
The study includes detailed analysis of key trends and geographic information regarding the wearable computing market and its various segments.It also emphasizes the provision of global market sizes, compounded annual growth rates (CAGR), and revenue prospects for various segments and sub-segments through 2023.

However, wearable computing’s core market segment is comprised of product types that include smartwatches, fitness trackers or bands, smart eyewear and headsets, medical and health monitoring devices, smart clothing, and other devices (wearable cameras, body sensors and smart headphones).

The wearable computing report does not include the IT vendors or market size for software or applications (apps) used to support functioning of such devices. However, the product type segment covers only basic and smart devices that function based on the following technical attributes:

Operating System (OS) – Android, Wear OS by Google, Glass OS by Google, RTOS, Windows, Apple’s Watch OS, etc.
Technical attributes: External speaker, GPS, heart rate sensor, megapixels, microphone, skin and body temp sensor, touchscreen, UV sensor, and waterproofing.
Connectivity: Bluetooth, Wi-Fi, NFC, and 3G/4G.
Operation mode: Tethered, standalone, and both.
Furthermore, in hardware or devices, the report does not include earwear that are Bluetooth devices used only for calling purposes and listening to music.

The market is also segmented by application areas including fitness and wellness (self-monitoring devices), healthcare and medical, military and defense, infotainment, and other industrial usage.The wearable computing market is further segmented based on its adoption among end-user type including consumers and commercial or industrial users.

The scope of the study also includes major application areas of wearable computing devices, for example, all the segments of the market have been analyzed globally across North America, Europe, Asia-Pacific, and the rest of the world (RoW).

The report also provides company profile and competitive analyses of key wearable computing vendors holding the maximum share of the market. Some of the companies include Apple, Alphabet Inc., Fitbit, Garmin, Huawei, LG Electronics, Samsung, Sony, Xiaomi Technology and Lifesense Group.

Report Includes
– 29 data tables and 25 additional tables
– Detailed industry analysis of the global markets for wearable computing technologies and applications
– Analyses of global market trends, with data from 2017, estimates for 2018 and projections of compound annual growth rates (CAGRs) through 2023
– Identification and evaluation of recent technological developments, growth driving factors, industry challenges and market trends in the global wearable computing market
– Assess global market and revenue estimation for wearable computing technology by geographical regions, product types, application areas, organization size and verticals, and end user industries
– Patent evaluation, including coverage of the current state of technology, new patent applications, and newly issued patents
– Company profiles of major key players in the market, including Alphabet, Inc., Apple Inc., Sony Corp., Samsung Electronics, Seiko Epson Corp., Vuzix Corp., LG Corp., and Xiaomi Inc.

Read the full report: https://www.reportlinker.com/p02042684

About Reportlinker
ReportLinker is an award-winning market research solution. Reportlinker finds and organizes the latest industry data so you get all the market research you need – instantly, in one place.

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Brave advances browser privacy with Tor-powered tabs – CNET

Want more online privacy? Brave, the ad-blocking browser, has a new way to get it on the web.

A new version of the browser released Thursday adds technology called onion routing from the Tor Project as an option to its private tabs.

Want more online privacy? Brave, the ad-blocking browser, has a new way to get it on the web.

A new version of the browser released Thursday adds technology called onion routing from the Tor Project as an option to its private tabs. Tor helps keep you anonymous by shuttling your internet communications a network of computers that obscures your true address on the internet, making it much harder for a website to know you visited.

You might think the Tor Project is the kind of thing that appeals mostly to criminals, tinfoil-hat paranoids and spies. Indeed, the US Naval Research Laboratory came up with the onion-routing technology, and the project says, “A branch of the US Navy uses Tor for open-source intelligence gathering, and one of its teams used Tor while deployed in the Middle East recently.”

But as the Facebook scandal over Cambridge Analytica’s data harvesting has shown, privacy is something ordinary people are concerned about, too.

“This is not a blip. You’re seeing a rising consciousness about privacy,” said Brave Chief Executive Brendan Eich. “We’re playing a long game here. We’re putting energy on the side of privacy, and part of that involves energy on the hard case. Tor is the hard case.”

The Tor private tabs feature, first reported by CNET a year ago, is built into Brave 0.23. The official Brave 1.0 is due to ship this year, but 2.8 million people already use the browser monthly, Eich said. To use the new feature, you can either select “New Private Tab with Tor” from the file menu or flip on the Tor switch once you’ve opened a new private tab. Using Tor on one tab doesn’t affect other ordinary or private tabs.

Tor has downsides. It’s significantly slower, and some features like video streaming don’t work well or at all. And some network-monitoring software mistakes Tor traffic for an automated attack, periodically requiring Tor users to prove they’re human with a Captcha.

But Tor can be worth it. Among those potentially interested — along with intelligence agents — are activists fearing surveillance by oppressive governments, people trying to bypass censors, anyone wishing to give law enforcement or journalists a truly anonymous tip, businesspeople trying to avoid revealing details about their company’s computer systems while traveling, shoppers trying not to reveal indications of what they might want to buy, and people who just don’t their internet service provider to know and potentially sell information about what websites you visit.

More Tor-powered browser choices

Tor offers its own browser, a product based on Mozilla’s open-source Firefox, but Brave is the first conventional browser to have Tor abilities built in. It won’t be the last, though. Mozilla tightened its alliance with Tor in 2016 through a project called Tor Uplift, and now it’s also begun headed down a similar path as Brave with Project Fusion.

“We decided to strengthen our collaboration by integrating Tor functionality directly into Firefox,” said Peter Dolanjski, a Firefox product manager. “This collaboration brings two benefits: it speeds up development for Tor and also allows Firefox to bring cutting-edge privacy enhancing technology to more users.”

Mozilla says it’s too early to know when the project will bear fruit. But Brave’s Tor support is here now — although in a testing stage to try to find problems and patch known privacy leaks compared to Tor’s better-tested browser.

“We’re honest about the fact that we’re not the Tor browser. It has a much higher level of security testing,” said Brave Chief Information Security Officer Yan Zhu. “If you’re using it because your life depends on it, you should be using Tor and not Brave with Tor tabs.”

The Tor private tabs in Brave are available only in the versions for Windows, MacOS and Windows personal computers, but Brave plans to bring it to its browsers for Apple iPhones and for phones powered by Google’s Android software.

Building a better private tab

You may think from the icons some browsers use for private tabs — a mask for Mozilla’s Firefox, a spy hat and sunglasses for Google’s Chrome — that browsers keep your identity secret with their private-browsing modes.

But websites can still track you to some degree, most notably by logging your Internet Protocol address, the number your computer uses to send and receive data. That reveals a lot of information to prying eyes.

Studies show that users expect private tabs prevent things like ISPs tracking them or other people on Wi-Fi tracking them,” but in fact ordinary private tabs don’t, Zhu said. “Tor private tabs bring private tabs much closer to what the user expects private tabs to do.”

Tor, which originally stood for The Onion Router, is named for a way to protect information being sent over a network. When your browser makes a request to download a webpage with Tor, the request is encrypted multiple times for a journey that detours through three servers called relays.

Each relay strips away a layer of onion skin, so to speak, to get further instructions about where to send the data. Each relay knows the addresses of the computers only one step to either side along the communication path. That means the final relay — called an exit relay — doesn’t know your original internet address as it communicates with the website.

Not only that, but Tor changes the pathway every 10 minutes.

New traffic jams on the Tor network?

Tor is already somewhat sluggish, though Eich says it’s improved dramatically over the last year. There’s a risk, though, that new traffic from Brave will slow it further.

Brave, though, has added four of its own Tor relays to the network and plans to add more, Zhu said.

“Tor doesn’t want us to run a lot of relays. They want to have network diversity,” she said. But Brave also could donate to an organization that runs a pool of Tor relays. “Ideally we would contribute more than enough bandwidth.”

The Tor Project itself welcomes the company.

Tor private tabs “will provide better protections to Brave users against network surveillance, making it more difficult for ISPs, employers or guest Wi-Fi providers to track and subsequently sell user data,” the project said in a statement. “It’s good to see more mainstream browsers taking an interest in trying to meet people’s privacy expectations.”

Tech Enabled: CNET chronicles tech’s role in providing new kinds of accessibility.

Follow the Money: This is how digital cash is changing the way we save, shop and work.

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IDG Contributor Network: The ‘made up’ jargon of networking

Like any industry, networking has a proprietary slew of acronyms and jargon that only insiders understand. Look no further than Network World’s searchable glossary of wireless terms.

Turns out, multiplexing has nothing to do with going to the movies at a place with more than one theater.

Like any industry, networking has a proprietary slew of acronyms and jargon that only insiders understand. Look no further than Network World’s searchable glossary of wireless terms.

Turns out, multiplexing has nothing to do with going to the movies at a place with more than one theater.

I also like to think that each networker has their own favorite list of terms, ready to share at a moment’s notice during family dinners, holidays and networking events … or maybe that’s just me?

[ Check out our hands-on reviews: 5 top hardware-based Wi-Fi test tools and Mojo wireless intrusion prevention system. ]

In any case, networking can easily sound like a foreign language, and translating the ins and outs of complex technology for the general public is what this blog is all about. Affectionately called the “made up” words of networking, here are a few of my favorite terms, and why they matter for our hyper-connected world:

Envelope tracking: Ask your local mailman

This joke practically writes itself. Envelope tracking is not a new service from the United States Postal Service, but an innovative technology for better mobile device battery life. Use of mobile devices and mobile data consumption is increasing drastically around the globe. According to Cisco, monthly global mobile data traffic will reach 49 exabytes by 2021, and annual traffic with exceed half a zettabyte.

Check out ITWorld to learn how big a zettabyte really is.

However, sending all this information is not easy for devices and their RF solutions designed for portability. Higher data rates often mean more power consumption. While yesterday’s power management methods are useful, they aren’t equipped to handle the amount of mobile data shared today.

Envelope tracking is an RF technology that uses data transmission information to make the most efficient use of battery power. Inside a mobile device, power is sent to what is called a “power amplifier,” which increases the power of an RF signal as it is transmitted from a cellphone to a cell tower. Envelope tracking constantly adjusts the amount of power applied to the cellphone’s power amplifier, so it doesn’t have to work as hard – and keeps it operating at peak efficiency. The result is less heat, longer battery life, improved signal quality, extended network coverage and this great Qorvo video.

Fully autonomous driving: The latest FAD

Speaking of jokes that write themselves … FAD, or fully autonomous driving, is the technical term for a vehicle capable of sensing its environment and navigating without human input. It is also commonly referred to as a driverless car, self-driving car or connected car.

FAD offers many advantages, including improved fuel economy, increased safety features, and using travel time for entertainment and work. Autonomy will progressively transform the car into a platform from which occupants can use their transit time for personal activities, which could include the use of novel forms of media and services.

Gartner expects multiple launches of autonomous vehicles around 2020. However, the full impact of autonomous vehicle technology on society and the economy will not begin to emerge until approximately 2025. Read more about the factors “driving” adoption of autonomous vehicles in Connected Car For Dummies®.

As a techie, I appreciate the FAD. But as a gearhead, I hope they’ll let me keep my muscle cars.

Millimeter wave: What ants surf on

According to the Network World glossary, “Millimeter waves are the portion of the electromagnetic spectrum from 30 GHz to 300 GHz. These are much more directional than microwaves, but, thanks to advances in electronics, are increasingly being applied (up to around 90 GHz., anyway) in fixed and an increasing number of mobile applications as well. Once requiring exotic and expensive electronic technologies, millimeter waves can now be generated with inexpensive electronic components, increasing their availability, reliability and utilization.”

There’s been quite a kerfuffle over how to abbreviate millimeter wave. Today, you’ll see mmW or mmWave, and MMW and MMWAVE (for fans of the Caps Lock key), among others. Follow your heart, but here we’ll use mmW.

mmW is most relevant for wireless infrastructure applications. Higher frequency mmW bands are expected to expand network capacity and support 5G speeds of up to 10Gbps. These mmW bands operate over shorter ranges than lower frequency bands, meaning we can use them for residential and commercial deployments of applications like small cells.

MU-MIMO: The sound a mechanical cow makes

I share this favorite made up word with the world’s greatest gadget tech reviewer, Keith Shaw, who wrote on Network World earlier this year: “The only thing techies love more than creating acronyms is the chance to create even longer ones.”

Couldn’t agree more, Keith.

Wi-Fi was initially one-to-one – a single stream, with a single user communicating to a router. Anyone with roommates or family members under the same roof knows this is no longer the case, and so we have MU-MIMO. MU-MIMO stands for multi-user, multiple input, multiple output, and is designed for situations where multiple users are connecting to a single router at the same time. It has spawned routers that look like something out of Men in Black.

Seriously, look it up.

Keith notes that MU-MIMO technologies are expanding with the rollout of 802.11ax, the next evolution of the 802.11 Wi-Fi standard. Under 802.11ax and the next generation of Wi-Fi, multiple users can upload and download files with better throughput and 25 percent higher capacity than the current Wi-Fi standard, 802.11ac.

Networking can be complicated. But keep these made up words in your back pocket, and you’ll have an easier time answering the proverbial question, “so, what do you do for work, again?”

Have a favorite #NetworkingMadeUpWord? Be sure to share it in the comments, and with us on social at @NetworkWorld and @QorvoInc.

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Join the Network World communities on Facebook and LinkedIn to comment on topics that are top of mind.

Ultimate set-top boxes for World Cup recordings

The 2018 World Cup is currently being broadcast on BBC and ITV channels. This is great news as we don’t have to pay for an expensive subscription to watch a match, just the standard TV license fee.

The 2018 World Cup is currently being broadcast on BBC and ITV channels. This is great news as we don’t have to pay for an expensive subscription to watch a match, just the standard TV license fee.

However, that doesn’t mean it’ll be easy to catch all the World Cup 2018 games that you want to. Even if you don’t have a day job.

The solution? A PVR, a set-top box that will record them for you. Their popularity has dwindled over the years as more of us hooked onto catch-up and streaming services like Netflix. But they are the best way to make sure you don’t miss any of the action during the 2018 World Cup.

Here are the models you should check out.

Humax FVP-5000T

Humax is one of the main names in the world of PVRs. Put a FVP-5000T under your TV and you have one of the best hubs for home entertainment money can buy.

There are three models to choose from. The entry-level model has a 500GB hard drive, but there are 1TB and 2TB versions if that is just not enough for your TV habit.

A multi-tuner array lets you record up to four programmes (or matches) at once and the 2TB Humax FVP-5000T can store a massive 500 hours of HD content. Or 1000 at SD quality.

The Humax Live TV app for iOS and Android also lets you set recordings using your phone, and even stream TV to it directly.

As it uses Freeview Play, the Humax FVP-5000T lets you access all the major UK catch-up services, as well as Netflix and YouTube.

Humax HDR-1100S

Is the Freeview signal weak in your area? You need a Freesat PVR like the Humax HDR-1100S. This uses a satellite dish instead of a standard antenna to receive the TV signal.

Integrated Wi-Fi also lets you access catch-up services, plus YouTube and Netflix.

Like the Humax FVP-5000T you have a choice of 500GB, 1TB and 2TB models. You just have to decide how much you want to store. Want to keep the entire 2018 World Cup for posterity, including all the pre-match prattle? Look for the 1TB version.

You can record two programmes at once using the Humax HDR-1100S, and check out the TV guide and set recordings using the Freesat phone app.

Panasonic DMR-HWT250EB

The Panasonic DMR-HWT250EB is a sleek-looking alternative to the Humax FVP-5000T. But what’s different?

It’s a Freeview Play and Freeview HD recorder, so you get the same channels and the same access to secondary services like YouTube and Netflix. It only lets you record two programmes at once rather than four, but also has a few extra tricks.

The Panasonic DMR-HWT250EB can play 4K video through its USB port, a great extra for those with 4K TVs. It also has special long play recording modes that chip down the amount of room World Cup matches with take up.

You can fit up to 684 hours of HD content on its 1TB hard drive, instead of the 259 hours you’ll get directly capturing the Freeview HD feed.

BT YouView+

You might guess you’ll need some sort of subscription to use a BT YouView+ box, but you don’t.

YouView is an alternative to Freeview Play, an interface that combines normal Freeview channels with streaming services. These include Netflix, Amazon Prime Video and YouTube.

If you want to dig deeper you can get the YouView+ box as part of a BT TV subscription, which unlocks access to extra channels like BT Sport and Comedy Central.

However, for the World Cup fans out there one of the main appeals of the BT YouView+ box is its low price when bought solo. At just £125 this is a bit of a bargain.

It “only” has a 500GB hard drive, which can store 300 hours in SD quality or 125 in HD. But that just means you’ll have to juggle your recordings library more. For the tech-heads out there, this box is actually made by PVR master Humax.

There’s also an Ultra HD version of the YouView+ box, for those with 4K TVs.

Sky Q

If you want the best TV recording experience, check out Sky Q. This may be overkill if all you want to do is watch the World Cup. But once you’ve tried this service, it’s hard to go back.

Sky Q lets you watch TV and recordings on your phone or tablet, and stream content to other Sky boxes around the house. It’s the multi-room PVR.

Get the top-end 2TB Ultra HD Sky Q box and you can record a massive six programmes at once while watching a seventh. You get a high-tech Bluetooth remote too.

There is, of course, a bigger investment involved than with a standard set-top box, though. You’ll pay £20 a month for the basic Sky TV package and the top-end PVR box of dreams comes with a £199 up-front setup cost. A Sky Sports sub costs an additional £20 a month, if the BBC and ITV coverage does not quite sate your sports appetite.

But Sky Q really is something special.

Virgin Media TiVO

If Sky looks too pricey to you, Virgin Media is your other subscription option. All Virgin Media TV packages now come with an advanced Virgin Media TiVO V6 box.

It’s significantly better than most stand-alone set-top PVRs. First, it can record six programmes at once (and lets you watch a seventh). It’ll play Netflix and YouTube at 4K resolution and the 1TB hard drive can store 500 hours of SD TV, or 100 at HD quality.

You can stream TV and recordings to a phone or tablet too.

But is it that much cheaper than Sky Q? You’ll pay £22 a month for the basic Mix TV package, which offers 150 channels including Sky One, Fox, and of course the terrestrial channels we need for the World Cup. There’s a £20 “set up” fee too, but that’s a lot less than the £199 you’ll pay for Sky’s Ultra HD 2TB box.

TechRadar’s World Cup coverage is brought to you in association with Honor.

EcoNet Unveils Premium Flagship EN7580 10G xPON SoC Equipped with Network Accelerators

Moreover, EN7580 enables operators, who wish to extend their GPON/EPON services across and into 10G xPON services, to achieve the goal in the most efficient and economical way. “Due to the growing demand for higher bandwidth from telecom operators, EcoNet is escalating network connectivity services to a higher level,” said Bomin Wang, CEO at EcoNet.

Moreover, EN7580 enables operators, who wish to extend their GPON/EPON services across and into 10G xPON services, to achieve the goal in the most efficient and economical way. “Due to the growing demand for higher bandwidth from telecom operators, EcoNet is escalating network connectivity services to a higher level,” said Bomin Wang, CEO at EcoNet. “By equipping network accelerators and with a wide range support for multiple protocols, operators can reap the benefits of significant power-saving architecture, non-blocking networking performance, and high C/P ratio of EN7580. We believe EN7580 is an ideal next-generation solution for the fiber market and our unique, industry-leading, low-power design will also make a substantial contribution to our environment.”

Key Features of EcoNet EN7580 SoC

The fifth generation PON processor building upon EcoNet field-proven architecture Integrated XPA allows both IPv4 and IPv6 wire-speed routing at up to 10Gbit/s in bi-direction with CPU full offload Integrated SWA supports ax/ac/11n Wi-Fi traffic transmission. Take MT7615 4x4n+4x4ac bi-direction rate Wi-Fi solution for example, speed up to 1.7Gbps and result in more than 70% savings in CPU High level of integration includes Dual-core 1.3Ghz CPU, multi-Gigabit Ethernet LAN ports, 10/5/2.5/1G Ethernet via XFI/HSGMII interface, USB, PCIe, IPSec engine, secure boot, multi-line VoIP and multi-port UART for rich home automation applications Best-in-class innovative low power design consumes at least up to 40% less power than most 10G xPON SoC in the market Original single DRAM design for both symmetric and asymmetric 10G xPON drastically reduces ODM/operator R&D development cost

About EcoNet

EcoNet is a subsidiary of MediaTek Inc. and a market leader in developing SoC for broadband networks including xPON/xDSL and Ethernet Switch solutions. EcoNet keeps offering a broad, innovative, and next-generation semiconductor product portfolio for leading broadband vendors and operators.

Media Contact:

Gilb Yang
Phone: +886-3-6008566
Email: Gilb.Yang@econet-inc.com

Cision View original content:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/econet-unveils-premium-flagship-en7580-10g-xpon-soc-equipped-with-network-accelerators-300673897.html

SOURCE EcoNet

Společnost Borgward se vrací do Německa

– Borgward konsoliduje nové obchodní modely v oblasti prodeje a služeb

– Komplexní služby ve spolupráci se strategickým partnerem A.T.U.

– Úspora nákladů pro zákazníky

Společnost Borgward Group AG se připravuje na zahájení provozu v Německu: tato automobilová společnost se sídlem ve Stuttgartu uzavřela partnerství s předním německým řetězcem opraven A.T.U.

– Borgward konsoliduje nové obchodní modely v oblasti prodeje a služeb

– Komplexní služby ve spolupráci se strategickým partnerem A.T.U.

– Úspora nákladů pro zákazníky

Společnost Borgward Group AG se připravuje na zahájení provozu v Německu: tato automobilová společnost se sídlem ve Stuttgartu uzavřela partnerství s předním německým řetězcem opraven A.T.U. “Naše spolupráce je důležitým mezníkem v našem návratu do Německa. Ve společnosti A.T.U jsme našli toho pravého partnera pro zavedení našeho nového servisního modelu, který nám pomůže k úspěšnému nástupu na trh,” řekl Tom Anliker, viceprezident společnosti Borgward Group AG pro marketing, prodej a služby, v pondělí ve Stuttgartu. “Firmy Borgward a A.T.U společně vytvořily zcela nový systém služeb a připravují ho k uvedení na trh. Tím jsme položili základy pro profesionální služby, které budeme po celém Německu pro vozidla společnosti Borgward zajišťovat,” řekl o strategickém partnerství Andreas Schmidt, ředitel firmy A.T.U. pro služby a technologie.

– Křížový odkaz: Obrázek je k dispozici prostřednictvím agentury AP Images (http://www.apimages.com) –

Současně tato automobilka se sídlem ve Stuttgartu zveřejnila cenu svého prémiového modelu v Německu: plně vybavený sportovní vůz Borgward BX7 TS Limited Edition SUV si nyní můžete objednat za cenu 44 200 Eur (včetně 19% DPH, cena bez DPH činí 37 142,86 Eur).

Spolupráce s firmou A.T.U a přímý online marketing jsou hlavními součástmi inovativního konceptu služeb a prodeje firmy Borgward. “Díky naší strategii se stáváme průkopníky v německém automobilovém průmyslu. Hned od počátku chceme jednoznačně oddělit prodeje a servis a hledat nové příležitosti. Zákazník je pro nás na prvním místě, a proto se snažíme postupovat tímto způsobem,” dodal Tom Anliker.

Široká paleta služeb a cenová úspora pro zákazníky firmy Borgward

Společnost Borgward analyzovala stávající obchodní modely, požadavky zákazníků a trendy v ostatních sektorech. Výsledkem našich analýz je, že zákazníci očekávají jednoduchý a transparentní nákupní proces bez skrytých nákladů a řekli nám, že by s velkou radostí uvítali i prodeje online. Navíc očekávají spolehlivou a snadno dostupnou síť opraven a dílen.

Zásady společnosti Borgward se těmito požadavky řídí: v prodeji se snažíme chytře spojit online prodej s prodejem v kamenných prodejnách. Naše střediska pro zkušební jízdy, mobilní prodejní týmy, přímé dodávky zákazníkům a další akce doplňují online prodej. Společnost Borgward má navíc zájem uzavírat další partnerské smlouvy. Podmínkou je, aby potenciální partneři podporovali obchodní model založený na přímém online marketingu. “Díky tomuto novému obchodnímu modelu dokážeme rychle a flexibilně reagovat na neustálé změny v chování zákazníků. Navíc jsou naše služby dobře dostupné a nabízí zákazníkům značné úspory, zejména v nákladech na servis a práci. Zákazníci tak získávají hned několik výhod: modely našich vozů, jako je například Borgward BX7 TS Limited Edition si navrhujeme sami, a za podstatně nižší cenu než konkurence (při srovnatelné výbavě) a navíc zákazníkům nabízíme další výhody v podobě úspor nákladů na údržbu,” dodal Tom Anliker.

Díky spolupráci s firmou A.T.U tak našim zákazníkům dáváme možnost ušetřit peníze, protože používají vysoce kvalitní náhradní díly, schválené firmou Borgward, které jsou stejně kvalitní jako originální náhradní díly, účtují menší hodinovou sazbu než většina značkových servisů a mají také rozsáhlou síť provozoven po celé zemi.

“Ihned po zahájení prodeje tedy značka Borgward bude moci zákazníkům nabídnout servis v 577 pobočkách firmy A.T.U v Německu. Tato skvělá spolupráce zaručuje vysokou kvalitu prohlídek, oprav i záručních oprav, které probíhají přesně v souladu s pokyny výrobce,” říká výkonný ředitel společnosti pro Evropu, Gerald Lautenschläger. V rámci sítě A.T.U vznikne 8 technických středisek a 30 dalších center se speciálně vyškolenými techniky pro vozy firmy Borgward. V těchto střediscích budou dostupné všechny servisní služby, včetně těch vysoce specializovaných. Ve všech ostatních provozovnách firmy A.T.U si zákazníci firmy Borkward budou moci objednat například výměnu pneumatik a v průběhu následujících let i specializovaný servis a údržbu svých vozů.

Ani cesty do sousedních evropských zemí nebudou problémem. “Naši zákazníci se mohou spolehnout na spolehlivost modelové řady vozů Borgward. Koncept mobility, který jsme vytvořili ve spolupráci s organizací ADAC zajišťuje, že o naše zákazníky bude dobře postaráno v celé Evropě,” dodal Lautenschläger.

Centrální sklad firmy A.T.U bude náhradní díly dodávat po celém Německu do 24 hodin, díky své vlastní logistické infrastruktuře. Navíc firma A.T.U bude pro automobilku Borgward zajišťovat i další služby, jako je například linka pomoci zákazníkům, specializované technické služby a školení.

Firma dnes ve Stuttgartu zahájila přímý online prodej a nabízí exkluzivní nabídku limitované edice modelové řady Borgward BX7 TS Limited Edition.

Zájemci mohou získat další informace na webových stránkách http://www.borgward.com, telefonním čísle 0800/2498888 nebo prostřednictvím e-mailu na de-service@borgward.com.

Společnost Borgward nabízí čtyřletou záruku (max. 120 tisíc km) a čtyřleté asistenční služby Euro-Assistance spolu se zárukou mobility ADAC.

Plně vybavené vozy s řadou skvělých vychytávek

Vozy modelové řady Borgward BX7 TS Limited Edition byly vyvinuty pro pohodlné řízení a potěšení z jízdy. Kromě inteligentního pohonu všech čtyř kol jsou také vybaveny nejmodernějším systémem přímého vstřikování paliva a čtyřválcovým motorem o výkonu 165 kW (224 HP) s maximálním kroutícím momentem 300 Nm. Vůz splňuje emisní normu Euro 6b a má energetický štítek E. Spotřeba paliva je 11,7 / 7,3 / 8,9 l/100 km (město / mimo město / kombinovaná jízda), emise CO2 jsou pak 277 / 174 / 212 g/km (město / mimo město / kombinovaná jízda).

Vozy Borgward BX7 TS Limited Edition dále vynikají špičkovou výbavou, online infotainmentem CARL Connect, skvělými bezpečnostními prvky a plnou výbavou a příslušenstvím. Přehled nejdůležitější výbavy a technické informace najdete níže *:

Vnější výbava

– Otevírání a startování bez klíče

– Xenonové světlomety v tmavém provedení, LED světlomety pro jízdu ve dne, směrová světla, automatické rozsvícení světel, funkce následuj mě domů (follow me home)

– Panoramatické výklopné a posuvné střešní okno

– Zatmavená tepelně izolovaná skla s UV filtrem v celém voze

– 4 elektricky ovládaná okna

– Dešťový senzor

– Elektricky nastavitelná sklopná a vyhřívaná zpětný zrcátka s automatickým ztmavením a integrovaným obrysovým osvětlením

Balíček TS – vnější výbava:

– Barva šedá matná (metalická) se speciálními efekty

– 18-palcová kola z lehké slitiny v provedení TS

– Systém kontroly tlaku v pneumatikách

– Aerodynamické střešní pásy a spojler v provedení TS (není vhodné pro instalaci střešních nosičů)

– Kosočtvercová mřížka

– Boční ozdobné panely

– Podběhy kol v barvě vozu

– Přední a zadní zástěrky, zadní s integrovanými tlumiči hluku

– Loga TS na přední mřížce a dveřích zavazadlového prostoru

Vnitřní a funkční výbava

Bezpečnostní systém B-Safety se stabilní bezpečnostní buňkou pro cestující, předdefinované deformační zóny vpředu a vzadu, ochrana proti bočním nárazům; čelní a boční airbag řidiče a čelní airbag spolujezdce, záclonové airbagy pro obě řadami sedadel

Asistenční balíček pro řidiče s korekcí mrtvého bodu a varováním před únavou.

Sklopná zadní sedadla rozdělená v poměru 40:60, vyhřívaná a vybavená systémem ISOFIX pro upevnění dětských sedaček.

Sklopná střední loketní opěrka s úložným prostorem a integrovanými držáky nápojů, 12 V zásuvka pro nabíjení

Dvouzónová klimatizace se snímačem kvality vzduchu a pylovým filtrem, další možnost nastavení teploty a větrání v zadní části vozu

Nastavitelná loketní opěrka vpředu s integrovaným osvětleným úložným prostorem a 12 V nabíjecí zásuvkou

Plachta na zakrytí nákladu uložená pod podlahou zavazadlového prostoru

Podsvícení

4 elektricky ovládaná okna

Systém CARL infotainment (Connect Online Infotainment System):

– Dotyková obrazovka 12,3 palců s ovládacími prvky, možnost hlasového ovládání

– FM RDS/AM rádio, DAB+ rádio, MP3 přehrávač

– Navigace s dopravními informacemi v reálném čase

– Přípojka pro chytré telefony (Apple CarPlay & Android Auto), Bluetooth(R), 2 x USB, 1 x AUX-IN

– 4G komunikační systém: Wi-Fi hotspot, online přehrávání hudby, internetové rádio, online informace o počasí

– Aplikace pro chytré telefony: Stav vozidla / Dálkové ovládání oken a zamykání vozidla

– Hi-Fi zvukový systém s 10 reproduktory

– 360° kamera s různými možnostmi zobrazení na 12,3 palcovém displeji, parkovací asistent s nákresem dráhy (trajektorie)

– Tempomat

Balíček TS – vnitřní výbava:

– Palubní deska s TFT displejem a fotorealistickým zobrazením

– Kožené polstrování se speciálním lichoběžníkovým stehem na sedadlech a dveřích

– Sportovní, vyhřívané sedadla: elektricky nastavitelné sedadlo řidiče (8 poloh) / elektricky nastavené bederní opěrky (4 polohy), elektricky nastavitelná sedadla cestujících (4 polohy) / elektricky nastavitelné bederní opěrky (4 polohy)

– Plynule nastavitelný multifunkční volant s koženým potahem

– Individuálně navržený středový panel s logem TS

– Možnost individuálního výběru stylu řadící páky

– Sportovní pedály

– Tmavé střešní obložení

– TS pásky z korozivzdorné oceli

* Předběžné údaje, při uvedení na trh se mohou změnit

Technické údaje vozu BX7 TS Limited Edition*

Podvozek / rozměry Borgward BX7 TS Limited Edition – pětidveřové, pětimístné SUV, samonosná lehká vyztužená náprava s bezpečnostní buňkou pro cestující, přední a zadní deformační zóny tlumící energii nárazu, Model ochrana proti bočním nárazům Délka v mm / Šířka v mm / Výška v mm / Rozvor v mm / Rozchod přední / zadní nápravy v mm / Objem zavazadlového prostoru v litrech min/max ** 4 715 / 1 923 / 1 690 / 2 760 / 1 610 / 1 610 Kombinovaná hmotnost / Hmotnost nákladu / Povolená pohotovostní hmotnost / Objem zavazadlového prostoru v litrech min/max ** 1 854 / 387 / 2 241 / 545 / 1 377 Záruka 4 roky / 120 000 km Pohon / Výkon Motor z lehké slitiny se čtyřmi válci v řadě za sebou s vysokotlakým přímým vstřikováním paliva s piezo vstřikovači, turbodmychadlo s chladičem Typ motoru / počet nasávaného vzduchu, variabilní ovládání ventilů, válců EGR Zdvihový objem válců v cm3 / Vrtání x Zdvih v mm / Výkon v kW (PS) / otáčky za minutu / Maximální kroutící moment v Nm / otáčky za minutu / Emisní norma / Energetický štítek / Objem nádrže 1981 / 82 x 93,8 / 165 (224) 5 500 / 300 / 1 500 v litrech – 4 500 / EU 6b / E / 60 Pohon na všechny 4 kola s elektronicky ovládanými spojkovými talíři, ESP (R), protiprokluzový Pohon systém Převodovka Šestirychlostní s měničem kroutícího momentu Zrychlení z 0 na 100 km/h v s 9,4 Vmax v km/h 208 1/100 km NEDC Mimo město / Město / Kombinovaný provoz 11,7 / 7,3 / 8,9 Emise CO2 v g/km Mimo město / Město / Kombinovaný provoz 277 / 174 / 212 Podvozek / Brzdy MacPherson, s vidlicovými rameny, vzpěrami, vinutými pružinami, plynovými tlumiči a Přední náprava stabilizátorem Víceprvková náprava, vinuté pružiny, plynové Zadní náprava tlumiče Kotoučové brzdy s interně větranými kotouči na všech kolech, ABS, EBD, posilovač brzd, Brzdový systém elektronická parkovací brzda, Auto Hold Řízení Elektromechanické hřebenové řízení 7,5 J x 18 / 235/60 R 18 W, systém kontroly tlaku Kola / Pneumatiky v pneumatikách

* Předběžné údaje, při uvedení na trh se mohou změnit

** Podle VDA

Další informace
Marco Dalan
ředitel pro komunikaci
Email: marco.dalan@borgward.com
Telefon: +49-711-365101041
http://www.borgward.com
BORGWARD Group AG
Kriegsbergstrasse 11
70174 Stuttgart
Axel Lengert
ředitel pro produktovou komunikaci
Email: axel.lengert@borgward.com
Telefon: +49-711-365101045
http://www.borgward.com

SOURCE BORGWARD Group AG

How What3words pinpoints every spot on Earth for better navigation (Q&A) – CNET

When it comes to navigation, we live in an age of miracles. Speak a few words to your phone and it’ll lead you to your friend’s house.

But there’s still room for improvement.

When it comes to navigation, we live in an age of miracles. Speak a few words to your phone and it’ll lead you to your friend’s house.

But there’s still room for improvement.

How do you tell your sister where to meet at the concert festival? Where along that dirt road is the trailhead? Today’s navigation systems often rely on street addresses, but plenty of locations don’t have one. Some countries have poorly developed postal codes, and even modern countries like France — inventor of the metric system, no less — doesn’t always use street addresses, as I discovered trying to find rental houses on a vacation to Corsica.

That’s why there’s a startup called What3Words. The 70-person company labels each 10-foot-square patch of the planet with three words — 57 trillion squares altogether. For example, the front door of CNET’s headquarters is at decreased.mime.crab, but the loading dock for package delivery is epic.noses.upgrading. The result: an easier way to direct people to your location without the jumble of numerical coordinates.

The technology is being built into the official postal system in countries like Mongolia, Ivory Coast and Nigeria, and Mercedes, an investor, is incorporating What3Words navigation into its cars.

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And more allies are on the way. On Thursday, What3words announced a new investment from SAIC Motor, China’s largest carmaker, and from Alpine Electronics, which makes radios and navigation systems for cars. Other earlier investors include navigation companies TomTom and Sygic, German train operator Deutsche Bahn, Dubai-based shipping firm Aramex, and Intel Capital.

Chief Executive Chris Sheldrick founded the London-based company after navigation problems of his own. He sat down down to discuss What3words with CNET’s Stephen Shankland. The following is an edited transcript of the discussion.

Q: Why did you found What3words, and what do you do?
Sheldrick: I founded the business because I used to work in the music industry and everyone got lost trying to find the gigs that I was organizing. I tried to get people to use latitude and longitude — eight digits for latitude, eight digits for longitude — but found it was very un-consumer friendly. A truck driver mixed up a 4 and a 5 and ended up an hour north of Rome instead of an hour south. The idea was how can we compress this latitude and longitude into something simple for consumers?

We found that there were enough combinations of three words that you could just sign a unique three-word combination to every 3-meter by 3-meter square — a 10-foot by 10-foot square — in the world. That felt like it was easy enough that everyone in the world, from a child to a grandparent, could use it.

The way people use What3words right now, is mostly with an app, where you type in that three-word locator and it will navigate you to it, or you find out a spot’s three-word locator and share it, right?
Sheldrick: That’s right. For the first five years, it’s been predominantly about using a three-word address in the What3words app. The long-term goal is to get people using a three-word address in all of the services they use in everyday life and become less and less reliant on the What3words app.

You have some partnerships. Where might people run into this in the real world?
Sheldrick: There’s a whole series of apps that people use, like the Beeline app for cyclists, or Navmii, the world’s biggest offline navigation app. These are fairly straightforward, you just put the three-word address in and it takes you to that 3-meter square. What we’ve started doing is expanding out into post and logistics. Organizations want to deliver stuff very accurately to somewhere, but a lot of the time are in countries where where addresses just don’t exist. Take Aramex, the biggest courier in the Middle East. We’re working in Saudi Arabia where addresses are few and far between. You can put a three-word address into an e-commerce site, then Aramex will deliver it to your front door using your three-word address. The Mongolian postal service is our first government client. It’s a big country but with not many addresses. You can now put three words onto an envelope, post it, and the Mongolian postal service will take it where you want.

What we’re now expanding into is the next generation of mobility. Every Mercedes car with their latest navigation system has What3words in it as standard. Voice recognition is the key use case. You say, “Hey Mercedes, take me to table.chair.spoon,” and it will navigate there — no awkward moving of a dial or other ways of putting in an address.

Once the cars become more autonomous, with no steering wheel and no pedals, it really matters what your destination is because you can’t move the car. You can’t do what you do now, where the car says you’ve arrived, then you look around and see [your destination] is around the corner. If drone delivery is going to happen, you’re going to need to tell it exactly where to go.

So if you want a package on your back porch versus your front porch, then What3words has sufficient precision?
Sheldrick: If the [navigation mapping] pin drops in the middle of your roof, that’s not going to work. An address totally ceases to become usable. A company called DXC Technology has made an app with Alexa where they say, “Hey, Alexa, tell the drone to go to word.word.word” and the drone will then go there.

Here in the US, most people have addresses, and I think a lot of people aren’t going to see this as a problem. Can you give examples of things you can do that you can’t do with a street address?
Sheldrick: When you go outside the towns and cities for anything in rural areas, addresses will let you down and What3words would help you. When you are in towns and cities, you can give the precise entrance to buildings. Every time I go to somewhere in San Francisco, I’m always standing at the wrong entrance. Sure, I’ll get there in a bit, but it’s 2018, I should get there the first time.

If you’re using a voice assistant, you’ll know the problem of trying to speak an address to the voice assistant and having problems with duplicated street names in a nearby area. Any concert venue or music festival where you’ve got a large area, it’s exactly the same thing — it’s which entrance, which car park, the grassy bit near the tree by the stage.

How do you guys make money from this?
Sheldrick: The What3words consumer app and website are totally free for consumers and businesses. We make money by a tool that converts three-word addresses into latitude and longitude, which you need if you’re a company like Mercedes. When you tell it the three words, it’s meaningless to the device until it becomes latitude and longitude. So it’s that enterprise code that we license.

Do you make that that available through an API [application programming interface] so apps can tap into your servers to do that translation?
Sheldrick: It’s available to an API, or people can have an SDK [software developer kit] which runs totally offline.

If you have this app installed on your phone and you have no network service, will What3words work?
Sheldrick: Absolutely. All of the three-word addresses for the world are embedded in our app. Our app will point you where to go with a compass, but if you want to have an interactive turn-by-turn navigation system, that’s when you should use Navmii. It’s got offline maps of the world embedded and offline What3words for the world embedded.

Can people buy vanity word combinations?
Sheldrick: You can’t. If you do that, [the app] can’t work offline. And you’d have voice-recognition problems if someone were to buy john.smith.home and someone else jon.smith.home, one with J-O-H-N- and one with J-O-N.

One of the biggest problems for you is that Google Maps rules the world for a lot of consumers. What kind of alliance would you like to see?
Sheldrick: We would like to integrate into all of the major mapping platforms. It’s important to separate maps from navigation from addresses. We don’t compete with maps. We don’t compete with navigation. We just provide an alternative way of typing in an address.

But Google has its own technology, plus codes [formerly Open Location Code], which shorten latitude-longitude coordinates into a string of letters and numbers that perhaps are a bit easier to retype. What’s your take on that?
Sheldrick: It’s actually not much shorter than a latitude and longitude. It’s 10 characters, and latitude and longitude is 16. And I cannot remember the plus codes. It’s exactly the same as what [navigation company] TomTom built about a decade ago — map code, which is nine characters. This is one character harder. It’s like trying to remember the password on the back of your Wi-Fi router. It’s very, very difficult, even if somebody takes you through it letter by letter. Three words feels very easy for everybody to remember and use and communicate, but long series of alphanumeric characters just aren’t.

And good luck saying “M as in Mary, N as in Nancy.”
Sheldrick: This is really problematic. We’re meeting on El Camino Real at the moment. I tried putting that road into my rental car sat-nav. There were so many in the neighboring area, this one didn’t even come up on the menu. In London, you’ve got 34 roads called Victoria Road. In Mexico City, 632 Juarez Streets. If you’re someone who builds a voice interface for navigation, where you need to get it right first time, this is a major problem.

Who are you in talks with right now for your next phase of expansion?
Sheldrick: We’re working with a lot of other car companies, a selection of the voice assistants and in some cases combining the two. The big phase of this year’s roll out is to become ubiquitous across the automotive industry.

We are dealing with more and more e-commerce and logistics companies in emerging markets. We have compelling evidence of the financial benefit for a logistics company on saving all this time to actually reach customers accurately.

What happens when you’re a tourist and a hotel gives you their address in Swahili or Japanese or French or some language you don’t speak?
Sheldrick: You can share a three-letter address in any one of our 26 languages. [A hotel] would do it based on expected usage. In travel guides, a lot of the time, people use English, because it’s the international language. In the Middle East, a lot of people have an Arabic business card on one side, and English on the other side. It’s the same in China. They would probably do the same thing with a three-letter address. They’d put the local language and English as their international language.

What countries use What3words for postal services right now?
Sheldrick: Mongolia is the country where it’s up and in use. You can apply for a credit card now with the biggest bank in the country. You put an address on, the post service understands it, and it gets to you. There’s several island countries, like the Solomon Islands and Tonga, where What3words had been adopted, but they are producing technology at the moment so that consumers can understand it. Same with Djibouti and Cote d’Ivoire [Ivory Coast].

Looking at the usage of your translation service to convert What3words locations to latitude-longitude, what’s the biggest usage by category? Logistics? Post offices? Consumers?
Sheldrick: At the moment, consumers make up by far the biggest proportion of the buyer market. It’s those who are often doing outdoor activities and going to new places. People who are traveling a lot experience this problem in a big way. People have told us they’re buying a Mercedes for the first time because it has What3words.

We just released this photo app called 3word Photo where you can geotag a photo with it. You might have been in the middle of Yosemite National Park and saying, “I took this photo and it was exactly here.” It’s just a great way of immersing yourself in the ecosystem.

What’s been the most surprising use?
Sheldrick: It’s been interesting to see how NGO [nongovernmental organizations, like disaster response groups] or emergency services operations have taken to it. It’s a really serious industry, but they hugely struggle with the communication of precise location because people use phone, SMS, all sorts of things. At the moment, a few UK police forces have started to build us in to their systems, which is amazing. The Red Cross uses it in the Philippines.

Is it a problem for governments and emergency responders to rely on you for these services? Do people have complaints or objections or worries about relying on a private company to be a necessary middleman to connect people to their packages or people to their ambulances?

Sheldrick: Governments, emergency services or any company that operate at a certain scale need a certain level of reliability. This is one of the reasons we offer a local SDK, which means they can run it on their own system. So they have total control over how that works technically. Whatever happens to our servers, they are fine. If anything were to happen to our company, they could keep the technology, which they already have running locally.

The US address system is not in the control of FedEx or UPS. It’s the US government, county governments, local. They have the canonical record of what is truth. I could see some indigestion if somebody else is in charge of what is truth about addresses and locations.
Sheldrick: One of the really good things about What3words is it’s fixed for the whole world. There is no maintenance — keeping up with new built properties or anything like that. It’s done and that’s it. If you have a copy of What3words running on your own server, that’s it. The element of what is truth and what is up to date doesn’t really exist.

You support 26 languages. Are you expanding that?
Sheldrick: Yes. We want everyone in the world to be able to use What3words in their first language.

How many languages is that?
Sheldrick: It’s a lot. Some may have practical issues if you’re talking about incredibly small word lists used in very remote parts of certain countries. So there may be some trade-offs we have to make. But our mission is to make this incredibly easy for everyone to use.

So you have an order to the words? The popular areas get short words, so the algorithm will see that a specific patch has particular characteristics, run down through its list of words, then spit out those three words?
Sheldrick: Yes, exactly. We basically have a pretty crude map of the world in terms of population centers. We make reasonably intelligent assumptions about how to distribute those words.

In the whole of the Antarctic, sure, you’re going to find [something like] dodecahedron.hydraulics.esoterics. There may be a small population center there, but they’ll have to use long words.

Let’s project forward 10 to 15 years. Where are you guys going to be?
Sheldrick: We would like to be a global standard in a few years time. In every key piece of new mobility tech, from autonomous cars to drones to regular cars, the pain point with addresses is now or yesterday. The momentum shift is happening. Given the need for this in the world, I believe we’re only a few years away from this becoming a standard, where you see a three-word address anywhere and you know what it is.

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Spice F311 Android Oreo Go Edition launched in India with 5.45-inch 18:9 display

Indian smartphone maker Spice Devices has announced a new budget device in India, dubbed as the F311. It is an Android Oreo Go Edition device and features an 18:9 display, making it the first Android Go device to feature an 18:9 display.

Indian smartphone maker Spice Devices has announced a new budget device in India, dubbed as the F311. It is an Android Oreo Go Edition device and features an 18:9 display, making it the first Android Go device to feature an 18:9 display.

Just like other Android Go devices, the Spice F311 is also pre-installed with Android Go apps such as Files Go, Maps Go and other Go apps. The device has been priced at Rs. 5,599 and will be available from retail stores across the country.

Spice F311 Specifications

The Spice F311 runs on Android Oreo Go Edition, which is a toned-down version of Android Oreo designed for low-end devices with less RAM. It features a 5.34-inch FWVGA+ display with a resolution of 960 x 480 pixels and an aspect ratio of 18:9.

In terms of performance, the Spice F311 is powered by a quad core MediaTek MT6737M SoC coupled with Mali-T720 GPU. In terms of memory, the device has been launched with 1GB RAM and 16GB of internal storage which can be further expanded up to 32GB via a microSD card.

Coming to the camera department, the Spice F311 features a 5MP primary camera with f/2.0 aperture, 1.4μm pixel size and an LED flash. On the front, the device sports a 5MP selfie camera with an LED flash. The device sports a fingerprint sensor below the primary camera and a Social share key faster social sharing.

The Spice F311 is powered by a 2,400mAh battery and connectivity options on the device will include 4G VoLTE, WiFi 802.11 b/g/n, Bluetooth 4.2, 3.5mm audio jack, GPS and a microUSB port.