FCC’s Ajit Pai plans to free up spectrum for 5G, Wi-Fi coverage – CNET

The Federal Communications Commission is trying to pave a smoother road to our 5G future.

The government agency plans to consider freeing up more radio airwaves for use in 5G networks in its next monthly meeting, FCC Chairman Ajit Pai said in a statement.

The Federal Communications Commission is trying to pave a smoother road to our 5G future.

The government agency plans to consider freeing up more radio airwaves for use in 5G networks in its next monthly meeting, FCC Chairman Ajit Pai said in a statement. The commission will look to the 3.5 gigahertz spectrum band as a potential source of radio airwaves. While not the super high-frequency spectrum commonly talked about when looking at 5G networks, 3.5 Ghz has the potential to carry more capacity and speed than lower frequency spectrum used in many of today’s networks.

The agency will also look at freeing up the use of 6 Ghz band of unlicensed spectrum for use to bolster Wi-Fi coverage. Wi-Fi runs on two existing frequecies, 2.4 Ghz and 5 Ghz, and adding a new band could alleviate congestion.

Pai said the agency would also look at removing regulations on rural carriers, which he said would let them invest in their networks.

Improving coverage across the country, whether through 5G or better Wi-Fi, has been a priority for the agency and one of the few issues that most people can agree on.

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4 ways to protect your home from Wi-Fi theft – CNET

Is your Wi-Fi slower than usual? Having trouble connecting? It’s possible that someone is mooching your Wi-Fi on the sly.

Whether it’s the guy in the upstairs apartment or bad code running on a shady device, the misuse must stop.

Is your Wi-Fi slower than usual? Having trouble connecting? It’s possible that someone is mooching your Wi-Fi on the sly.

Whether it’s the guy in the upstairs apartment or bad code running on a shady device, the misuse must stop. This guide will help you do just that.

See what’s connected to your network

Many of today’s network routers feature companion mobile apps. These applications let you both monitor and control your network right from your phone. Check your router’s user manual to see if there’s an app for it. Products from many big players offer home network hardware that come with this ability, including Google, Netgear and Asus.

Within the app, look for a menu called “connected devices” or something similar . You should see a list of devices currently connected to your home Wi-Fi. Look through the list and take stock of what’s in your home that connects to the internet.

If you see an active device that’s clearly not one you own, like a Windows PC when your family has only Macs, or perhaps an unknown iPad ($329 at Walmart), that’s a tell-tale sign that someone else is using your Wi-Fi.

If your router is a few years old, it may not offer an app. Even so, you should be able to access a list of connected devices though your router’s web portal. Check your manual for access instructions.


8
7 reasons your garden needs Wi-Fi

Look for unknown devices

Within the list of devices connected to your network, sometimes there are items with mysterious labels like, “Unknown Device.”

To identify these mysterious devices, start by looking for their MAC and IP addresses in your router’s app or web portal. Then find that info on your connected devices. Some Wi-Fi products actually have their MAC address printed on them physically, but you can also find them in the device’s settings.

Once you think you’ve tracked down the gadget in question, unplug or disconnect it if you can. If it disappears from your list of connected devices, then that’s your answer.

If the mystery item is currently idle — i.e. not actively consuming metered data — and remains that way every time you check it, try disabling it. The app for the Google Wi-Fi router displays this information. Some other routers from Buffalo and Asus also provide these details. If not, you might want to consider third-party network monitoring software.

Pay close attention to any unknown items that remain, even after you’ve powered down every conceivable device. Be especially wary of unknown items like this that are actively using network data. These could be unauthorized users or software. Disable them promptly just to be safe.


13
12 gorgeous household devices we can’t stop staring at

Ensure your Wi-Fi network is secure

If you aren’t already using a password to access your home’s Wi-Fi, stop now and set up password protection. By leaving your network open, anyone can use it and even steal your passwords.

Already using a password? If you find suspicious devices on your network, it’s time to change it — especially if you haven’t done so since you got your router.

It’s always prudent to use the toughest security protocols available. For Wi-Fi, that also happens to be the most recently implemented, WPA2. Select that option if you can within your router settings.

Stay up to date

Stagnant network software is a hack waiting to happen. Check for firmware and software updates regularly, and apply them when available.

This doesn’t just mean your router, but anything connected to home Wi-Fi. Laptops, phones, tablets, light switches, speakers, refrigerators, all are fair game.

More about Wi-Fi, routers, and securitySecurity researcher fined for hacking hotel Wi-FiThese are the best wireless routers for 2018

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The best cheap soundbar deals and sales in October 2018

There are some pieces of tech that never get a huge reduction in price. But in the same way we recommend you shouldn’t doubt the huge amounts of power and high quality audio a soundbar can pump out, we also recommend you don’t doubt the huge amounts of power of a good soundbar deal.

There are some pieces of tech that never get a huge reduction in price. But in the same way we recommend you shouldn’t doubt the huge amounts of power and high quality audio a soundbar can pump out, we also recommend you don’t doubt the huge amounts of power of a good soundbar deal.

Finding a decent saving on a unibody speaker isn’t hard. What’s more, even some of the cheapest soundbars on the market can still add a decent level of clarity and audio oomph to your living room on a level that your regular TV can’t.

Once you’ve got your hands on a new soundbar, the results speak for themselves. But trying to dig around and find the best soundbar deal right now can be a long slog. That’s because the world of soundbars, and audio products more generally, are filled with a random series of numbers, Vizio SB-3830-D0 38-inch soundbar, anyone?

There are also a lot of drastic differences in price that can be overwhelming even to the most seasoned of audiophiles. But don’t worry, that’s where we come in.

On a bigger budget? Check out our guide to the best soundbars overallWhat’s the best soundbar deal?

As you’d expect, the answer to that question is going to be different for everyone.

Some people are fine with a standard soundbar, that means no subwoofer and no streaming capabilities. Others might want the sub, but no streaming. Others might want all of the above, plus two satellite speakers. It’s a your-miles-may-vary situation.

That said, we can give you some good ideas of what to look for and where to find those great deals when they pop up.

For most folks, you really just want the basic package: a soundbar with a digital audio cable input that should connect to most modern TVs. You can get a bit tricky with HDMI passthroughs, RCA inputs and 3.5mm jacks, but sometimes basic is better. Of course, we also recommend looking for soundbars with a subwoofer included, that way you’ll get the full audio range from your favorite TV shows and movies, not just the highs and the mids.

There’s plenty of soundbars to pick from, and more coming out every week, so without further ado here are the best soundbar deals we’ve found this month.

Samsung’s HW-J355 is one of the best-selling soundbars, and for good reason. Not only does it offer good sound quality from its four combined-120W tweeters, but also comes with a wired subwoofer to add some meat to the sound. It’s a bit on the trim side at 37.13 x 2.28 x 2.56 inches, but it only weighs 3.5 lbs. The accompanying subwoofer is wired, so that might be one hang-up, and you won’t find a ton of ports here. On the plus side, though, it comes with 3D Sound Plus, which tries to simulate a surround sound effect using some clever sonic tricks. If you don’t mind something basic, this is your guy.

Read the review:Samsung HW-J355

Don’t want to be tied to a subwoofer? We don’t blame you. If you want the same robust quality of sound without the extra black box, check out the Bose Solo 5 TV Sound System. The bar measures in at a fair 2.6 x 21.6 x 3.4 inches (H x W x D) and 3.73 lbs, making it easy to wall-mount. As far as inputs and outputs are concerned it takes optical audio, coaxial audio and 3.5mm auxiliary. It comes with a remote control, which we appreciate, and has built-in Bluetooth.

The M3 soundbar is easy to love. It might not be the most glamorous to look at, stubbornly only supports 2.1 channels of sound, and has never heard of Wi-Fi, but if there’s a better sounding soundbar on the market for less than £300/$300, we haven’t heard it. Unfortunately, there’s no subwoofer here or shot at simulated surround sound, but that’s because Q Acoustics has very deliberately kept things simple by not attempting to ‘muddy the waters’ by trying to apply (often ugly) psycho-acoustic processing.

Read the review:Q Acoustics M3 Soundbar

If you’re looking for a soundbar that strikes the balance between feature set, performance and price, LG’s SH7B is it. That said, it might cost a bit more than you were looking to spend. Thankfully, it’s very often on sale. This soundbar measures in at 41.73 x 2.09 x 3.35 inches, making it perfect for 49-inch and up TVs. The soundbar excels in the movie department – lasers, explosions and crushing bodily impacts in football hit home with impactful blasts of sound –that said, it’s probably not the best soundbar for the music lover out there.

Read the review:LG SH7B

Not content with dominating the TV world, Samsung now seems to have its sights set on becoming the number one brand for home entertainment audio, too. To that end, the Samsung HW-MS650 Sound+ Soundbar is one of our favorite pieces of AV equipment made this year – which is why we gave it our coveted Editor’s Choice award when it came out last year.

Samsung has rewritten the rulebook with the HW-MS650. No other one-body soundbar has combined so much raw power with so much clarity, scale and, especially, bass, or excelled so consistently with both films and music. It’s the sort of performance that only genuine audio innovation can deliver.

If you can afford it, this is the soundbar you need in your living room.

Read the review: Samsung HW-MS650 Sound+ Soundbar

One of the best deals on high-end soundbars comes in the form of Sony’s HT-NT5. This 6.1 soundbar offers 400 watts of power and, for the audiophiles out there, supports 24-bit/96KHz Hi-Res Audio. The main bar is 42.51 x 2.28 x 5.00 inches (W x H x D) while the accompanying wireless subwoofer sits at a portly 7.48 × 15.0 × 15.2 inches. As far as inputs and outputs are concerned, it has Analog Audio In, Bluetooth Reception, Bluetooth Transmission, Ethernet, USB, three HDMI-Ins and one HDMI-Out. Beyond traditional Wi-Fi and Bluetooth the HT-NT5 also supports multi-room listening through Sony’s SongPal app, and works with Google Home.

Read the review: Sony HT-NT5

Just when you think you really know a company, it goes and releases something completely out of left-field. Take Razer: historically, it’s been a peddler of pointers and the king of keyboards. Then they release the Razer Leviathan, a really smart soundbar that costs less than most TVs. Razer’s audio monster might not have the most power-per-inch at only 30 watts, but we really liked how low it could go with the accompanying subwoofer. Plus, while other speakers on this list might not even attempt surround sound, Razer gives it the ol’ college try and actually does a decent job with it. It might not be as good as a true 7.1 system, but try finding one of those for under $199/£159.

Read the review:Razer Leviathan

With four HDMI inputs and 4K passthrough, myriad other connections and Bluetooth streaming, it’s tempting to call the Arcam Solo Bar as much of a home cinema hub as a soundbar. It also adds Bluetooth aptX for good measure, rendering your streamed tunes listenable at last. Well connected it may be, but this 1,000 x 130 x 110mm unit offers more than one-cable nirvana, with its two speakers offering a lot more meat than the average flat TV. Want more welly? Just add Arcam’s wireless Solo Sub. Want it for a steal? We’ve got you covered.

These are the best soundbars of 2017

Global Wired Interface Market 2018-2023 – Increasing Adoption Because of Low Data Streaming/Transferring Capacity of Bluetooth and Wi-Fi Technology

DUBLIN, Oct. 1, 2018 /PRNewswire/ —

The “Wired Interface Market by Component Type (USB (USB TYPE C, and Other USB TYPE), HDMI, Thunderbolt, and DisplayPort), Device, and Geography (North America, Europe, Asia Pacific, and Rest of the World) – Global Forecast to 2023” report has been added to ResearchAndMarkets.com’s offering.

The wired interface market is expected to reach 8.78 billion units by 2023 from 6.51 billion units in 2018, at a CAGR of 6.2% between 2018 and 2023.

The market was valued at USD 17.87 billion in 2018, and is expected to reach USD 34.72 billion by 2023, at a CAGR of 14.2% between 2018 and 2023.

Major factors driving the growth of the wired interface market include increasing use of consumer devices such as smartphone and increasing demand for wired interface due to its advantage of high data and power transfer capacity over wireless technology.

PCs and laptops are expected to hold the largest share of the wired interface market throughout the forecast period. Most PCs and laptops are equipped with USB, HDMI, DisplayPort, and Thunderport technologies. Demand for PC and laptop is expected to decrease during the forecast period because of the increase in the use of smartphones and tablets. Furthermore, because of the high price of laptops, in developing economies, consumers are delaying buying new PCs/laptops, thus extending the lifecycle of existing PCs/laptops.

The USB Type C wired interface is expected to grow at the highest CAGR during the forecast period. USB Type C wired interface is a two-way rotational 24-pin connector, which is smaller in size and can be embedded with all possible devices. Thus, they are currently being adopted in compact devices such as smartphone, tablets and wearables.

The wired interface market in North America is expected to register the highest CAGR during the forecast period. North America is a hub for technological innovations and an early adopter of new technologies. Factors such as presence of major companies, increasing consumer spending, and growing popularity of advanced devices are driving the wired interface market in North America. Asia Pacific accounted for the largest share of the overall wired interface market in 2017, with China being one of the major contributors in terms of market size.

The wired interface market is greatly influenced by the smartphone market. According to the Cisco VNI forecast, smartphones accounted for 3.6 billion units of all network devices in 2016 and are expected to reach 6.2 billion units by 2021. This is due to the growing adoption of smartphones in Asia Pacific (APAC) and Rest of the World (RoW). The growing adoption of smartphones is expected to propel the demand for USB Type C wired interface technology during the forecast period (2018-2023).
Tablet

Demand for tablets is expected to increase because of its compact size and processor upgrade. According to the Cisco VNI forecast, tablets accounted for 580.3 million units of all networks devices in 2016 and are expected to grow at a CAGR of 5.3% during the forecast period. The USB wired interface technology is used in tablets for data and power connectivity purposes.
PC & Laptop

Demand for PCs and laptops is expected to decrease during the forecast period because of the increase in the use of smartphones and tablets. Furthermore, because of the high price of laptops, in developing economies, consumers are delaying buying new PCs/laptops, thus extending the lifecycle of existing PCs/laptops, which would indirectly affect the overall market revenue. Most PCs and laptops are equipped with USB, HDMI, DisplayPort, and Thunderport technologies.

The shipment of PCs and tablets has witnessed a decline over the past few years. Moreover, the decline in shipment is expected to continue at least for the next couple of years and is attributed to the mature installed base and high replacement cycle of these two products. Despite the growth of overall consumer electronics segment in Asia Pacific, the shipment of PCs and tablets is expected to witness a negligible growth, affected largely by the improved performance of phablets and falling prices of smartphones. Thus, falling shipment of PCs and laptops may adversely impact the growth of the wired interface market.

Key Topics Covered:

1 Introduction

2 Research Methodology

3 Executive Summary

4 Premium Insights
4.1 Attractive Opportunities for the Wired Interface Market
4.2 Wired Interface Market, By Device
4.3 Wired Interface Market, By Component Type
4.4 Wired Interface Market, By Geography

5 Market Overview
5.1 Introduction
5.2 Market Dynamics
5.2.1 Drivers
5.2.1.1 Increasing Use of Smartphones
5.2.1.2 Increasing Adoption of Wired Interface Connectivity Because of Low Data Streaming/Transferring Capacity of Bluetooth and Wi-Fi Technology
5.2.1.3 Proliferation of Automotive Infotainment
5.2.2 Restraints
5.2.2.1 Declining Shipment of PCS and Tablets
5.2.2.2 Overall Drop in Global Commodity Prices
5.2.3 Opportunities
5.2.3.1 Increasing Demand for Drone Market
5.2.3.2 Increasing Application of Wired Interface in New Devices
5.2.4 Challenges
5.2.4.1 Certification of Products
5.3 Value Chain Analysis
5.3.1 Research & Development
5.3.2 Manufacturing and Assembly
5.3.3 Distribution, Sales and Marketing

6 Wired Interface Market, By Component
6.1 Introduction
6.2 USB Wired Interface
6.2.1 USB Type C Wired Interface
6.2.2 Other USB Type Wired Interface
6.3 Hdmi Wired Interface
6.4 Displayport Wired Interface
6.5 Thunderbolt Wired Interface

7 Wired Interface Market, By Device
7.1 Introduction
7.2 Smartphone
7.3 Tablet
7.4 PC and Laptop
7.5 Television
7.6 Virtual Reality
7.7 Drones
7.8 Gaming Console
7.9 External Hard Disk
7.10 Camera
7.11 Projector
7.12 Wearable
7.13 Home Theatre and Multimedia Device
7.14 Power Bank
7.15 Automotive
7.16 Display Monitor
7.17 USB Flash Drive
7.18 Set-Top Box

8 Geographic Analysis

9 Competitive Landscape
9.1 Overview
9.2 Market Ranking Analysis
9.3 Competitive Scenario
9.3.1 Product Launches and Developments
9.3.2 10 Most Recent Partnerships, Contracts, Acquisitions, and Agreements

10 Company Profiles
10.1 Key Players
10.1.1 Molex Inc.
10.1.2 Amphenol Corporation
10.1.3 Japan Aviation Electronics Industry, Ltd.
10.1.4 TE Connectivity Ltd.
10.1.5 Stmicroelectronics N.V.
10.1.6 NXP Semiconductors N.V.
10.1.7 Microchip Technology Inc
10.1.8 Texas Instruments Inc
10.1.9 Cypress Semiconductor Corp.
10.1.10 Rohm Co., Ltd.
10.1.11 Hirose Electric Co., Ltd.
10.1.12 on Semiconductor Corporation
10.1.13 Analog Devices Inc.
10.1.14 Diodes Inc.
10.1.15 Murata Manufacturing Co. Ltd.
10.1.16 Vishay Intertechnology, Inc.
10.1.17 Silicon Laboratories Inc.
10.1.18 Maxim Integrated Products, Inc.
10.1.19 CUI, Inc.
10.1.20 Yamaichi Electronics Co. Ltd.

For more information about this report visit https://www.researchandmarkets.com/research/mnrckl/global_wired?w=5

Media Contact:

Research and Markets
Laura Wood, Senior Manager
press@researchandmarkets.com

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SOURCE Research and Markets

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802.11ax preview: Access points and routers that support the Wi-Fi 6 protocol on tap

The latest update to the Wi-Fi protocol standard, 802.11ax, has been designed to transmit data even faster, to better negotiate bandwidth among several computers and other devices connected to a network, and to more reliably deliver high-bandwidth applications to them, such as streaming video, than the protocol standard it succeeds, 802.11ac.

The latest update to the Wi-Fi protocol standard, 802.11ax, has been designed to transmit data even faster, to better negotiate bandwidth among several computers and other devices connected to a network, and to more reliably deliver high-bandwidth applications to them, such as streaming video, than the protocol standard it succeeds, 802.11ac.

To take advantage of these gains, client and networking devices need to have hardware that supports the new protocol, of course. Many network device makers have announced 802.11ax products to come. They’ve also filed 802.11ax devices with the FCC for licensing, which reveal more technical information about them.

LEARN MORE: Check out our hands-on reviews of 5 top hardware-based Wi-Fi test toolsand Mojo’s wireless intrusion prevention system.Plus learn what 802.11ax Wi-Fi is, and what will it mean for 802.11ac

Some of the 802.11ax access points and routers that we know of have “AX6000” or “AX11000” as part of their names or listed in their specs. These numbers represent the total sum of data that all the bands of the device can transmit at maximum. Under 802.11ax, on the 2.4 GHz band, this maximum is 1148 Mbps. On the 5 GHz band, the rate can go up to 4804 Mbps. An access point or router designated “AX6000” has a 2.4 GHz and 5 GHz band. “AX11000” means it has three bands: one 2.4 GHz and two 5 GHz.

Expect to hear about Wi-Fi 6

As these new routers come to market, you might see some of them referred to as Wi-Fi 6 devices, a new term coined by the Wi-Fi Alliance. The naming scheme is meant to make it simpler for consumers to recognize which of the IEEE 802.11 standards individual Wi-Fi devices support. Wi-Fi 6 is the designation for 802.11ax support.

One vendor – Aerohive Networks – is already selling 802.11ax products for the enterprise; other leading device makers are readying their own 802.11ax networking devices, some of which could be released soon while others will make their debut in 2019. Here’s what we know so far.

Aerohive first to market with enterprise 802.11ax access point

In January, Aerohive Networks announced three 802.11ax access points and said they would be available in the third-quarter of this year. This maker of networking equipment for the enterprise shipped its first 802.11ax access point, the AP630, on July 31.

Aerohive Networks

The AP630 is a dual-band Wi-Fi router running on a 1.8GHz dual-core Broadcom CPU with 1GB RAM and 256MB flash memory. Its connector ports include two LAN Ethernet and one USB 2.0. It’s now available to buy for $1,199.

[ Take this mobile device management course from PluralSight and learn how to secure devices in your company without degrading the user experience. ]

The AP650 is Aerohive’s tri-band model. Its CPU is a 1.8GHz quad-core Broadcom but has the same memory amounts as the AP630. It has one 2.5-Gigabit WAN and one LAN connectors, and one USB 3.0 port. The AP650X is the AP650 with eight external antennas to provide a wider broadcasting range. Both version models sell for $1399.

ASUS makes a statement with Rapture GT-AX11000

ASUS announced on June 4 three 802.11ax products to be released in the third quarter of this year.

With its eight antennas surrounding an angular case design, the appearance of the Rapture GT-AX11000 conveys a sense of power. ASUS claimed its Rapture GT-AX11000 is the first tri-band 802.11ax router in the world (despite the fact that another company announced their own tri-band in January; ASUS perhaps means that it aims to bring its to market first).

ASUS

The Rapture GT-AX11000 runs on a 1.8Ghz quad-core Broadcom chipset with 1GB RAM and 256MB flash memory. Its WAN Ethernet port is 2.5 Gbps. Other ports include four LAN Ethernet and two USB 3.1.

ASUS revealed another 802.11ax router, a dual-band model: the RT-AX88U running on the same Broadcom CPU and memory amounts. Its WAN port is 1-Gigabit, but it has eight LAN ports. Like the Rapture GT-AX11000, it has two USB 3.1 ports.

The third 802.11ax product is a mesh networking setup. The AiMesh AX6100 WiFi System will be sold as a pair of devices. Each broadcasts three bands that individually support different Wi-Fi protocol standards: one band is 5 GHz, supports 802.11ax, and can relay data up to 4804 Mbps. A second 5 GHz band supports 802.11ac for a maximum rate of 866 Mbps. The third is 2.4 GHz, set for 802.11n and able to transmit up to 400 Mbps.

Charter previews 802.11ax router for its customers

On August 1, Charter Communications announced it will release a Wi-Fi router supporting 802.11ax for its Spectrum broadband service. According to the official announcement, Charter will be the first broadband provider in the U.S. to support this new standard with its own router for Charter customers.

There weren’t any details about the hardware given in the company’s press release, but an FCC filing lists a dual-band router by Charter under the name “RAX1V1K.” It has a 2.0GHz quad-core Qualcomm CPU. Its connectors include one 2.5-Gigabit WAN and four LAN Ethernet, and one USB 3.0 port.

D-Link’s 802.11ax products include AX11000 Ultra Wi-Fi Router

D-Link announced its 802.11ax products on January 8. An early marketing video for D-Link’s tri-band 802.11ax router, the AX11000 Ultra Wi-Fi Router, touts that it’s for “extreme networks.” Like ASUS’s tri-band router, this D-Link model has eight antennas and a sharp, angular design. It’s a mystery for now what kind of CPU and amount of RAM it will have. But it has one 5-Gigabit WAN and four LAN Ethernet, and one USB 3.0 port.

D-Link

A dual-band model, the AX6000 Ultra Wi-Fi Router, has the same number and type of ports as the tri-band model. More details in an FCC filing for it say that this router runs a 1.8GHz quad-core Broadcom CPU with 512MB of RAM and 256MB of flash memory.

D-Link said that these routers would be available sometime in the second half of this year.

Linksys mum on 802.11ax access point plans

This well-known maker of networking devices has been laying low about what its 802.11ax plans may be. It looks like Linksys may be waiting things out and willing to come late into the market. There doesn’t appear to be any FCC listings for 802.11ax devices that have been submitted by the company.

Netgear keeps 802.11ax plans under wraps

Although Netgear, another major maker of networking devices, hasn’t said much about its 802.11ax plans either, there are two FCC listings by them for 802.11ax routers.

One goes by the codename Jaguar and is speculated to be called the Nighthawk X12 or Nighthawk AX8 when it’s released. It appears to be a dual-band router. It has a 1.8GHz quad-core Broadcom CPU, 512MB RAM and 256MB flash memory. Its connectors include one WAN Ethernet and five LAN, and two USB 3.0 ports.

The second 802.11ax router is codenamed Leopard. The differences with the Jaguar is it is listed as having a 2.0GHz quad-core CPU by Qualcomm and four LAN Ethernet ports.

TP-Link goes futuristic with Archer AX11000

Here’s another tri-band 802.11ax router with a case design that wouldn’t be out of place as a prop from science fiction. The eight antennas of the Archer AX11000 look like futuristic weapon blades sheathed around an industrial knife block.

According to a press release that TP-Link put out on August 31, the Archer AX11000 has a 1.8GHz quad-core Broadcom CPU with 1GB RAM and 512MB flash memory. It has one 2.5Gbps WAN and eight LAN Ethernet ports, and one USB 3.0 Type A and one USB 3.0 Type C port.

Another router, the Archer AX6000, was also mentioned in this press release. Other than being a dual-band model, it appears to have most of the same specs as its tri-band counterpart (minus the flash memory).

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802.11ax preview: Access points and routers that support new Wi-Fi protocol on tap

The latest update to the Wi-Fi protocol standard, 802.11ax, has been designed to transmit data even faster, to better negotiate bandwidth among several computers and other devices connected to a network, and to more reliably deliver high-bandwidth applications to them, such as streaming video, than the protocol standard it succeeds, 802.11ac.

The latest update to the Wi-Fi protocol standard, 802.11ax, has been designed to transmit data even faster, to better negotiate bandwidth among several computers and other devices connected to a network, and to more reliably deliver high-bandwidth applications to them, such as streaming video, than the protocol standard it succeeds, 802.11ac.

To take advantage of these gains, client and networking devices need to have hardware that supports the new protocol, of course. Many network device makers have announced 802.11ax products to come. They’ve also filed 802.11ax devices with the FCC for licensing, which reveal more technical information about them.

LEARN MORE: Check out our hands-on reviews of 5 top hardware-based Wi-Fi test toolsand Mojo’s wireless intrusion prevention system.Plus learn what 802.11ax Wi-Fi is, and what will it mean for 802.11ac

Some of the 802.11ax access points and routers that we know of have “AX6000” or “AX11000” as part of their names or listed in their specs. These numbers represent the total sum of data that all the bands of the device can transmit at maximum. Under 802.11ax, on the 2.4 GHz band, this maximum is 1148 Mbps. On the 5 GHz band, the rate can go up to 4804 Mbps. An access point or router designated “AX6000” has a 2.4 GHz and 5 GHz band. “AX11000” means it has three bands: one 2.4 GHz and two 5 GHz.

One vendor – Aerohive Networks – is already selling 802.11ax products for the enterprise; other leading device makers are readying their own 802.11ax networking devices, some of which could be released soon while others will make their debut in 2019. Here’s what we know so far.

Aerohive first to market with enterprise 802.11ax access point

In January, Aerohive Networks announced three 802.11ax access points and said they would be available in the third-quarter of this year. This maker of networking equipment for the enterprise shipped its first 802.11ax access point, the AP630, on July 31.

Aerohive Networks

The AP630 is a dual-band Wi-Fi router running on a 1.8GHz dual-core Broadcom CPU with 1GB RAM and 256MB flash memory. Its connector ports include two LAN Ethernet and one USB 2.0. It’s now available to buy for $1,199.

The AP650 is Aerohive’s tri-band model. Its CPU is a 1.8GHz quad-core Broadcom but has the same memory amounts as the AP630. It has one 2.5-Gigabit WAN and one LAN connectors, and one USB 3.0 port. The AP650X is the AP650 with eight external antennas to provide a wider broadcasting range. Both version models sell for $1399.

[ Take this mobile device management course from PluralSight and learn how to secure devices in your company without degrading the user experience. ] ASUS makes a statement with Rapture GT-AX11000

ASUS announced on June 4 three 802.11ax products to be released in the third quarter of this year.

With its eight antennas surrounding an angular case design, the appearance of the Rapture GT-AX11000 conveys a sense of power. ASUS claimed its Rapture GT-AX11000 is the first tri-band 802.11ax router in the world (despite the fact that another company announced their own tri-band in January; ASUS perhaps means that it aims to bring its to market first).

ASUS

The Rapture GT-AX11000 runs on a 1.8Ghz quad-core Broadcom chipset with 1GB RAM and 256MB flash memory. Its WAN Ethernet port is 2.5 Gbps. Other ports include four LAN Ethernet and two USB 3.1.

ASUS revealed another 802.11ax router, a dual-band model: the RT-AX88U running on the same Broadcom CPU and memory amounts. Its WAN port is 1-Gigabit, but it has eight LAN ports. Like the Rapture GT-AX11000, it has two USB 3.1 ports.

The third 802.11ax product is a mesh networking setup. The AiMesh AX6100 WiFi System will be sold as a pair of devices. Each broadcasts three bands that individually support different Wi-Fi protocol standards: one band is 5 GHz, supports 802.11ax, and can relay data up to 4804 Mbps. A second 5 GHz band supports 802.11ac for a maximum rate of 866 Mbps. The third is 2.4 GHz, set for 802.11n and able to transmit up to 400 Mbps.

Charter previews 802.11ax router for its customers

On August 1, Charter Communications announced it will release a Wi-Fi router supporting 802.11ax for its Spectrum broadband service. According to the official announcement, Charter will be the first broadband provider in the U.S. to support this new standard with its own router for Charter customers.

There weren’t any details about the hardware given in the company’s press release, but an FCC filing lists a dual-band router by Charter under the name “RAX1V1K.” It has a 2.0GHz quad-core Qualcomm CPU. Its connectors include one 2.5-Gigabit WAN and four LAN Ethernet, and one USB 3.0 port.

D-Link’s 802.11ax products include AX11000 Ultra Wi-Fi Router

D-Link announced its 802.11ax products on January 8. An early marketing video for D-Link’s tri-band 802.11ax router, the AX11000 Ultra Wi-Fi Router, touts that it’s for “extreme networks.” Like ASUS’s tri-band router, this D-Link model has eight antennas and a sharp, angular design. It’s a mystery for now what kind of CPU and amount of RAM it will have. But it has one 5-Gigabit WAN and four LAN Ethernet, and one USB 3.0 port.

D-Link

A dual-band model, the AX6000 Ultra Wi-Fi Router, has the same number and type of ports as the tri-band model. More details in an FCC filing for it say that this router runs a 1.8GHz quad-core Broadcom CPU with 512MB of RAM and 256MB of flash memory.

D-Link said that these routers would be available sometime in the second half of this year.

Linksys mum on 802.11ax access point plans

This well-known maker of networking devices has been laying low about what its 802.11ax plans may be. It looks like Linksys may be waiting things out and willing to come late into the market. There doesn’t appear to be any FCC listings for 802.11ax devices that have been submitted by the company.

Netgear keeps 802.11ax plans under wraps

Although Netgear, another major maker of networking devices, hasn’t said much about its 802.11ax plans either, there are two FCC listings by them for 802.11ax routers.

One goes by the codename Jaguar and is speculated to be called the Nighthawk X12 or Nighthawk AX8 when it’s released. It appears to be a dual-band router. It has a 1.8GHz quad-core Broadcom CPU, 512MB RAM and 256MB flash memory. Its connectors include one WAN Ethernet and five LAN, and two USB 3.0 ports.

The second 802.11ax router is codenamed Leopard. The differences with the Jaguar is it is listed as having a 2.0GHz quad-core CPU by Qualcomm and four LAN Ethernet ports.

TP-Link goes futuristic with Archer AX11000

Here’s another tri-band 802.11ax router with a case design that wouldn’t be out of place as a prop from science fiction. The eight antennas of the Archer AX11000 look like futuristic weapon blades sheathed around an industrial knife block.

According to a press release that TP-Link put out on August 31, the Archer AX11000 has a 1.8GHz quad-core Broadcom CPU with 1GB RAM and 512MB flash memory. It has one 2.5Gbps WAN and eight LAN Ethernet ports, and one USB 3.0 Type A and one USB 3.0 Type C port.

Another router, the Archer AX6000, was also mentioned in this press release. Other than being a dual-band model, it appears to have most of the same specs as its tri-band counterpart (minus the flash memory).

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Caavo Control Center challenges Harmony for command of your TV – CNET

If you have an entertainment system with a nice TV and more than a couple things connected to it — like a DVR, game console, streamer and AV receiver — you probably own a universal remote.

If you have an entertainment system with a nice TV and more than a couple things connected to it — like a DVR, game console, streamer and AV receiver — you probably own a universal remote. And chances are, that remote is a Logitech Harmony.

Harmony has held hegemony in the living room for more than a decade. Its clickers are my go-to recommendation to eliminate that dreaded coffee table-full of remotes. The Harmony Companion is my current Editors’ Choice, and I still consider it “the best universal remote experience for the money, making your home entertainment center easier to use than ever.”

I wrote those words more than four years ago and they still apply today. No remote released since can challenge Harmony’s utility and ease of use. But that could change soon, thanks to Caavo.


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Caavo Control Center is a smarter remote with voice, HDMI switching

The Caavo Control Center, available today for $99, has “Harmony killer” written all over it. It’s actually the second system from Silicon Valley startup Caavo. The first, which came out in February and cost $400, was promising but fatally flawed because it wasn’t compatible with high dynamic range (HDR) video, which provides the best image quality to midrange and high-end TVs. It also didn’t work with Dolby Atmos audio.

The new Control Center is not only affordable, it’s HDR- and Atmos- compatible. The catch? You’ll need to pay a $2 monthly service charge to use the Control Center. You can get a slight discount if you prepay for a year, which costs $20, but there’s no “lifetime” option a la TiVo.

Here’s the hardware basics:

Control Center is a two-part system: You get the remote itself and a little box with 4 HDMI inputs and one output.
You can connect up to four sources to the system. For example a cable box, game console, 4K Blu-ray player and streaming device.
It outputs to your TV or (if you have one) through your AV receiver to your TV. It can also work with sound bars.The inputs are HDMI 2.0 compliant, so they work with 4K, HDR10 and Dolby Vision video (the last via a forthcoming firmware update), and surround sound audio up to Dolby Atmos.
It controls just about any device using the same commands as their included remotes, whether infrared, Wi-Fi, IP or Bluetooth.The remote doesn’t need line of sight, so you can stash the whole system inside a cabinet or closet, for example. Two additional IR emitters are included for hard-to-reach gear.
A remote finder, accessible via a button on the box or voice command, causes the remote to emit a sound so you can find it among the couch cushions.
A new TV home page

That input box, which Harmony doesn’t offer, is what separates the system from Harmony. It allows Caavo to overlay your TV screen with its own menu system, opening up a bunch of new capabilities and features.

In my original review, the Caavo home page made it dead simple to select devices to control. You can also go directly to apps like Netflix, Amazon, Hulu and more without having to remember which device they’re on. Caavo actually has its own built-in search, which looks for TV shows and movies across devices, complete with the ability to talk into the remote.

You heard that right: Unlike any Harmony clicker, Caavo supports voice commands. Saying “Watch Ozark,” for example, turns on the system, switches inputs appropriately, launches Netflix on your preferred device and begins playing the show. It also works with Alexa and Google Home speakers (an ability Harmony also offers) for far-field, hands-free control. Take that, Amazon Fire TV Cube.

The final trick up Caavo’s sleeve is Watchlists. From my original review:

Perhaps the most unique and powerful aspect of the Caavo interface is Watchlists. It gathers all of the recently watched shows and movies across many of the the apps you’ve signed into, and also lists the contents of compatible DVRs. You can quickly resume and watch recent shows, and even access different profiles (e.g. “kids” on Netflix). Selecting one launches the app on your preferred device and immediately begins playing the show.

Since my review Caavo has been refining Watchlists by adding “Crowd Surfing.” In a call with CNET, company co-founders Andrew Einaudi and Ashish Aggarwal likened them to Spotify playlists. You can create and modify lists, share them publicly or privately with friends or family members, and browse Caavo’s own curated lists, including ones created by “influencers” enlisted by the company.

Now playing:Watch this: Is Caavo the ultimate high-end universal remote?
1:39

Physically the Control Center looks much less high-end than the original (featured in the video above). It lacks the beautiful woodgrain finish, the innovative HDMI-corralling posts and the volume buttons on the main unit, and is less than half as large.

Another downgrade the number of HDMI inputs, which dropped from eight to four — a potential sticking point for dudes with huge systems. I asked whether Caavo supported external HDMI switches to expand that number. Aggarwal said you could definitely add one but you’d have to handle the switching manually. He said the company was considering its own expander device that would cleanly integrate more inputs into the Control Center, but wasn’t more specific on timing or price.

Aggarwal claimed the Control Center is actually faster and more responsive than the original, thanks to new silicon and software tweaks. Its remote uses AA batteries (the original was rechargeable) that last four to six months.

Overall Caavo costs more than the Harmony Companion, especially when you consider the monthly fee, but it has the potential to ease two different hassles: Controlling your system and finding something to watch. I’ll be back with a full CNET review soon.

5 features your Android phone needs right now – CNET

I’ve been watching Android for 10 years, from the moment it first blinked to life on the T-Mobile G1 phone. It grew up with support for on-screen controls and reached its teenage years with the Google Assistant.

I’ve been watching Android for 10 years, from the moment it first blinked to life on the T-Mobile G1 phone. It grew up with support for on-screen controls and reached its teenage years with the Google Assistant. That’s an impressive feat for a mobile platform that already started far behind BlackBerry, Windows Mobile and Apple’s then year-old iOS.

Android survived where many rivals perished, thanks to its high levels of customization and Google’s search, maps and Gmail apps right in your pocket. We even predicted back in 2008 that Android could “overtake Apple’s darling” iPhone, and we were right. Android currently runs on roughly 85 percent of the world’s phones.

But no operating system is perfect, and a decade later, we can still point to five major problems that have nagged us as Android’s grown and matured. Here’s what Google could work on next.

Now playing:Watch this: Android turns 10: Google’s first Android phone was ugly,…
3:46
1. Fix the fragmentation issue

Stop me if this sounds familiar. Google announces the next version of the Android OS. Six months later, you’re still waiting for your phone to get it.

Fragmentation, when phone owners use older versions of the operating system, is Android’s enemy because it means not all users can access the latest new features. Fragmentation introduces inconsistency in the Android experience, and delays some phones from receiving timely security patches.

There are three main reasons why fragmentation occurs.

First, letting phonemakers customize the software interface that sits on top of Android is a key strength, but it also means that vendors and carriers have to meticulously test each new version of Android to make sure it works smoothly and doesn’t break. That takes money, and most of all it takes time. Google’s Pixel devices, like the Nexus phones before it, are first in line for OS upgrades.


15
All the different Android versions through the years

Second, high-end phones generally get upgrades first. Your midrange device might be so far down on your manufacturer’s pecking order that you may not see an upgrade until months after your friends with pricier phones — if at all.

Finally, some entry-level phones of the past had hardware was often too underpowered to support some software tricks. Google created Android Go, a lightweight version of its OS, to combat that problem, but it isn’t clear this has shored up the fragmentation issue on the low end.

Now playing:Watch this: The Top 5 best Android features ever
3:32

Google has certainly made strides to fight fragmentation. Last year, the company changed Android’s underlying architecture with version 8.0 Oreo. Called Project Treble, Google now aims to clear away the roadblocks between getting a new update to consumers.

Android turns 10Google’s first Android phone rivaled the iPhone like BlackBerry, Nokia never couldAndroid’s first phone, the T-Mobile G1, almost looked like a BlackBerryThe first Android phone was ugly, but I loved itAndroid turns 10: How Google’s first iPhone rival had a stumbling start

We’ve already seen some fruits of Treble’s labors. Android Pie, the most recent version of its OS, was available for far more phones on launch day than ever before. But we still don’t know when devices like Samsung’s $1,000 Galaxy Note 9 will gets its helping of Pie.

2. Consolidate to one killer messaging app

Google is leagues ahead in its virtual voice assistant, but Apple has nailed the messaging app. So much so that friends, family and even colleagues chorus that the iPhone’s superior iMessage features keep them from switching to Android.

Apple’s Messages app does the basics well, dresses up messages with animated GIFs like Animoji and Memoji (these two work on the iPhone X families only) and reward iPhone users by letting them chat through the same single Messages app over Wi-Fi (that’s iMessages).

Apple also shows your when someone’s responding in real-time (an old desktop messenger trick a la ICQ). But my favorite feature is the ability to sync messages between the iPhone and my MacBook Air’s Messages app. This works seamlessly and keeps me from having to pick up my phone to read and respond to texts.

Then there’s Android’s loose amalgamation of four apps. There’s Messages for mobile, which won’t work over Wi-Fi; it’s for data texting only. Then there’s Allo for mobile messages, Duo for mobile video conferencing and the legacy Google Hangouts for phones and your Gmail inbox.


49
T-Mobile G1: The first Android phone never looked so good

It may not seem like a big deal, but Android’s chaotic messaging story is simply another form of fragmentation, and neither of them can catch Apple’s elegant solo app. Instead of making one messenger your go-to, Google asks you to check up to four — and that’s not even including popular third-party programs like Facebook Messenger and WhatsApp.

Google at least tries to offer some of the iPhone’s cross-platform ease of use with the new Messages for Web, but as a daily user, it’s slow to sync and unreliable. I’ve had to reset it at least a dozen times.

3. Deliver a more intuitive interface

It’s right there in our very first Android phone review: Google’s “overall interface just isn’t as intuitive” compared to the iPhone’s simplicity. Google added a layer of complexity: an app tray to put all your apps so you can arrange your many home screens exactly how you like.

Even from the early days, you could long press the screen to change your wallpaper and add widgets. That spirit of flexibility and tucked-away features makes Android harder to pick up and learn for first-timers. (And yes, Apple’s iOS has also become more complex over time.)

Today, my biggest complaint is with Android Pie’s gesture support and layout. The motions aren’t completely intuitive and the look is imbalanced: you have a pill-shaped button you can press to go Home and swipe right to multitask. But you can’t swipe left; instead, you need to press a back button.

Weird, right? Plenty of phonemakers have figured out how to make swipe navigation good. Google can do better, too.

Now playing:Watch this: See Android P’s new swiping controls up close
2:56
4. Expand Android’s reach beyond phones

For an operating system with so much global vigor, it’s surprising to see Android flail in tablets, smartwatches and TVs. And Android’s health beyond phones is important because other devices complement what you can do on your phone. A great Android laptop, TV and watch make your Android phone more valuable — think about sharing content or data from one device to another.

A dearth of excellent tablet apps has contributed to dwindling interest in Android tablets. Android tablet sales continued to tank in 2018, according to analysts.

When it comes to wearables, the market is healthier than it was, but people are either buying Apple watches or cheaper, more basic fitness bands from Xiaomi, Fitbit and Garmin, according to researcher IDC — not Android smartwatches.

Google and Android have another chance to make a mark. We’ve already seen some watches appear with Google’s rebranded Wear OS. Qualcomm is also energizing the Android smartwatch space with a new chip that promises better battery life. And while there was considerable excitement around the possibility of a Pixel watch bearing the new Wear OS at Google’s Oct. 9 event, that product is apparently not happening — at least, not this year.

Meanwhile, Apple’s emphasis on health in its Apple Watch Series 4 appears to be leaps and bounds ahead of anything Google and its partners have shown us. (At least, it will be, once Apple activates the Watch’s EKG feature later this year.)

As for Android TV, the software has more opportunity overseas than it has in the crowded, competitive US market where Amazon Roku, Fire TV, Apple TV and game consoles dominate. The wild card for streamers and Android TV is Google itself: the tech giant could conceivably juice Android TV by releasing a dedicated, relatively cheap (say $50) streamer under its own name.

Google hasn’t made a move like this since the Nexus Player, which was the first Android TV streaming box. But it’s likelier that Google will continue to use its Chromecast streamer brand, which is more an Android phone accessory that is seeing some downturn lately.

Read also: We’re finally getting the smartwatches we wanted five years ago

Now playing:Watch this: Wear OS featured on multiple watches at IFA 2018
1:23
5. Better syncing from the phone to other devices

For people or families who use the same account on multiple Android devices, syncing is still not quite silky-smooth. When you dismiss a notification on your phone, you still may still see it on your tablet.

Likewise, if you delete a notification from your smartwatch running Wear OS, you’ll see it disappear on your phone, but not on secondary devices like your tablet or Chromebook.

Say it’s been awhile since you’ve turned on one of those devices. When you reboot it again, all those old notifications pop up, regardless of having cleared them on your primary Android device.

Is Android 10 the answer? Probably not

What’s it going to take for Google to shore up these Android imperfections? Unfortunately, probably not the next version of Android, be it Android Q, Android R or Android 10.

Google’s issues run deeper than that. Like many titanic companies, Google’s groups operate somewhat independently, so that the Android folks and messaging folks are on different teams, and may not always know exactly what the other is doing. But we can hope that they get together to create a cohesive messaging system to rival iMessage, true syncing across devices, fast OS upgrades and a better way to simplify the interface, especially with gesture navigation controls.

Android’s next 10 years of success are counting on it.

David Katzmaier and Juan Garzon contributed to this report.

Originally published Sept. 25.
Update, Sept. 26 and Sept. 30: Added more links and context.

Google’s first Android phone rivaled the iPhone like BlackBerry, Nokia never could

Using the first Android in an iPhone world: It was awesome

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Wyndham Grand Asks Guests: Can You Put Down Your Phone For The Sake of Vacation?

An expansion of its innovative Reconnected Family Experience, the unique hotel family program encouraging quality time over screen time, Wyndham Grand is now challenging guests to go phone-free at its pools and restaurants.

An expansion of its innovative Reconnected Family Experience, the unique hotel family program encouraging quality time over screen time, Wyndham Grand is now challenging guests to go phone-free at its pools and restaurants. Today through November 12, the brand will offer optional Phone-Free Zones for guests who wish to spend time unplugged. Guests who participate will have access to special perks, amenities and prizes, including the chance to win 75,000 Wyndham Rewards Points – enough for a future five-night vacation.*

Wyndham Grand is collaborating with Yondr – which creates phone-free spaces using a unique locking phone case – to free guests from the temptation of checking their screens during family time, empowering them to enjoy their vacations. Wyndham Grand is the first hotel brand to partner with Yondr creating physical tech-free spaces within its hotels.

“Before the pull of technology, we would never dream of wasting time on our phones instead of jumping straight into the pool and soaking up every minute of our vacation,” said Lisa Checchio, Chief Marketing Officer for Wyndham. “But today, adults and kids are so glued to their devices that we’ve had to add more pool chairs to accommodate all the poolside swiping. With these Phone-Free Zones, we’re creating new unplugged oases and tech-free tables that challenge families to consciously put the phone away for an afternoon – or just a meal – and make memories simply being together.”

Personal devices are impacting the way today’s families travel, with 53% of people never unplugging or reducing their phone usage on a trip. The average American looks at their screen once every 12 minutes on vacation. Wyndham Grand hotels have seen the effect, witnessing guests toting more than 12 devices per family on a trip – which impacts hotels’ Wi-Fi needs, lobby traffic patterns and pool operations, including added supply of pool chairs.

Power Down, Please
To opt in to a Phone-Free Zone, guests can check in with an attendant at the pool or restaurant, or ask any Wyndham Grand team member about going phone-free. The process is simple:

Guests can visit the Phone-Free Zone and check in with a Wyndham Grand team member at the pool or restaurant to receive a Yondr case. A Wyndham Grand team member will help the guest insert their phone in the Yondr case, which will remain locked while the guest is in the Phone-Free Zone. The phone will remain in the guest’s possession at all times while the case is locked. When ready to access their phone again, guests can simply visit the nearest unlocking station, and with a simple tap, unlock their Yondr case.

Guests who participate will receive access to the space, which includes special perks – think exclusive pool floats and off-menu treats – along with a copy of The Nocturnals: The Mysterious Abductions and a chance to win 75,000 Wyndham Rewards points which they can later redeem for a vacation.*

Phone-Free Zones are available from October 1, 2018 through November 12, 2018 at the following Wyndham Grand hotels offering the Reconnected Family Experience: Wyndham Grand Orlando Bonnet Creek Resort in Orlando, Fla.; Wyndham Grand Clearwater Beach Resort in Clearwater, Fla.; Wyndham Grand Chicago Riverfront in Chicago, Ill.; The Mills House, a Wyndham Grand Hotel in Charleston, S.C.; and Hotel Galvez & Spa, a Wyndham Grand Hotel in Galveston, Texas.

The Reconnected Revolution
Wyndham Grand is bringing quality time back to family vacations withReconnected, a Wyndham Grand Family Experience, a unique family program addressing the dire need for quality time over screen time. While most family travel programs separate parents and kids, Reconnected enables imaginative play time together. Be it building the ultimate blanket fort, creating shadow-puppets or taking a literary adventure with The Nocturnals: The Mysterious Abductions by Tracey Hecht, this new offering reminds families to slow down and enjoy time together, without the distraction of a screen.

About Wyndham Grand
Travel is the best excuse to enjoy the grand things in life. With locations in some of the world’s most sought after vacation destinations – including Shanghai, Istanbul, Doha, Salzburg and Orlando – Wyndham Grand® hotels transform ordinary moments into unforgettable experiences. Decidedly not stuffy, but approachable by design, this upper-upscale hotel brand helps travelers make every moment count. Follow @WyndhamGrand on Facebook and Instagram.

About Wyndham Hotels & Resorts
Wyndham Hotels & Resorts (NYSE: WH) is the world’s largest hotel franchising company, with nearly 9,000 hotels across more than 80 countries on six continents. Through its network of more than 792,000 rooms appealing to the everyday traveler, Wyndham commands a leading presence in both the economy and midscale segments of the lodging industry. The Company operates a portfolio of 20 hotel brands, including Super 8®, Days Inn®, Ramada®, Microtel Inn & Suites®, La Quinta®, Wingate®, AmericInn®, Hawthorn Suites®, The Trademark Collection®, and Wyndham®. Wyndham Hotels & Resorts is also a leading provider of hotel management services, with more than 400 properties under management. The Company’s award-winning Wyndham Rewards loyalty program offers approximately 58 million enrolled members the opportunity to redeem points at thousands of hotels, condominiums and holiday homes globally. For more information, visit www.wyndhamhotels.com.

About Yondr
Yondr creates phone-free spaces for artists, educators, organizations and individuals. In our hyper-connected world, Yondr provides a haven to engage with what you’re doing and who you’re doing it with. In physical space and real time. To learn more, visit overyondr.com.

* NO PURCHASE NECESSARY. A PURCHASE WILL NOT INCREASE YOUR CHANCES OF WINNING. Sweeps begins 10.1.18 & ends 11.12.18. Open to U.S. residents, 21+, who participate in the Phone-Free Zones at participating hotels. Subject to complete official rules, available onsite near the Yondr phone case locking & unlocking stations at participating hotel pools and restaurants, and at wyndhamgrand.com/phonefree. Void where prohibited.

SOURCE Wyndham Hotels & Resorts

Related Links

http://www.wyndhamworldwide.com

The best BT broadband deals in October 2018

Our favourite BT broadband deal:

BT is one of the first names you think of when choosing a broadband provider and its range of packages is varied. If you want BT internet, you can narrow down the best deals above – enter your postcode and we’ll do the rest.

Our favourite BT broadband deal:

BT is one of the first names you think of when choosing a broadband provider and its range of packages is varied. If you want BT internet, you can narrow down the best deals above – enter your postcode and we’ll do the rest.

We’ve found all of the cheapest prices currently on offer for standard speed internet and BT Superfast fibre broadband – just pop in your postcode above and we’ll do the rest. And if you want more than just broadband, we’ll show you the best phone and television deals, too. Down the page, we’ll answer some commonly asked questions about BT internet.

Prefer to order by phone? Then call 0800-587-1366 and speak to an adviser dedicated to BT broadband deals.

See also:Broadband deals | Sky broadband deals | Virgin broadband deals | Fibre broadband deals

BT broadband packages compared – which is the best for me?

All BT broadband deals now feature unlimited data allowances. So the main choice you’ll face with BT is what speed to go for. Standard ADSL broadband gives speeds of up to 17Mb which will probably give you a max download speed of around 2MB per second. Upgrade to BT Superfast – the company’s fibre optic offering – and you can choose between 52Mb and a super fast 76Mb.

After that, you can pay more to add home phone options and a TV subscription – although you may find some package bargains around Black Friday time. The latter includes a YouView box and access to the BT TV package of your choice – more on which below.

BT Unlimited Broadband
BT’s most affordable broadband offer gives up to 17Mb speed – that’s just over 2MB per second. That should still be plenty fast enough to let you browse the web, stream music and watch interruption-free catch-up TV. But it may struggle to cope with larger households all using the internet at once. BT Unlimited Broadband includes:

Up to 17Mb speedBT Home Hub 4 router100GB of BT cloud storageBT Virus Protect for two devices

BT Superfast Fibre Unlimited
If fibre broadband is available where you live and you have a few extra pounds to spare a month, we’d recommend cranking up the speed to BT’s least expensive Superfast deal. At 52Mb (roughly 6.5MB/s), it’s got the legs to seamlessly deliver HD video and fast downloads, even when there are a few of you using it. BT Superfast Fibre Unlimited includes:

Up to 52Mb speedBT Smart Hub100GB of BT cloud storageBT Virus Protect for two devices

BT Superfast Fibre 2 Unlimited
If you demand extremely fast downloads and stream 4K films and TV, then BT’s fastest broadband (76Mb) is well worth considering – especially if you’ve got a bustling household all trying to log in at once. It’s pricey, but BT sweetens the deal with some added extras. BT Superfast Fibre 2 Unlimited includes:

Up to 76Mb speedBT Smart Hub500GB of BT cloud storageBT Virus Protect for 15 devices

What BT router will I get?

BT throws in a router for free (although you’ll have to pay for the delivery). The quality of router you receive will depend on the package you choose.

BT Home Hub Go for standard BT Unlimited Broadband and you’ll get the basic Home Hub 4. You’ve probably seen it sneakily peering at you from around corners in the homes of umpteen friends and families, although its dimensions are sleek enough that you should be able to stow it somewhere subtle without too much trouble. As well as wi-fi, you can also connect to it via an ethernet cable. It’s perfectly functional, but doesn’t have the same strength as the…

BT Smart Hub Pay £65 extra or upgrade to BT Superfast and you’ll receive the more powerful Smart Hub. BT claims that it gives out the UK’s most powerful wi-fi signal among the routers sent out by other major providers. Handy if you live in a big house or like to use your phone or laptop out in the garden.

Alternatively, you can stick with your existing router. But unless you’ve shelled out a lot for your current model, you’re probably better off swallowing the delivery charge and using the BT Home Hub or Smart Hub. That way, if anything goes wrong, you’ll be able to use their tech support.

How long will the contract be?

Take BT broadband, and you’ll be tied into a 18 month contract. After that, your monthly cost will go up by around a tenner. To encourage you to hang around, you can’t use your BT router with any other broadband provider so you’ll need to pay for a new one when you move on.

Are there any BT broadband AND TV deals?

There are three TV packages that you can add to your BT internet package, but you’ll need to sign up for 12 months:

Starter BT is chucking in its Starter TV package if you get Superfast – which includes 80 channels, together with BT’s entry-level YouView box. It costs extra if you go for standard broadband.

Entertainment Plus You can splash out an extra few quid a month for BT’s Entertainment Plus package. This includes 110 channels and a YouView+ box to record up to 300 hours.

Total Entertainment If you’re totally addicted to films and box sets, then it may be worth spending £15-ish a month on Total Entertainment. This is a must if you have a 4K TV, as BT throws in its YouView+ Ultra HD box. It can record 600 hours of video to help you keep abreast of the 141 channels it gives you access to.

What about BT Sport?

Until recently, BT Sport came free with every BT internet plan. That’s come to an end now…you’ll have to pay an extra £3.50 a month to get access to Premier League football, Ashes cricket, top-flight rugby union and exclusive UFC action. Keep your eyes peeled however, as BT does run the occasional promotion where you can still get BT Sport for free.

Can I make calls from a landline?

You can indeed. No matter which BT broadband package you opt for, you get a landline phone number with unlimited weekend calls to other UK landlines. If you prefer nattering in the evening you can pay extra for unlimited landline calls between 7pm and 7am. While more still lets you make as many landline calls as you want at any time of the day. You’ll be covered by free BT Call Protect as well, which will help to halt nuisance calls.

Can I add BT Mobile?

To goad you into bringing all your devices over to BT, it’s offering £5 a month off your monthly mobile phone tariff. BT Mobile has deals on all the biggest and newest handsets, including iPhones and Samsung Galaxys. In particular, that makes BT pretty competitive when it comes to SIM only deals.

What is BT cloud storage?

If you find yourself running out of storage space on your phone, tablet or laptop or want to back up your files, BT has its own cloud storage solution. With BT Unlimited Broadband and Superfast Fibre, you’ll get 100GB – that’s enough room for around 25,000 songs, 140 films or 100,000 photos. It’s 500GB if you go for Superfast 2, which should be sufficient to store the music and photo collections of you and your family.

What is BT Virus Protect?

All BT broadband packages include BT’s internet security tool, BT Virus Protect. As well as promising to vanquish viruses, it features BT Web Protect to flag phishing scams, BT Parental Controls to help you limit the websites your children can see and True Key for easy management of your passwords. As well as your main computer, you can apply BT Virus Protect to one other laptop, phone or tablet if you go for Broadband Unlimited or Superfast Fibre. While Fibre 2 lets you protect up to 15 devices. We still think you should get dedicated internet security however – check out our pick of the best antivirus software.

What’s a BT wi-fi hotspot?

BT has dotted five million wi-fi hotspots around the UK and 18 million around the globe. As a BT Broadband customer, you’ll have access to every one of them. So if you’re on your laptop in a cafe or checking maps on your phone and see that BT Wi-fi is available, you can jump on for free.

Are there any other perks to getting BT broadband?

As well as the discounted mobile tariffs and cut price BT Sport, BT is luring in new customers with a BT Reward Card. This online exclusive means you can claim a prepaid Mastercard cash card if you sign up to BT Broadband.

The sum on the Reward Card changes regularly, but is usually in excess of £50 –
and sometimes as much as £150. The amount on the card is always more with one of the BT Superfast packages.

Is BT broadband any good?

BT relies a lot on its enduring reputation as the most recognisable name in telecommunications, and it remains the most widely used broadband provider in the UK. But that doesn’t necessarily equate to quality. Although it can offer competitive prices and bespoke internet, phone and TV packages, it often sits at the bottom of the list when it comes to customer satisfaction surveys.

How to use the BT broadband checker?

Much like our postcode checker above, BT has its own broadband checker. Pop in your address and phone number and it will let you know what speeds you can expect with BT internet and whether its Superfast broadband is available in your area. If fibre isn’t yet available, you can sign up to BT’s mailing list so that they’ll give you a shout when the cables have been installed.

How do I contact the BT broadband helpline?

If you need help with your broadband or set-up, BT doesn’t exactly make it easy for you to speak to them on the phone. It seems to prefer for you to go through its online support. But if you’re determined to speak to a human, there is a 24/7 number available. Dial 0800-111-4567 if you’re using a landline in the UK, 0330-123-4567 from your mobile or +44179-359-6931 if you’re out of the country.