SHAREHOLDER ALERT: Halper Sadeh LLP Investigates WIFI, WSFS, EGOV, TLND, GWPH; Shareholders are Encouraged to Contact the Firm

New York, April 1, 2021 /PRNewswire/ — Halper Sadeh LLP, a global investor rights law firm, announces it is investigating the following companies:

Boingo Wireless, Inc. (NASDAQ: WIFI) concerning potential violations of the federal securities laws and/or breaches of fiduciary duties relating to its sale to an affiliate of Digital Colony Management, LLC for $14.00 per share in cash.

New York, April 1, 2021 /PRNewswire/ — Halper Sadeh LLP, a global investor rights law firm, announces it is investigating the following companies:

Boingo Wireless, Inc. (NASDAQ: WIFI) concerning potential violations of the federal securities laws and/or breaches of fiduciary duties relating to its sale to an affiliate of Digital Colony Management, LLC for $14.00 per share in cash. If you are a Boingo shareholder,click here to learn more about your rights and options.

WSFS Financial Corporation (NASDAQ: WSFS)concerning potential violations of the federal securities laws and/or breaches of fiduciary duties relating to its merger with Bryn Mawr Bank Corporation. Under the terms of the agreement, stockholders of Bryn Mawr will receive 0.90 of a share of WSFS common stock for each share of Bryn Mawr common stock. If you are a WSFS shareholder, click here to learn more about your rights and options.

NIC Inc. (NASDAQ: EGOV) concerning potential violations of the federal securities laws and/or breaches of fiduciary duties relating to its sale to Tyler Technologies, Inc. for $34.00 per share in cash. If you are an NIC shareholder, click here to learn more about your rights and options.

Talend S.A. (NASDAQ: TLND) concerning potential violations of the federal securities laws and/or breaches of fiduciary duties relating to its sale to Thoma Bravo for $66.00 in cash per ordinary share and American Depositary Share. If you are a Talend shareholder, click here to learn more about your rights and options.

GW Pharmaceuticals plc (NASDAQ: GWPH)concerning potential violations of the federal securities laws and/or breaches of fiduciary duties relating to its sale to Jazz Pharmaceuticals plc for $200.00 in cash and $20.00 in Jazz ordinary shares for each GW American Depositary Share (ADS). If you are a GW Pharmaceuticals shareholder, click here to learn more about your rights and options.

Halper Sadeh LLP may seek increased consideration, additional disclosures and information concerning the proposed transaction, or other relief and benefits on behalf of shareholders.

Shareholders are encouraged to contact the firm free of charge to discuss their legal rights and options. Please call Daniel Sadeh or Zachary Halper at (212) 763-0060 or email [email protected] or [email protected].

Halper Sadeh LLP represents investors all over the world who have fallen victim to securities fraud and corporate misconduct. Our attorneys have been instrumental in implementing corporate reforms and recovering millions of dollars on behalf of defrauded investors.

Attorney Advertising. Prior results do not guarantee a similar outcome.

Contact Information:

Halper Sadeh LLP
Daniel Sadeh, Esq.
Zachary Halper, Esq.
(212) 763-0060
[email protected]
[email protected]
https://www.halpersadeh.com

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Huawei ban timeline: Company reports 2020 revenue growth in China, declines everywhere else – CNET

Huawei is a global telecommunications supplier and phone manufacturer, but remains a pariah in countries like the US. The Chinese firm has come under huge scrutiny in recent years, and countries like the UK and Sweden have banned the use of its equipment in their 5G networks.

Huawei is a global telecommunications supplier and phone manufacturer, but remains a pariah in countries like the US. The Chinese firm has come under huge scrutiny in recent years, and countries like the UK and Sweden have banned the use of its equipment in their 5G networks. Huawei’s phones are also virtually invisible in the US despite their huge popularity around the world.

The company’s chairman predicted that 2020 would be “difficult” for Huawei, and there certainly were challenges. The US continued to pressure allies to block Huawei from their next-generation 5G wireless networks. In July, the UK banned Huawei from its 5G infrastructure: The company’s equipment must be removed by 2027 — a decision that Huawei found “disappointing” as 5G becomes increasingly mainstream — and UK carriers will be unable to install Huawei 5G gear starting in September 2021.

In Belgium, a pro-Huawei influence campaign used fake accounts to criticize legislation that could limit its access to the country’s 5G contracts in December 2020, according to The New York Times.

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Huawei’s phone sales also declined 41.1% year over year for the fourth quarter of 2020, and it reported declining 2020 revenue in every region except its native China (which was enough to make it profitable overall).

The core issue with Huawei has been concerns about its coziness with the Chinese government and fears that its equipment could be used to spy on other countries and companies. It’s the reason why, in 2012, the US banned companies from using Huawei networking equipment and why the company was added to the US Department of Commerce’s Bureau of Industry and Security Entity List in May 2019, following an executive order from then-President Donald Trump that effectively banned Huawei from US communications networks. A year later, Trump extended the order until 2021, and it’s unclear what stance President Joe Biden’s administration will take.

Read more: Huawei’s Mate 40 Pro looks beautiful but don’t buy it and Huawei and China-US tensions: Where do we go from here?

The US initially offered a reprieve to companies, allowing them to work with Huawei through a temporary general license, but the Commerce Department accused the company of exploiting the rules to continue using US technology in its semiconductor design. the US government tightened those rules in August 2020 and said the temporary general license wouldn’t be extended further.

Huawei has long denied any wrongdoing and continues to maintain its innocence.

It can be tough to keep pace with the sheer number of headlines, so here’s a timeline going back to 2018.

2021

April 1, 2021: Huawei reports its revenue grew in 2020, but only in its native China.

March 22, 2021: China reportedly tries two Canadians in secret, in possibleretaliation for a Huawei executive’s 2018 arrest.

March 16, 2021: Huawei prepares to charge phone makers royalties to use its 5G tech as it seeks new revenue sources.

Feb. 26, 2021: Huawei reportedly eyes electric vehicles as sanctions cut into its traditional business.

Feb. 22, 2021: Huawei reveals the Mate X2 foldable phone in China. Meanwhile, an analyst reports that the company dropped to fifth place in global phone sales for the fourth quarter, declining 41.1% year over year.

Feb. 18, 2021: Huawei reportedly tells suppliers its orders for phones will drop by around 60% this year.

Feb. 9, 2021: Huawei founder reportedly expresses confidence in company’s ability to survive. The company also files a lawsuit disputing its designation as a national security threat by the FCC.

Feb. 3, 2021: Huawei says it’ll reveal foldable Mate X2 at Feb. 22 event in China.

Jan. 25, 2021: Huawei reportedly in talks to sell P Series and Mate Series phone brands.

Jan. 18, 2021: Trump administration reportedly hits Huawei’s US suppliers with last-minute restrictions.

Jan. 13, 2021: Huawei patent reportedly refers to tech for identifying Uighur minorities.

2020

Dec. 8, 2020: Huawei reportedly tested facial recognition software that could spot Uighur minorities and set off an alarm.

Dec. 7, 2020: Huawei is reportedly willing to meet Sweden’s requirements after its equipment was banned from the country’s 5G network.

Dec. 4, 2020: The US is reportedly in talks with Huawei finance boss Meng Wanzhou about a deal that’d let her return to China.

Nov. 30, 2020: UK bans installation of Huawei 5G equipment starting in September 2021.

Nov. 26, 2020: UK government commits £250 million ($333 million) to diversify its 5G supply chain following its ban on Huawei.

Nov. 16, 2020: Huawei agrees to sell off Honor phone business to ‘ensure its own survival.’

Nov. 14, 2020: Qualcomm reportedly gets OK to sell 4G chips to Huawei, despite US ban.

Nov. 4, 2020: Huawei sues Trump administration to force release of documents linked to CFO’s arrest.

Nov. 2, 2020: Huawei reportedly works on plan for dedicated Shanghai chip plant to get around US restrictions.

Oct. 29, 2020:Potential Huawei ban raises concerns over 5G in Brazil.

Oct. 28, 2020: BT and Ericsson sign 5G deal as Huawei ban takes shape.

Oct. 26, 2020: Huawei CFO’s trial begins in Canada.

Oct. 20, 2020: Sweden bans Huawei from its 5G networks.

Oct. 8, 2020: UK Parliament cites “clear evidence” Huawei colluded with Chinese state.

Oct. 1, 2020: UK found a flaw of “national significance” in Huawei tech, a government report says.

Sept. 30, 2020: China reportedly prepares antitrust probe into Google following Huawei prompt.

Sept. 29, 2020: BT picks Nokia to power 5G networks as UK starts to phase out Huawei.

Sept. 23, 2020: Huawei chairman labels ongoing US bans as “non-stop aggression.”

Sept. 10, 2020: Huawei says it’s bringing Harmony OS to phones and expanding it to other hardware-makers. It also reveals new headphones, watches and laptops.

Sept. 4, 2020: FCC estimates it’ll cost $1.8B to remove Huawei, ZTE equipment from US networks.

Read more:Not just Huawei: A guide to China’s biggest and best smartphone makers

Aug. 24, 2020: India will quietly remove Huawei equipment from its networks as border tensions rise, a report says.

Aug. 19, 2020: Huawei says its older Android phones will continue to get software and security updates even though its Google license has expired.

Aug. 17, 2020: US tightens restrictions on Huawei’s access to American chips.

Aug. 13, 2020: India takes steps to lock Huawei and ZTE out of its 5G rollout.

July 30, 2020: Huawei takes Samsung’s crown to become world’s biggest phone maker, analyst says.

July 29, 2020: Qualcomm settles long-running Huawei patent spat.

July 20, 2020: China reportedly considers action against Nokia and Ericsson if EU bans Huawei.

July 15, 2020: Trump administration hits Huawei workers with US visa restrictions.

July 14, 2020: UK follows US in banning Huawei from its 5G network.

July 3, 2020: Huawei brings Uber rival Bolt to its AppGallery store.

June 30, 2020: Huawei and ZTE officially designated national security threats by FCC.

June 25, 2020: Trump administration designates Huawei as backed by Chinese military.

June 17, 2020: Huawei reveals which phones will get EMUI 10.1 update.

June 15, 2020: Commerce Department lets US companies work with Huawei on developing 5G standards.

June 10, 2020: NATO boss supports the UK’s review of Huawei’s role in its 5G rollout.

June 9, 2020: Huawei insists it “grew up in the UK” and wants to play a significant role in the country’s 5G deployment.

June 4, 2000: Documents reportedly reveal Huawei covered up ownership of Iranian affiliate in scheme to sell prohibited US tech.

June 3, 2000: Canadian telecoms effectively lock Huawei out of country’s 5G development.

June 2, 2020: US Senator Tom Cotton tells British politicians he thinks China is trying to use Huawei to “drive a hi-tech wedge between” America and the UK.

June 1, 2020: Huawei reportedly turns to rival chipmakers to weather US clampdown.

May 27, 2020: Huawei CFO loses case to dismiss extradition to the US.

May 26, 2020: UK launches fresh probe into Huawei’s role in future 5G plans. Huawei announces partnership with Youtube rival Dailymotion.

May 22, 2020: British Prime Minister Boris Johnson reportedly looks to reduce Huawei’s role in country’s 5G networks.

May 18, 2020: Huawei criticizes new US rules as “pernicious” and “arbitrary,” and China reportedly prepares to take “forceful countermeasures” against US tech companies.

May 15, 2020: Commerce Department tightens export controls on Huawei, and extends Temporary General License for another 90 days.

May 14, 2020: Trump extends executive order targeting Huawei for another year.

May 7, 2020: US rule might let American companies work with Huawei on 5G.

May 1, 2020: Huawei Australia’s carrier business drops 21% for 2019 as 5G ban bites.

April 29, 2020: Huawei reportedly expands partnership with European chipmaker in the face of increasing US restrictions on suppliers.

April 21, 2020: Huawei reports 1.4% revenue increase for the first quarter of 2020 as it grapples with the coronavirus pandemic. Also, senior British official reportedly says UK is unlikely to reconsider “firm” decision to allow Huawei access to non-sensitive parts of its 5G network.

April 20, 2020: Huawei founder Ren Zhengfei downplays his influence over the company in a South China Morning Post profile.

April 17, 2020: Chinese teaser video showcases Huawei’s Nova 7 phone series ahead April 23 reveal.

April 15, 2020: BT delays removal of Huawei equipment from EE’s core network by two years.

April 13, 2020: Huawei warns that disrupting its involvement in Britain’s 5G rollout would do the country “a disservice.”

April 2, 2020: Huawei signs non-aggression patent pact as it joins Open Invention Network.

March 31, 2020: Huawei reports smallest profit increase in three years as US ban takes its toll.

March 27, 2020: Huawei reportedly starts working on cloud gaming platform with Tencent, the biggest games company in the world.

March 26, 2020: Huawei reveals P40 Pro Plus, P40 Pro and P40, along with smart assistant Celia. Also, senior US officials reportedly agree on new rules to cut Huawei off from global chip suppliers.

Now playing:Watch this: Huawei unveils P40, P40 Pro and Pro Plus
10:57

March 24, 2020: Huawei P40 and P40 Pro apparently leak online ahead of launch.

March 12, 2020: Trump signs law to prevent US rural telecom carriers from using Huawei network equipment, and France is reportedly planning to allow some Huawei gear in its 5G network.

March 11, 2020: US officials reportedly postpone a meeting on potential new restrictions on sales of technology to Huawei and China, and the Commerce Department extends Huawei license through May 15.

March 9, 2020: Huawei cancels P40 launch event due to coronavirus, and US envoy reportedly presses Canada over Huawei role in 5G network.

March 6, 2020: Huawei reportedly projects major drop in phone sales amid US sanctions.

March 4, 2020: Nokia and Ericsson pitch themselves to US lawmakers as Huawei 5G alternative. Also, Huawei pleads not guilty to new US criminal charges in 2018 case and FCC’s Brendan Carr says US “cannot treat Huawei as anything other than a threat to our collective security.”

March 3, 2020: US senators urge UK to reconsider use of Huawei gear in its 5G network.

March 2, 2020: Leaked documents reportedly reveal Huawei’s role in shipping prohibited US gear to Iran.

Related story: Huawei P40 Pro specs, P40 Pro Plus and P40 vs. P30 Pro and Mate 30 Pro: What’s new and what’s different?

Feb. 28, 2020: Huawei will spend €200 million on new 5G plant in France.

Feb. 27, 2020: FCC starts collecting data on Huawei use in US networks, and Senate passes bill banning government purchases of Huawei gear.

Feb. 26, 2020: Officials from Huawei and Defense Department spar at cybersecurity panel.

Feb. 24, 2020: Huawei will launch its P40 Pro in Paris on March 26, its upgraded Mate XS foldable will be available outside China and the company is bringing a new tablet, speaker and green MateBook X Pro laptop to Europe. And Trump reportedly accuses British Prime Minister Boris Johnson of “betrayal” in a heated phone call about Huawei 5G decision.

Feb. 23, 2020: Google warns people against sideloading its apps on Huawei’s P40 phones.

Feb. 21, 2020: The White House reportedly is planning a 5G summit to combat Huawei.

Feb. 20, 2020: Huawei makes an aggressive 5G infrastructure product pitch to European nations.

Feb. 18, 2020: A judge dismisses a Huawei suit challenging the US government’s equipment ban.

Feb. 14, 2020: Huawei gets another 45-day reprieve from Commerce Department.

Feb. 13, 2020: The Justice Department charges Huawei with racketeering and theft of trade secrets.

Feb. 11, 2020: The US reportedly finds Huawei has backdoor access to mobile networks globally.

Feb. 7, 2020: Attorney General William Barr suggests that US take a “controlling stake” in Ericsson or Nokia to counter Huawei.

Feb, 6, 2020: Huawei hits Verizon with lawsuits alleging patent infringement, and it’ll reportedly join forces with Vivo and Oppo against Google Play Store.

Feb. 5, 2020: Vodafone says implementing UK and European Huawei restrictions could take five years.

Feb. 3, 2020: Huawei asks FCC to drop national “unlawful and misguided” security risk label, and updates its “ultralight” MateBook D laptops.

Jan. 30, 2020: Australian politicians dismiss talk of revisiting Huawei 5G ban.

Jan. 29, 2020: EU allows Huawei for 5G, but warns states to limit core network access.

Jan. 28, 2020: UK gives Huawei the green light to build the country’s non-core 5G network, with some limitations, while an analyst says Huawei is the world’s top 5G phone vendor.

Jan. 24, 2020: The Pentagon reportedly blocked even tighter rules on US companies selling to Huawei.

Jan. 23, 2020: Huawei postpones its China developers conference due to deadly coronavirus outbreak.

Jan. 20, 2020: Huawei will use TomTom’s navigation software and data after losing Google Maps.

Jan. 16, 2020: Huawei Mate XS foldable phone will reportedly be cheaper and smaller, while images of purported Huawei P40 Pro hint at many camera features.

Jan. 15, 2020: Huawei shipped nearly 7 million 5G phones last year, and it’s reportedly spending $26 million courting developers to build apps for its phones.

Jan. 14, 2020: The US presses British officials to block Huawei from its 5G network, and US senators propose over $1B in 5G subsidies to counter Huawei dominance.

Jan. 9, 2020: Sen. Tom Cotton unveils a bill to stop the US from sharing intelligence with countries that use Huawei 5G technology.

Jan. 7, 2020: Huawei is allowed to participate in India’s 5G trial phase.

Read more: China wants to dominate the most important tech of our time

2019

Dec. 31, 2019: Huawei boosted phone sales in 2019 but predicts a “difficult” 2020.

Dec. 26, 2019: Huawei rebuts suggestions that Chinese state support drove its growth.

Dec. 20, 2019: Huawei’s new P40 Pro rumored to have 10x optical zoom.

Dec. 19, 2019: Greenland opts for Sweden’s Ericsson over Huawei for 5G rollout.

Dec. 18, 2019: Huawei opens 5G innovation center in London.

Dec. 17, 2019: Huawei will launch the P40 Pro in March without Google support, and Spain’sTelefonica says it’ll drastically reduce Huawei gear use for its core 5G network.

Dec. 16, 2019: US House of Representatives passes bill barring government from buying Huawei gear.

Dec. 15, 2019: Norway’s Telenor says Huawei will still play a role in the country’s 5G rollout.

Dec. 13, 2019: Huawei CFO Meng Wanzhou wins court order to receive documents for her arrest and extradition.

Dec. 8, 2019: Huawei will bring Harmony OS to more products next year, but not phones.

Dec. 5, 2019: UK Prime Minister Boris Johnson takes selfie with Huawei phone after hinting at ban.

Dec. 4, 2019: Huawei slams FCC’s new restrictions as unconstitutional in legal challenge.

Dec. 3, 2019: Huawei cut US components out of Mate 30 in wake of Trump’s ban, and US judge disqualifies Huawei lawyer from fraud and sanctions case, citing conflict of interest.

Dec. 2, 2019: Huawei predicts Australia’s 5G ban will force it to cut 1,500 jobs.

Now playing:Watch this: What is going on between Huawei and the US?
4:59

Nov. 29, 2019: Huawei will apparently fight the FCC decision to exclude it from federal subsidies.

Nov. 26, 2019: Huawei and Samsung see jump in phone sales for third quarter, while others see decline.

Nov. 25, 2019: Huawei unveils its iPad Pro rival, the MatePad Pro, for China.

Nov. 22, 2019: The FCC bars Huawei and ZTE from billions in federal subsidies, while senators want Trump to halt licenses that let US companies sell to Huawei.

Nov. 21, 2019: Microsoft scores license to export software to Huawei.

Now playing:Watch this: Huawei P40 Pro and Plus first impressions: CNET editors…
5:24

Nov. 20, 2019: Huawei Mate X’s folding screen costs $1,000 to fix.

Nov. 19, 2019: Huawei says US license extension doesn’t change the fact that it’s being treated unfairly.

Nov. 12, 2019: Huawei is reportedly giving staff $286 million in bonuses for sticking through US ban.

Nov. 8, 2019: Trump’s tech chief slams countries for “opening their arms” to Huawei.

Nov. 7, 2019: Huawei founder says the company’s coping fine with the US trade ban, but stresses the need for open collaboration.

Nov. 5, 2019: Hungary will reportedly work with Huawei in building its 5G network.

Nov. 4, 2019: US Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross says licenses allowing US companies to sell equipment to Huawei “will be forthcoming very shortly.”

Nov. 1, 2019: Huawei might be working on an iPad Pro-style tablet.

Related story: Huawei Watch GT 2e gets a sporty look, new health features.

Oct. 31, 2019: The UK general election has apparently delayed the decision on giving Huawei access to the UK’s 5G network again. Also, Huawei ships 66.7 million phones in 2019’s third quarter.

Oct. 28, 2019: The Federal Communications Commission says it’ll cut off funding to wireless carriers using Huawei and ZTE equipment.

Huawei Mate X: Our best look yet at the foldable phoneSee all photos



+29 More

Oct. 23, 2019: Huawei launches the Mate X foldable phone in China and celebrates hitting 200 million phone shipments two months sooner than it did last year. Also, the company’s cybersecurity chief says it’d be easier to bribe telecom staff than build backdoors into networks.

Oct. 21, 2019: A Huawei executive acknowledges the company’s struggling without Google support.

Oct. 16, 2019: Huawei sold a whole bunch of phones despite the US ban, while a Mate X unboxing video hints at the foldable phone’s imminent release. Also, Germany caused an uproar with draft network security rules that would let Huawei work on its 5G networks.

Oct. 15, 2019: Huawei and Sunrise co-build a 5G research center in Switzerland.

Oct. 9, 2019: Trump is reportedly ready to approve sales of US goods to Huawei.

Oct. 4, 2019: Malaysian telecom Maxis signs up with Huawei for 5G.

Oct. 2, 2019: Huawei Mate 30 phones apparently lose backdoor access to Google apps.

Related story: Can Huawei Mate 30 Pro’s camera beat iPhone 11’s? These photos speak for themselves.

Sept. 30, 2019: Huawei opens flagship store in Shenzhen.

Sept. 26, 2019: Huawei apparently is making 5G base stations without US parts, and Norway says it won’t ban the company from its 5G rollout.

Sept. 19, 2019: Huawei unveils the Mate 30 Pro phone, Watch GT 2 and Vision TV during an event in Munich.

Sept. 18, 2019: Huawei urges Australia to embrace Chinese products during its “explosion of innovation,” and its Mate 30 event lineup apparently leaks a day early.

Sept. 12, 2019: Huawei’s founder is ready to sell his company’s 5G tech to a Western buyer. Separately, Huawei is selling MateBook laptops with Linux preinstalled in China.

Sept. 10, 2019: Huawei drops a lawsuit against the US government after its telecom equipment is returned.

Sept. 9, 2019: Microsoft President Brad Smith wants the US government to offer more evidence to back up its Huawei ban. Also, US prosecutors charge a Chinese professor with fraud for allegedly taking a California company’s tech for Huawei’s benefit.

Sept. 8, 2019: Huawei’s Mate X foldable phone could go on sale in October.

Sept. 6, 2019: Huawei skirts US ban with “new” P30 Pro, but only the colors are new. It also shows off the 5G Kirin 990 chip that’ll power its Mate 30.

Sept. 3, 2019: Huawei accuses US of using cyberattacks and threats to disrupt its business. It also intends to give universities $300 million annually despite the US trade ban.

Sept. 2, 2019: Huawei announces that the Mate 30 series launches Sept. 19.

Now playing:Watch this: Huawei shows off Bluetooth smart glasses
0:52

Aug 27, 2019: US reportedly receives more than 130 requests for Huawei licenses, but none have been issued yet. Also, new Huawei phones reportedly won’t be able to use Android.

Aug. 23, 2019: Huawei reckons the US ban will cost its phone division $10 billion, and sheds 100 Australian jobs after being banned from country’s 5G rollout.

Aug. 22, 2019: Huawei says it has no plans to launch a Harmony-powered phone.

Related story: HarmonyOS: What’s with Huawei’s Android-replacement operating system?

Aug. 19, 2019: US Commerce Department extends reprieve allowing companies to work with Huawei.

Aug. 18, 2019: Trump says he doesn’t want to do business with Huawei due to the “national security threat” it represents.

Aug. 16, 2019: Huawei’s founder expresses confidence that UK “won’t say no to us” in its 5G rollout.

Aug. 15, 2019: Huawei pushes back the launch of its Mate X again, and might be working on its own version of Google Maps.

Aug. 14, 2019: Huawei is apparently researching 6G wireless internet connectivity.

Aug. 13, 2019: India remains undecided on letting Huawei sell its 5G networking equipment in the country.

Aug. 9, 2019: Huawei unveils its Android replacement “Harmony,” while Trump says the US won’t do business with Huawei.

Aug. 7, 2019: Trump administration says it’ll ban government from doing business with Huawei, and Republican senators target Google over Huawei project.

Aug. 6, 2019: Huawei Twitter poll reveals its followers think it’s owned by the Chinese government, but people on Facebook disagree.

Aug. 4, 2019: Huawei will reportedly release a cheap phone powered by its Hongmeng OS in late 2019.

July 31, 2019: Huawei beat iPhone with 17% global market share in 2019’s second quarter, research firm said.

July 30, 2019: Huawei reported revenue surge despite US ban, and Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross said Trump administration could decide on licenses allowing Huawei sales by next week.

July 29, 2019: Huawei and Google were reportedly working on a smart speaker before ban.

July 26, 2019: Chinese authorities suspect FedEx illegally held back over 100 Huawei packages, report said.

July 25, 2019: Electronics company reportedly “seized” $100M of Huawei goods following US ban.

July 24, 2019: United Arab Emirates telecom says US ban on Huawei isn’t an issue for its 5G network.

July 23, 2019: Huawei lays off more than 600 US workers due to blacklisting.

July 22, 2019: Leaked documents suggested that Huawei secretly helped build North Korea’s wireless network. Also, the White House gathering tech execs for a meeting where Trump reportedly said Huawei licensing deals will be “timely.”

July 19, 2019: Huawei says Hongmeng OS isn’t designed as an Android replacement.

July 16, 2019: Bipartisan group of senators introduces 5G legislation that would keep Huawei blacklisted.

July 15, 2019: Canada may wait until after October elections to decide on Huawei ban, while the US will reportedly let Huawei sell to companies within weeks. Also, Huawei reportedly plans major layoffs at its US research labs.

July 9, 2019: US will allow licensed sales to Huawei, but it remains blacklisted.

July 7, 2019: Huawei CEO says its HongMeng OS alternative is ‘likely’ faster than Android, but needs its own app store.

July 4, 2019: US government tries to get Huawei lawsuit thrown out.

July 3, 2019: Huawei remains on Commerce Department’s blacklist despite Trump’s latest decision.

July 2, 2019: Huawei reportedly isn’t sure about using Android in future phones.

July 1, 2019: Trump official says eased Huawei restrictions only apply to widely available products.

June 29, 2019: Trump decides to lift some restrictions on US companies selling to Huawei.

June 27, 2019: Huawei employees worked on Chinese military research projects, according to a report from Bloomberg.

June 25, 2019: US companies are reportedly bypassing the Trump ban on sales to Huawei, while FedEx is suing the Commerce Department over the diversion of Huawei packages.

June 24, 2019: Huawei says it’ll increase its 5G investment in spite of US ban, while attorneys for its imprisoned CFO have asked for the US extradition request to be withdrawn. Also, an FCC commissioner wants Huawei gear out of US networks, and the Trump administration reportedly is thinking about requiring domestic 5G equipment to be made outside China.

June 21, 2019: Huawei unveils a trio of new Nova 5 phones in China as US tensions simmer, and its Mate X foldable phone will reportedly launch by September. The US also blacklists five more Chinese tech companies.

June 19, 2019: Huawei’s CEO isn’t worried about $30 billion revenue hit from US ban.

June 18, 2019: Huawei boss predicts $30B revenue hit from US ban, but Microsoft starts selling its laptops again.

June 13, 2019: Chinese ambassador warns Britain that excluding Huawei from 5G sends a “bad signal.”

June 12, 2019: Huawei reportedly moves to trademark its own OS, and apparently chases Verizon for $1B in patent licensing fees.

June 11, 2019: Huawei says it’ll need more time to become world’s biggest phone seller and reportedly delays announcement of its new laptop indefinitely.

June 10, 2019: Huawei reportedly asks app developers to publish on its AppGallery store, and a White House official apparently wants to delay the US government’s Huawei ban.

June 7, 2019: Facebook stops letting Huawei preinstall its apps, and Google reportedly warns the Trump administration that its Huawei ban creates a national security risk. Also, Huawei CFO Meng Wanzhou’s extradition hearing is set for January 2020.

June 6, 2019: Russian telecom agrees to let Huawei develop country’s 5G network, while China gives Huawei a boost by issuing 5G licenses.

June 5, 2019: Huawei chairman says company would sign a “no-spy” deal with US.

June 4, 2019: Huawei trade secrets trial reportedly kicks off in Texas.

June 3, 2019: Science publisher IEEE reverses its week-old ban on Huawei scientists reviewing technical papers.

June 2, 2019: Huawei reportedly strips back production of phones amid US crackdown.

Honor 9X is the last Huawei phone to use AndroidSee all photos



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May 31, 2019: Huawei reportedly orders employees to cancel US meetings, mirrors Consumer Technology Association’s criticism of Trump’s plans to impose higher tariffs on imported Mexican goods.

May 30, 2019: Huawei membership restored by SD Association and Wi-Fi Alliance, while it quietly launches its 5G lab in the shadow of the US ban. Also, its wearables shipments quadruple in first quarter.

May 29, 2019: Huawei asks court to rule US ban unconstitutional.

May 28, 2019: Huawei reportedly plans to bring OS to China later this year, internationally in 2020.

May 26, 2019: Huawei’s founder says he’d “be the first to protest” if China retaliated against Apple.

May 24, 2019: Huawei’s operating system may be called “Hongmeng,” while Amazon Japan reportedly stops selling its devices.

May 23, 2019: US reportedly accuses Huawei of lying about Chinese ties.

May 22, 2019: Chip designer Arm ditches Huawei, while Mate 20 X gets dropped from UK 5G launch.

May 21, 2019: Huawei reportedly wants its app store to compete with Google’s.

May 20, 2019: Huawei gets a temporary reprieve from the US trade ban, prompting Google to revive work temporarily.

May 19, 2019: Google cuts off Huawei phones from future Android updates.

May 16, 2019: Huawei says US ban will ‘significantly harm’ American jobs and companies.

May 15, 2019: Trump effectively bans Huawei with a national security order.

May 8, 2019: 5G rollout may face a delay in UK over Huawei investigations.

May 3, 2019: Countries draft 5G security proposals as the US warns again of Huawei’s threat.

May 2, 2019: A Huawei leak prompts the sacking of UK defense minister Gavin Williamson.

May 1, 2019: Huawei hits 50% growth in phone sales and reportedly has an 8K 5G TV in the works for later this year.

April 30, 2019: Vodafone found hidden backdoors in Huawei equipment, according to a report.

April 24, 2019: Britain will reportedly allow Huawei limited access to 5G infrastructure. Several days later, China pushes Britain to let Huawei be part of 5G rollout.

April 21, 2019: The CIA reportedly says Huawei is funded by Chinese state security.

April 11, 2019: Google and Huawei will pay Nexus 6P owners for bootloop issues in class-action lawsuit.

April 9, 2019: The US reportedly no longer demands a Huawei ban in Germany.

April 8, 2019: Huawei is “open” to selling its 5G chips to Apple, says report.

April 4, 2019: Huawei sets new goals to overtake Samsung and Apple, and MIT severs links with Huawei and ZTE due to US investigations.

Mate X foldable phone: Here’s what it’s really like to useSee all photos



+33 More

March 29, 2019: Huawei slams US for having “a loser’s attitude” because its tech can’t compete.

March 28, 2019: British watchdog warns that Huawei products represent “significantly increased risk.”

March 26, 2019: Huawei launches the P30 and P30 Pro in Paris.

March 19, 2019: Angela Merkel pushes back against US pressure to bar Huawei from Germany’s 5G rollout.

March 15, 2019: Huawei’s CFO wanted to quit before arrest, according to the company’s founder.

March 14, 2019: Huawei is developing its own OS in case it can’t use Android or Windows, report says.

March 12, 2019: US reportedly tells Germany to drop Huawei or it’ll limit intelligence sharing. The Huawei Mate 20 hits 10 million shipped.

March 8, 2019: Huawei sues the US government over its equipment ban.

March 5, 2019: Huawei reportedly calls for international cybersecurity standards.

March 1, 2019: An extradition hearing for Huawei’s CFO gets the go-ahead from Canada, and the US warns the Philippines against using Huawei 5G gear.

Now playing:Watch this: Huawei shows off new laptop, speaker and tablet for Europe
1:57

Feb. 28, 2019: Chinese kids literally sing Huawei’s praises in surreal video.

Feb. 26, 2019: Samsung and Huawei settle 2-year-old patent dispute.

Feb. 25, 2019: Huawei could face a solar tech ban in the US.

Feb. 24, 2019: Huawei unveils the Mate X foldable phone.

Feb. 22, 2019: Italian politicians reportedly push for Huawei 5G ban.

Feb. 21, 2019: Secretary of State Mike Pompeo says countries using Huawei tech pose a risk to the US.

Feb. 20-21, 2019: Ren Zhengfei says that the arrest of his daughter, the company’s CFO, was “politically motivated and that the US treats 5G like “military” tech.

Feb. 19, 2019: Ren tells the BBC “there’s no way the US can crush us.”

Feb. 17, 2019: The UK reportedly concludes that using Huawei in 5G is a manageable risk.

Feb. 6, 2019: US State Department discourages European countries from using Huawei equipment in their 5G rollouts.

Feb. 4, 2019: A report says the FBI raided a Huawei lab and set up a CES sting. Also, two of the company’s staff were expelled from Denmark after a work permit inspection.

The charges unsealed today clearly allege that Huawei intentionally conspired to steal the intellectual property of an American company.
FBI Director Christopher Wray, Jan. 29, 2019

Jan. 30, 2019: Qualcomm reaches an interim licensing agreement with Huawei.

Jan. 29, 2019: US hammers Huawei with 23 indictments for alleged trade secret theft and fraud.

Jan. 25, 2019: Colleges reportedly drop Huawei equipment to appease the Trump administration. Also, Huawei says it’ll reveal a foldable phone with 5G in February.

Jan. 24, 2019: Huawei reportedly says it’ll take the smartphone crown from Samsung by 2020.

Jan. 23, 2019: Huawei’s CFO may face formal extradition to the US, report says.

Jan. 18, 2019: China says a Canadian ban on Huawei’s 5G tech will trigger “repercussions.”

Jan. 11, 2019: In Poland, a Huawei employee gets arrested over alleged spying.Three days later, Huawei sacks that employee.

Jan. 8, 2019: Huawei fights to stay in the US with laptops and tablets at CES.

Jan. 4, 2019: Senators introduce a bipartisan bill to address concerns about Chinese tech companies.

Jan. 3, 2019: A report suggests that President Trump may use an executive order to ban Huawei and ZTE purchases.

Read: Huawei could survive without Android, but not very well

2018

Dec. 24, 2018: Huawei exceeds 200 million smartphone shipments.

Dec. 12, 2018: A Canadian court grants Huawei’s CFO $10 million bail.

Dec. 7, 2018: Reuters reports that Japan will stop buying Huawei, ZTE equipment.

Dec. 6, 2018: Huawei CFO Meng Wanzhou is arrested in Canada at the request of the US.

Dec. 5, 2018: Britain’s BT says it’ll strip Huawei equipment from 4G network by 2021 and won’t use it in 5G core.

Oct. 18, 2018: Huawei tussles with US startup CNEX Labs over theft of technology.

Huawei P30 Pro’s camera put to the test in ParisSee all photos



+21 More

Sept. 7, 2018: Huawei gets caught cheating on a phone benchmark test.

Sept. 5, 2018: In a Senate hearing on Facebook and Twitter, Huawei and ZTE get called out.

Aug. 1, 2018: Knocking off Apple, Huawei becomes the No. 2 phone seller.

July 19, 2018: Huawei crosses 100 million shipments mark for the year to date.

July 11, 2018: Australia says it’ll ban Huawei from 5G rollout amid security concerns.

June 7, 2018: Congress calls out Google over its ties with Huawei.

June 6, 2018: A report reveals that Facebook gave Huawei special access to user data.

May 2, 2018: The Pentagon bans the sale of Huawei and ZTE phones on US military bases.

March 22, 2018: Huawei loses Best Buy as retail partner.

Feb. 13, 2018: FBI Director Chris Wray warns against buying Huawei and ZTE phones.

Jan. 9, 2018: At CES, Huawei CEO Richard Yu addresses the loss of AT&T support.

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Huawei ban timeline: Company reports 2020 revenue growth in China, declines elsewhere – CNET

Huawei is a global telecommunications supplier and phone manufacturer, but remains a pariah in countries like the US. The Chinese firm has come under huge scrutiny in recent years, and countries like the UK and Sweden have banned the use of its equipment in their 5G networks.

Huawei is a global telecommunications supplier and phone manufacturer, but remains a pariah in countries like the US. The Chinese firm has come under huge scrutiny in recent years, and countries like the UK and Sweden have banned the use of its equipment in their 5G networks. Huawei’s phones are also virtually invisible in the US despite their huge popularity around the world.

The company’s chairman predicted that 2020 would be “difficult” for Huawei, and there certainly were challenges. The US continued to pressure allies to block Huawei from their next-generation 5G wireless networks. In July, the UK banned Huawei from its 5G infrastructure: The company’s equipment must be removed by 2027 — a decision that Huawei found “disappointing” as 5G becomes increasingly mainstream — and UK carriers will be unable to install Huawei 5G gear starting in September 2021.

In Belgium, a pro-Huawei influence campaign used fake accounts to criticize legislation that could limit its access to the country’s 5G contracts in December 2020, according to The New York Times.

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Huawei’s phone sales also declined 41.1% year over year for the fourth quarter of 2020, and it reported declining 2020 revenue in every region except its native China (which was enough to make it profitable overall).

The core issue with Huawei has been concerns about its coziness with the Chinese government and fears that its equipment could be used to spy on other countries and companies. It’s the reason why, in 2012, the US banned companies from using Huawei networking equipment and why the company was added to the US Department of Commerce’s Bureau of Industry and Security Entity List in May 2019, following an executive order from then-President Donald Trump that effectively banned Huawei from US communications networks. A year later, Trump extended the order until 2021, and it’s unclear what stance President Joe Biden’s administration will take.

Read more: Huawei’s Mate 40 Pro looks beautiful but don’t buy it and Huawei and China-US tensions: Where do we go from here?

The US initially offered a reprieve to companies, allowing them to work with Huawei through a temporary general license, but the Commerce Department accused the company of exploiting the rules to continue using US technology in its semiconductor design. the US government tightened those rules in August 2020 and said the temporary general license wouldn’t be extended further.

Huawei has long denied any wrongdoing and continues to maintain its innocence.

It can be tough to keep pace with the sheer number of headlines, so here’s a timeline going back to 2018.

2021

April 1, 2021: Huawei reports its revenue grew in 2020, but only in its native China.

March 22, 2021: China reportedly tries two Canadians in secret, in possibleretaliation for a Huawei executive’s 2018 arrest.

March 16, 2021: Huawei prepares to charge phone makers royalties to use its 5G tech as it seeks new revenue sources.

Feb. 26, 2021: Huawei reportedly eyes electric vehicles as sanctions cut into its traditional business.

Feb. 22, 2021: Huawei reveals the Mate X2 foldable phone in China. Meanwhile, an analyst reports that the company dropped to fifth place in global phone sales for the fourth quarter, declining 41.1% year over year.

Feb. 18, 2021: Huawei reportedly tells suppliers its orders for phones will drop by around 60% this year.

Feb. 9, 2021: Huawei founder reportedly expresses confidence in company’s ability to survive. The company also files a lawsuit disputing its designation as a national security threat by the FCC.

Feb. 3, 2021: Huawei says it’ll reveal foldable Mate X2 at Feb. 22 event in China.

Jan. 25, 2021: Huawei reportedly in talks to sell P Series and Mate Series phone brands.

Jan. 18, 2021: Trump administration reportedly hits Huawei’s US suppliers with last-minute restrictions.

Jan. 13, 2021: Huawei patent reportedly refers to tech for identifying Uighur minorities.

2020

Dec. 8, 2020: Huawei reportedly tested facial recognition software that could spot Uighur minorities and set off an alarm.

Dec. 7, 2020: Huawei is reportedly willing to meet Sweden’s requirements after its equipment was banned from the country’s 5G network.

Dec. 4, 2020: The US is reportedly in talks with Huawei finance boss Meng Wanzhou about a deal that’d let her return to China.

Nov. 30, 2020: UK bans installation of Huawei 5G equipment starting in September 2021.

Nov. 26, 2020: UK government commits £250 million ($333 million) to diversify its 5G supply chain following its ban on Huawei.

Nov. 16, 2020: Huawei agrees to sell off Honor phone business to ‘ensure its own survival.’

Nov. 14, 2020: Qualcomm reportedly gets OK to sell 4G chips to Huawei, despite US ban.

Nov. 4, 2020: Huawei sues Trump administration to force release of documents linked to CFO’s arrest.

Nov. 2, 2020: Huawei reportedly works on plan for dedicated Shanghai chip plant to get around US restrictions.

Oct. 29, 2020:Potential Huawei ban raises concerns over 5G in Brazil.

Oct. 28, 2020: BT and Ericsson sign 5G deal as Huawei ban takes shape.

Oct. 26, 2020: Huawei CFO’s trial begins in Canada.

Oct. 20, 2020: Sweden bans Huawei from its 5G networks.

Oct. 8, 2020: UK Parliament cites “clear evidence” Huawei colluded with Chinese state.

Oct. 1, 2020: UK found a flaw of “national significance” in Huawei tech, a government report says.

Sept. 30, 2020: China reportedly prepares antitrust probe into Google following Huawei prompt.

Sept. 29, 2020: BT picks Nokia to power 5G networks as UK starts to phase out Huawei.

Sept. 23, 2020: Huawei chairman labels ongoing US bans as “non-stop aggression.”

Sept. 10, 2020: Huawei says it’s bringing Harmony OS to phones and expanding it to other hardware-makers. It also reveals new headphones, watches and laptops.

Sept. 4, 2020: FCC estimates it’ll cost $1.8B to remove Huawei, ZTE equipment from US networks.

Read more:Not just Huawei: A guide to China’s biggest and best smartphone makers

Aug. 24, 2020: India will quietly remove Huawei equipment from its networks as border tensions rise, a report says.

Aug. 19, 2020: Huawei says its older Android phones will continue to get software and security updates even though its Google license has expired.

Aug. 17, 2020: US tightens restrictions on Huawei’s access to American chips.

Aug. 13, 2020: India takes steps to lock Huawei and ZTE out of its 5G rollout.

July 30, 2020: Huawei takes Samsung’s crown to become world’s biggest phone maker, analyst says.

July 29, 2020: Qualcomm settles long-running Huawei patent spat.

July 20, 2020: China reportedly considers action against Nokia and Ericsson if EU bans Huawei.

July 15, 2020: Trump administration hits Huawei workers with US visa restrictions.

July 14, 2020: UK follows US in banning Huawei from its 5G network.

July 3, 2020: Huawei brings Uber rival Bolt to its AppGallery store.

June 30, 2020: Huawei and ZTE officially designated national security threats by FCC.

June 25, 2020: Trump administration designates Huawei as backed by Chinese military.

June 17, 2020: Huawei reveals which phones will get EMUI 10.1 update.

June 15, 2020: Commerce Department lets US companies work with Huawei on developing 5G standards.

June 10, 2020: NATO boss supports the UK’s review of Huawei’s role in its 5G rollout.

June 9, 2020: Huawei insists it “grew up in the UK” and wants to play a significant role in the country’s 5G deployment.

June 4, 2000: Documents reportedly reveal Huawei covered up ownership of Iranian affiliate in scheme to sell prohibited US tech.

June 3, 2000: Canadian telecoms effectively lock Huawei out of country’s 5G development.

June 2, 2020: US Senator Tom Cotton tells British politicians he thinks China is trying to use Huawei to “drive a hi-tech wedge between” America and the UK.

June 1, 2020: Huawei reportedly turns to rival chipmakers to weather US clampdown.

May 27, 2020: Huawei CFO loses case to dismiss extradition to the US.

May 26, 2020: UK launches fresh probe into Huawei’s role in future 5G plans. Huawei announces partnership with Youtube rival Dailymotion.

May 22, 2020: British Prime Minister Boris Johnson reportedly looks to reduce Huawei’s role in country’s 5G networks.

May 18, 2020: Huawei criticizes new US rules as “pernicious” and “arbitrary,” and China reportedly prepares to take “forceful countermeasures” against US tech companies.

May 15, 2020: Commerce Department tightens export controls on Huawei, and extends Temporary General License for another 90 days.

May 14, 2020: Trump extends executive order targeting Huawei for another year.

May 7, 2020: US rule might let American companies work with Huawei on 5G.

May 1, 2020: Huawei Australia’s carrier business drops 21% for 2019 as 5G ban bites.

April 29, 2020: Huawei reportedly expands partnership with European chipmaker in the face of increasing US restrictions on suppliers.

April 21, 2020: Huawei reports 1.4% revenue increase for the first quarter of 2020 as it grapples with the coronavirus pandemic. Also, senior British official reportedly says UK is unlikely to reconsider “firm” decision to allow Huawei access to non-sensitive parts of its 5G network.

April 20, 2020: Huawei founder Ren Zhengfei downplays his influence over the company in a South China Morning Post profile.

April 17, 2020: Chinese teaser video showcases Huawei’s Nova 7 phone series ahead April 23 reveal.

April 15, 2020: BT delays removal of Huawei equipment from EE’s core network by two years.

April 13, 2020: Huawei warns that disrupting its involvement in Britain’s 5G rollout would do the country “a disservice.”

April 2, 2020: Huawei signs non-aggression patent pact as it joins Open Invention Network.

March 31, 2020: Huawei reports smallest profit increase in three years as US ban takes its toll.

March 27, 2020: Huawei reportedly starts working on cloud gaming platform with Tencent, the biggest games company in the world.

March 26, 2020: Huawei reveals P40 Pro Plus, P40 Pro and P40, along with smart assistant Celia. Also, senior US officials reportedly agree on new rules to cut Huawei off from global chip suppliers.

Now playing:Watch this: Huawei unveils P40, P40 Pro and Pro Plus
10:57

March 24, 2020: Huawei P40 and P40 Pro apparently leak online ahead of launch.

March 12, 2020: Trump signs law to prevent US rural telecom carriers from using Huawei network equipment, and France is reportedly planning to allow some Huawei gear in its 5G network.

March 11, 2020: US officials reportedly postpone a meeting on potential new restrictions on sales of technology to Huawei and China, and the Commerce Department extends Huawei license through May 15.

March 9, 2020: Huawei cancels P40 launch event due to coronavirus, and US envoy reportedly presses Canada over Huawei role in 5G network.

March 6, 2020: Huawei reportedly projects major drop in phone sales amid US sanctions.

March 4, 2020: Nokia and Ericsson pitch themselves to US lawmakers as Huawei 5G alternative. Also, Huawei pleads not guilty to new US criminal charges in 2018 case and FCC’s Brendan Carr says US “cannot treat Huawei as anything other than a threat to our collective security.”

March 3, 2020: US senators urge UK to reconsider use of Huawei gear in its 5G network.

March 2, 2020: Leaked documents reportedly reveal Huawei’s role in shipping prohibited US gear to Iran.

Related story: Huawei P40 Pro specs, P40 Pro Plus and P40 vs. P30 Pro and Mate 30 Pro: What’s new and what’s different?

Feb. 28, 2020: Huawei will spend €200 million on new 5G plant in France.

Feb. 27, 2020: FCC starts collecting data on Huawei use in US networks, and Senate passes bill banning government purchases of Huawei gear.

Feb. 26, 2020: Officials from Huawei and Defense Department spar at cybersecurity panel.

Feb. 24, 2020: Huawei will launch its P40 Pro in Paris on March 26, its upgraded Mate XS foldable will be available outside China and the company is bringing a new tablet, speaker and green MateBook X Pro laptop to Europe. And Trump reportedly accuses British Prime Minister Boris Johnson of “betrayal” in a heated phone call about Huawei 5G decision.

Feb. 23, 2020: Google warns people against sideloading its apps on Huawei’s P40 phones.

Feb. 21, 2020: The White House reportedly is planning a 5G summit to combat Huawei.

Feb. 20, 2020: Huawei makes an aggressive 5G infrastructure product pitch to European nations.

Feb. 18, 2020: A judge dismisses a Huawei suit challenging the US government’s equipment ban.

Feb. 14, 2020: Huawei gets another 45-day reprieve from Commerce Department.

Feb. 13, 2020: The Justice Department charges Huawei with racketeering and theft of trade secrets.

Feb. 11, 2020: The US reportedly finds Huawei has backdoor access to mobile networks globally.

Feb. 7, 2020: Attorney General William Barr suggests that US take a “controlling stake” in Ericsson or Nokia to counter Huawei.

Feb, 6, 2020: Huawei hits Verizon with lawsuits alleging patent infringement, and it’ll reportedly join forces with Vivo and Oppo against Google Play Store.

Feb. 5, 2020: Vodafone says implementing UK and European Huawei restrictions could take five years.

Feb. 3, 2020: Huawei asks FCC to drop national “unlawful and misguided” security risk label, and updates its “ultralight” MateBook D laptops.

Jan. 30, 2020: Australian politicians dismiss talk of revisiting Huawei 5G ban.

Jan. 29, 2020: EU allows Huawei for 5G, but warns states to limit core network access.

Jan. 28, 2020: UK gives Huawei the green light to build the country’s non-core 5G network, with some limitations, while an analyst says Huawei is the world’s top 5G phone vendor.

Jan. 24, 2020: The Pentagon reportedly blocked even tighter rules on US companies selling to Huawei.

Jan. 23, 2020: Huawei postpones its China developers conference due to deadly coronavirus outbreak.

Jan. 20, 2020: Huawei will use TomTom’s navigation software and data after losing Google Maps.

Jan. 16, 2020: Huawei Mate XS foldable phone will reportedly be cheaper and smaller, while images of purported Huawei P40 Pro hint at many camera features.

Jan. 15, 2020: Huawei shipped nearly 7 million 5G phones last year, and it’s reportedly spending $26 million courting developers to build apps for its phones.

Jan. 14, 2020: The US presses British officials to block Huawei from its 5G network, and US senators propose over $1B in 5G subsidies to counter Huawei dominance.

Jan. 9, 2020: Sen. Tom Cotton unveils a bill to stop the US from sharing intelligence with countries that use Huawei 5G technology.

Jan. 7, 2020: Huawei is allowed to participate in India’s 5G trial phase.

Read more: China wants to dominate the most important tech of our time

2019

Dec. 31, 2019: Huawei boosted phone sales in 2019 but predicts a “difficult” 2020.

Dec. 26, 2019: Huawei rebuts suggestions that Chinese state support drove its growth.

Dec. 20, 2019: Huawei’s new P40 Pro rumored to have 10x optical zoom.

Dec. 19, 2019: Greenland opts for Sweden’s Ericsson over Huawei for 5G rollout.

Dec. 18, 2019: Huawei opens 5G innovation center in London.

Dec. 17, 2019: Huawei will launch the P40 Pro in March without Google support, and Spain’sTelefonica says it’ll drastically reduce Huawei gear use for its core 5G network.

Dec. 16, 2019: US House of Representatives passes bill barring government from buying Huawei gear.

Dec. 15, 2019: Norway’s Telenor says Huawei will still play a role in the country’s 5G rollout.

Dec. 13, 2019: Huawei CFO Meng Wanzhou wins court order to receive documents for her arrest and extradition.

Dec. 8, 2019: Huawei will bring Harmony OS to more products next year, but not phones.

Dec. 5, 2019: UK Prime Minister Boris Johnson takes selfie with Huawei phone after hinting at ban.

Dec. 4, 2019: Huawei slams FCC’s new restrictions as unconstitutional in legal challenge.

Dec. 3, 2019: Huawei cut US components out of Mate 30 in wake of Trump’s ban, and US judge disqualifies Huawei lawyer from fraud and sanctions case, citing conflict of interest.

Dec. 2, 2019: Huawei predicts Australia’s 5G ban will force it to cut 1,500 jobs.

Now playing:Watch this: What is going on between Huawei and the US?
4:59

Nov. 29, 2019: Huawei will apparently fight the FCC decision to exclude it from federal subsidies.

Nov. 26, 2019: Huawei and Samsung see jump in phone sales for third quarter, while others see decline.

Nov. 25, 2019: Huawei unveils its iPad Pro rival, the MatePad Pro, for China.

Nov. 22, 2019: The FCC bars Huawei and ZTE from billions in federal subsidies, while senators want Trump to halt licenses that let US companies sell to Huawei.

Nov. 21, 2019: Microsoft scores license to export software to Huawei.

Now playing:Watch this: Huawei P40 Pro and Plus first impressions: CNET editors…
5:24

Nov. 20, 2019: Huawei Mate X’s folding screen costs $1,000 to fix.

Nov. 19, 2019: Huawei says US license extension doesn’t change the fact that it’s being treated unfairly.

Nov. 12, 2019: Huawei is reportedly giving staff $286 million in bonuses for sticking through US ban.

Nov. 8, 2019: Trump’s tech chief slams countries for “opening their arms” to Huawei.

Nov. 7, 2019: Huawei founder says the company’s coping fine with the US trade ban, but stresses the need for open collaboration.

Nov. 5, 2019: Hungary will reportedly work with Huawei in building its 5G network.

Nov. 4, 2019: US Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross says licenses allowing US companies to sell equipment to Huawei “will be forthcoming very shortly.”

Nov. 1, 2019: Huawei might be working on an iPad Pro-style tablet.

Related story: Huawei Watch GT 2e gets a sporty look, new health features.

Oct. 31, 2019: The UK general election has apparently delayed the decision on giving Huawei access to the UK’s 5G network again. Also, Huawei ships 66.7 million phones in 2019’s third quarter.

Oct. 28, 2019: The Federal Communications Commission says it’ll cut off funding to wireless carriers using Huawei and ZTE equipment.

Huawei Mate X: Our best look yet at the foldable phoneSee all photos



+29 More

Oct. 23, 2019: Huawei launches the Mate X foldable phone in China and celebrates hitting 200 million phone shipments two months sooner than it did last year. Also, the company’s cybersecurity chief says it’d be easier to bribe telecom staff than build backdoors into networks.

Oct. 21, 2019: A Huawei executive acknowledges the company’s struggling without Google support.

Oct. 16, 2019: Huawei sold a whole bunch of phones despite the US ban, while a Mate X unboxing video hints at the foldable phone’s imminent release. Also, Germany caused an uproar with draft network security rules that would let Huawei work on its 5G networks.

Oct. 15, 2019: Huawei and Sunrise co-build a 5G research center in Switzerland.

Oct. 9, 2019: Trump is reportedly ready to approve sales of US goods to Huawei.

Oct. 4, 2019: Malaysian telecom Maxis signs up with Huawei for 5G.

Oct. 2, 2019: Huawei Mate 30 phones apparently lose backdoor access to Google apps.

Related story: Can Huawei Mate 30 Pro’s camera beat iPhone 11’s? These photos speak for themselves.

Sept. 30, 2019: Huawei opens flagship store in Shenzhen.

Sept. 26, 2019: Huawei apparently is making 5G base stations without US parts, and Norway says it won’t ban the company from its 5G rollout.

Sept. 19, 2019: Huawei unveils the Mate 30 Pro phone, Watch GT 2 and Vision TV during an event in Munich.

Sept. 18, 2019: Huawei urges Australia to embrace Chinese products during its “explosion of innovation,” and its Mate 30 event lineup apparently leaks a day early.

Sept. 12, 2019: Huawei’s founder is ready to sell his company’s 5G tech to a Western buyer. Separately, Huawei is selling MateBook laptops with Linux preinstalled in China.

Sept. 10, 2019: Huawei drops a lawsuit against the US government after its telecom equipment is returned.

Sept. 9, 2019: Microsoft President Brad Smith wants the US government to offer more evidence to back up its Huawei ban. Also, US prosecutors charge a Chinese professor with fraud for allegedly taking a California company’s tech for Huawei’s benefit.

Sept. 8, 2019: Huawei’s Mate X foldable phone could go on sale in October.

Sept. 6, 2019: Huawei skirts US ban with “new” P30 Pro, but only the colors are new. It also shows off the 5G Kirin 990 chip that’ll power its Mate 30.

Sept. 3, 2019: Huawei accuses US of using cyberattacks and threats to disrupt its business. It also intends to give universities $300 million annually despite the US trade ban.

Sept. 2, 2019: Huawei announces that the Mate 30 series launches Sept. 19.

Now playing:Watch this: Huawei shows off Bluetooth smart glasses
0:52

Aug 27, 2019: US reportedly receives more than 130 requests for Huawei licenses, but none have been issued yet. Also, new Huawei phones reportedly won’t be able to use Android.

Aug. 23, 2019: Huawei reckons the US ban will cost its phone division $10 billion, and sheds 100 Australian jobs after being banned from country’s 5G rollout.

Aug. 22, 2019: Huawei says it has no plans to launch a Harmony-powered phone.

Related story: HarmonyOS: What’s with Huawei’s Android-replacement operating system?

Aug. 19, 2019: US Commerce Department extends reprieve allowing companies to work with Huawei.

Aug. 18, 2019: Trump says he doesn’t want to do business with Huawei due to the “national security threat” it represents.

Aug. 16, 2019: Huawei’s founder expresses confidence that UK “won’t say no to us” in its 5G rollout.

Aug. 15, 2019: Huawei pushes back the launch of its Mate X again, and might be working on its own version of Google Maps.

Aug. 14, 2019: Huawei is apparently researching 6G wireless internet connectivity.

Aug. 13, 2019: India remains undecided on letting Huawei sell its 5G networking equipment in the country.

Aug. 9, 2019: Huawei unveils its Android replacement “Harmony,” while Trump says the US won’t do business with Huawei.

Aug. 7, 2019: Trump administration says it’ll ban government from doing business with Huawei, and Republican senators target Google over Huawei project.

Aug. 6, 2019: Huawei Twitter poll reveals its followers think it’s owned by the Chinese government, but people on Facebook disagree.

Aug. 4, 2019: Huawei will reportedly release a cheap phone powered by its Hongmeng OS in late 2019.

July 31, 2019: Huawei beat iPhone with 17% global market share in 2019’s second quarter, research firm said.

July 30, 2019: Huawei reported revenue surge despite US ban, and Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross said Trump administration could decide on licenses allowing Huawei sales by next week.

July 29, 2019: Huawei and Google were reportedly working on a smart speaker before ban.

July 26, 2019: Chinese authorities suspect FedEx illegally held back over 100 Huawei packages, report said.

July 25, 2019: Electronics company reportedly “seized” $100M of Huawei goods following US ban.

July 24, 2019: United Arab Emirates telecom says US ban on Huawei isn’t an issue for its 5G network.

July 23, 2019: Huawei lays off more than 600 US workers due to blacklisting.

July 22, 2019: Leaked documents suggested that Huawei secretly helped build North Korea’s wireless network. Also, the White House gathering tech execs for a meeting where Trump reportedly said Huawei licensing deals will be “timely.”

July 19, 2019: Huawei says Hongmeng OS isn’t designed as an Android replacement.

July 16, 2019: Bipartisan group of senators introduces 5G legislation that would keep Huawei blacklisted.

July 15, 2019: Canada may wait until after October elections to decide on Huawei ban, while the US will reportedly let Huawei sell to companies within weeks. Also, Huawei reportedly plans major layoffs at its US research labs.

July 9, 2019: US will allow licensed sales to Huawei, but it remains blacklisted.

July 7, 2019: Huawei CEO says its HongMeng OS alternative is ‘likely’ faster than Android, but needs its own app store.

July 4, 2019: US government tries to get Huawei lawsuit thrown out.

July 3, 2019: Huawei remains on Commerce Department’s blacklist despite Trump’s latest decision.

July 2, 2019: Huawei reportedly isn’t sure about using Android in future phones.

July 1, 2019: Trump official says eased Huawei restrictions only apply to widely available products.

June 29, 2019: Trump decides to lift some restrictions on US companies selling to Huawei.

June 27, 2019: Huawei employees worked on Chinese military research projects, according to a report from Bloomberg.

June 25, 2019: US companies are reportedly bypassing the Trump ban on sales to Huawei, while FedEx is suing the Commerce Department over the diversion of Huawei packages.

June 24, 2019: Huawei says it’ll increase its 5G investment in spite of US ban, while attorneys for its imprisoned CFO have asked for the US extradition request to be withdrawn. Also, an FCC commissioner wants Huawei gear out of US networks, and the Trump administration reportedly is thinking about requiring domestic 5G equipment to be made outside China.

June 21, 2019: Huawei unveils a trio of new Nova 5 phones in China as US tensions simmer, and its Mate X foldable phone will reportedly launch by September. The US also blacklists five more Chinese tech companies.

June 19, 2019: Huawei’s CEO isn’t worried about $30 billion revenue hit from US ban.

June 18, 2019: Huawei boss predicts $30B revenue hit from US ban, but Microsoft starts selling its laptops again.

June 13, 2019: Chinese ambassador warns Britain that excluding Huawei from 5G sends a “bad signal.”

June 12, 2019: Huawei reportedly moves to trademark its own OS, and apparently chases Verizon for $1B in patent licensing fees.

June 11, 2019: Huawei says it’ll need more time to become world’s biggest phone seller and reportedly delays announcement of its new laptop indefinitely.

June 10, 2019: Huawei reportedly asks app developers to publish on its AppGallery store, and a White House official apparently wants to delay the US government’s Huawei ban.

June 7, 2019: Facebook stops letting Huawei preinstall its apps, and Google reportedly warns the Trump administration that its Huawei ban creates a national security risk. Also, Huawei CFO Meng Wanzhou’s extradition hearing is set for January 2020.

June 6, 2019: Russian telecom agrees to let Huawei develop country’s 5G network, while China gives Huawei a boost by issuing 5G licenses.

June 5, 2019: Huawei chairman says company would sign a “no-spy” deal with US.

June 4, 2019: Huawei trade secrets trial reportedly kicks off in Texas.

June 3, 2019: Science publisher IEEE reverses its week-old ban on Huawei scientists reviewing technical papers.

June 2, 2019: Huawei reportedly strips back production of phones amid US crackdown.

Honor 9X is the last Huawei phone to use AndroidSee all photos



+7 More

May 31, 2019: Huawei reportedly orders employees to cancel US meetings, mirrors Consumer Technology Association’s criticism of Trump’s plans to impose higher tariffs on imported Mexican goods.

May 30, 2019: Huawei membership restored by SD Association and Wi-Fi Alliance, while it quietly launches its 5G lab in the shadow of the US ban. Also, its wearables shipments quadruple in first quarter.

May 29, 2019: Huawei asks court to rule US ban unconstitutional.

May 28, 2019: Huawei reportedly plans to bring OS to China later this year, internationally in 2020.

May 26, 2019: Huawei’s founder says he’d “be the first to protest” if China retaliated against Apple.

May 24, 2019: Huawei’s operating system may be called “Hongmeng,” while Amazon Japan reportedly stops selling its devices.

May 23, 2019: US reportedly accuses Huawei of lying about Chinese ties.

May 22, 2019: Chip designer Arm ditches Huawei, while Mate 20 X gets dropped from UK 5G launch.

May 21, 2019: Huawei reportedly wants its app store to compete with Google’s.

May 20, 2019: Huawei gets a temporary reprieve from the US trade ban, prompting Google to revive work temporarily.

May 19, 2019: Google cuts off Huawei phones from future Android updates.

May 16, 2019: Huawei says US ban will ‘significantly harm’ American jobs and companies.

May 15, 2019: Trump effectively bans Huawei with a national security order.

May 8, 2019: 5G rollout may face a delay in UK over Huawei investigations.

May 3, 2019: Countries draft 5G security proposals as the US warns again of Huawei’s threat.

May 2, 2019: A Huawei leak prompts the sacking of UK defense minister Gavin Williamson.

May 1, 2019: Huawei hits 50% growth in phone sales and reportedly has an 8K 5G TV in the works for later this year.

April 30, 2019: Vodafone found hidden backdoors in Huawei equipment, according to a report.

April 24, 2019: Britain will reportedly allow Huawei limited access to 5G infrastructure. Several days later, China pushes Britain to let Huawei be part of 5G rollout.

April 21, 2019: The CIA reportedly says Huawei is funded by Chinese state security.

April 11, 2019: Google and Huawei will pay Nexus 6P owners for bootloop issues in class-action lawsuit.

April 9, 2019: The US reportedly no longer demands a Huawei ban in Germany.

April 8, 2019: Huawei is “open” to selling its 5G chips to Apple, says report.

April 4, 2019: Huawei sets new goals to overtake Samsung and Apple, and MIT severs links with Huawei and ZTE due to US investigations.

Mate X foldable phone: Here’s what it’s really like to useSee all photos



+33 More

March 29, 2019: Huawei slams US for having “a loser’s attitude” because its tech can’t compete.

March 28, 2019: British watchdog warns that Huawei products represent “significantly increased risk.”

March 26, 2019: Huawei launches the P30 and P30 Pro in Paris.

March 19, 2019: Angela Merkel pushes back against US pressure to bar Huawei from Germany’s 5G rollout.

March 15, 2019: Huawei’s CFO wanted to quit before arrest, according to the company’s founder.

March 14, 2019: Huawei is developing its own OS in case it can’t use Android or Windows, report says.

March 12, 2019: US reportedly tells Germany to drop Huawei or it’ll limit intelligence sharing. The Huawei Mate 20 hits 10 million shipped.

March 8, 2019: Huawei sues the US government over its equipment ban.

March 5, 2019: Huawei reportedly calls for international cybersecurity standards.

March 1, 2019: An extradition hearing for Huawei’s CFO gets the go-ahead from Canada, and the US warns the Philippines against using Huawei 5G gear.

Now playing:Watch this: Huawei shows off new laptop, speaker and tablet for Europe
1:57

Feb. 28, 2019: Chinese kids literally sing Huawei’s praises in surreal video.

Feb. 26, 2019: Samsung and Huawei settle 2-year-old patent dispute.

Feb. 25, 2019: Huawei could face a solar tech ban in the US.

Feb. 24, 2019: Huawei unveils the Mate X foldable phone.

Feb. 22, 2019: Italian politicians reportedly push for Huawei 5G ban.

Feb. 21, 2019: Secretary of State Mike Pompeo says countries using Huawei tech pose a risk to the US.

Feb. 20-21, 2019: Ren Zhengfei says that the arrest of his daughter, the company’s CFO, was “politically motivated and that the US treats 5G like “military” tech.

Feb. 19, 2019: Ren tells the BBC “there’s no way the US can crush us.”

Feb. 17, 2019: The UK reportedly concludes that using Huawei in 5G is a manageable risk.

Feb. 6, 2019: US State Department discourages European countries from using Huawei equipment in their 5G rollouts.

Feb. 4, 2019: A report says the FBI raided a Huawei lab and set up a CES sting. Also, two of the company’s staff were expelled from Denmark after a work permit inspection.

The charges unsealed today clearly allege that Huawei intentionally conspired to steal the intellectual property of an American company.
FBI Director Christopher Wray, Jan. 29, 2019

Jan. 30, 2019: Qualcomm reaches an interim licensing agreement with Huawei.

Jan. 29, 2019: US hammers Huawei with 23 indictments for alleged trade secret theft and fraud.

Jan. 25, 2019: Colleges reportedly drop Huawei equipment to appease the Trump administration. Also, Huawei says it’ll reveal a foldable phone with 5G in February.

Jan. 24, 2019: Huawei reportedly says it’ll take the smartphone crown from Samsung by 2020.

Jan. 23, 2019: Huawei’s CFO may face formal extradition to the US, report says.

Jan. 18, 2019: China says a Canadian ban on Huawei’s 5G tech will trigger “repercussions.”

Jan. 11, 2019: In Poland, a Huawei employee gets arrested over alleged spying.Three days later, Huawei sacks that employee.

Jan. 8, 2019: Huawei fights to stay in the US with laptops and tablets at CES.

Jan. 4, 2019: Senators introduce a bipartisan bill to address concerns about Chinese tech companies.

Jan. 3, 2019: A report suggests that President Trump may use an executive order to ban Huawei and ZTE purchases.

Read: Huawei could survive without Android, but not very well

2018

Dec. 24, 2018: Huawei exceeds 200 million smartphone shipments.

Dec. 12, 2018: A Canadian court grants Huawei’s CFO $10 million bail.

Dec. 7, 2018: Reuters reports that Japan will stop buying Huawei, ZTE equipment.

Dec. 6, 2018: Huawei CFO Meng Wanzhou is arrested in Canada at the request of the US.

Dec. 5, 2018: Britain’s BT says it’ll strip Huawei equipment from 4G network by 2021 and won’t use it in 5G core.

Oct. 18, 2018: Huawei tussles with US startup CNEX Labs over theft of technology.

Huawei P30 Pro’s camera put to the test in ParisSee all photos



+21 More

Sept. 7, 2018: Huawei gets caught cheating on a phone benchmark test.

Sept. 5, 2018: In a Senate hearing on Facebook and Twitter, Huawei and ZTE get called out.

Aug. 1, 2018: Knocking off Apple, Huawei becomes the No. 2 phone seller.

July 19, 2018: Huawei crosses 100 million shipments mark for the year to date.

July 11, 2018: Australia says it’ll ban Huawei from 5G rollout amid security concerns.

June 7, 2018: Congress calls out Google over its ties with Huawei.

June 6, 2018: A report reveals that Facebook gave Huawei special access to user data.

May 2, 2018: The Pentagon bans the sale of Huawei and ZTE phones on US military bases.

March 22, 2018: Huawei loses Best Buy as retail partner.

Feb. 13, 2018: FBI Director Chris Wray warns against buying Huawei and ZTE phones.

Jan. 9, 2018: At CES, Huawei CEO Richard Yu addresses the loss of AT&T support.

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Starlink explained: What to know about Elon Musk’s satellite internet venture – CNET

When you think of billionaire entrepreneur Elon Musk, chances are good that you think of his electric car company Tesla or his space-exploration venture SpaceX (to say nothing of his history of stirring up controversy on social media, or smoking weed with Joe Rogan). Maybe you just know him as the second-richest person on Earth (Jeff Bezos retook the top spot earlier this year).

Before long, though, something else might come to mind when you think of Musk: a venture called Starlink that seeks to sell internet connections to almost anyone on the planet by way of a growing network of private satellites orbiting overhead.

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After years of development within SpaceX — and after securing nearly $885.5 million in grant funds from the Federal Communications Commission at the end of 2020 — Starlink’s progress seems to be accelerating in 2021. In January, after about three years’ worth of successful launches, the project surpassed 1,000 satellites delivered into orbit. Earlier in February, Musk’s company disclosed that Starlink now serves more than 10,000 customers. Now, the service is in the process of expanding preorders to even more potential customers, with people currently living without access to high-speed internet as one of the top priorities.

All of that makes Starlink well worth keeping an eye on in 2021. For now, here’s everything you should know about it.

Now playing:Watch this: Testing out SpaceX Starlink satellite internet
12:32
OK, start at the beginning — what is Starlink, exactly?

Technically a division within SpaceX, Starlink is also the name of the spaceflight company’s growing network — or “constellation” — of orbital satellites. The development of that network began in 2015, with the first prototype satellites launched into orbit in 2018.

In the years since, SpaceX has deployed over 1,000 Starlink satellites into orbit across more than 20 successful launches. In January, for its first Starlink mission of 2021, SpaceX launched 60 satellites into orbit from Kennedy Space Center using the landable, relaunchable Falcon 9 orbital rocket. Subsequent launches, including four more in February, have brought the total number of satellites launched up to nearly 1,300.

And those satellites can connect my home to the internet?

That’s the idea, yes.

Just like existing providers of satellite internet like HughesNet or ViaSat, Starlink wants to sell internet access — particularly to people in rural areas and other parts of the world who don’t already have access to high-speed broadband.

“Starlink is ideally suited for areas of the globe where connectivity has typically been a challenge,” the Starlink website reads. “Unbounded by traditional ground infrastructure, Starlink can deliver high-speed broadband internet to locations where access has been unreliable or completely unavailable.”

All you need to do to make the connection is set up a small satellite dish at your home to receive the signal and pass the bandwidth on to your router. Starlink offers an app for Android and iOS that uses augmented reality to help customers pick the best location and position for their receivers.

Starlink’s service is only available in select regions at this point, but the service now boasts more than 10,000 customers, and the coverage map will continue to grow as more satellites make their way into the constellation. Eventually, Starlink hopes to blanket the entire planet in a usable high-speed Wi-Fi signal.

How fast is Starlink’s internet service?

“Users can expect to see data speeds vary from 50 to 150 megabits per second and latency from 20 to 40 milliseconds in most locations over the next several months,” Starlink’s website says, while also warning of brief periods of no connectivity at all. “As we launch more satellites, install more ground stations and improve our networking software, data speed, latency and uptime will improve dramatically.”

To that end, Musk tweeted in February that he expects the service to double its top speeds to 300Mbps by the end of 2021.

What does Starlink cost?

Starlink has begun accepting preorders from customers interested in joining the company’s “Better Than Nothing” beta program. The cost of the service is billed at $99 per month, plus taxes and fees, plus an initial payment of $499 for the mountable satellite dish and router that you’ll need to install at home.

Starlink says that it’s taking orders from customers on a first-come, first-served basis and that some preorders could take as long as six months to fulfill.

Where is Starlink available?

For now, service is limited to the northwest US, adjacent parts of Canada, parts of the UK and select other areas, but the coverage map will grow considerably as more satellites join the constellation. There’s still a ways to go — Starlink will likely need at least 10,000 satellites in orbit before it can claim to cover a majority of the globe (and SpaceX has shown signs that it wants as many as 30,000 satellites in the constellation). Right now, it’s only about 10% of the way there at best, with coverage focused on regions sitting between 45 and 53 degrees North latitude.

Musk has told customers that he expects the service to hit worldwide availability in 2022, but that will be contingent on a steady streak of successful launches.

Why satellites, anyway? Isn’t fiber faster?

Fiber, or internet delivered via ground-laid fiber-optic cable, offers upload and download speeds that are indeed much faster than satellite internet — but, as companies like Google will tell you, there’s nothing fast about deploying the infrastructure necessary to get fiber to people’s homes. That’s not to say that there’s anything simple about shooting satellites into space, but with fewer sharp-elbowed competitors — and with a lot less red tape to cut through — there’s every reason to believe that services like Starlink will reach the bulk of underserved communities long before fiber ever will. Recent FCC filings also suggest that Starlink could ultimately double as a dedicated phone service, too.

And don’t forget that this is Elon Musk we’re talking about. SpaceX is the only company on the planet with a landable, reusable rocket capable of delivering payload after payload into orbit. That’s a mighty advantage in the commercial space race. On top of that, Musk said in 2018 that Starlink will help provide SpaceX with revenue needed to fund the company’s long-held ambition to establish a base on Mars.

If that day arrives, it’s also likely that SpaceX will try to establish a satellite constellation on the red planet, too. That means that Starlink customers are potentially doubling as guinea pigs for the Martian wireless networks of the future.

“If you send a million people to Mars, you better provide some way for them to communicate,” said SpaceX President Gwynne Shotwell in 2016, speaking about the company’s long-term vision for Starlink. “I don’t think the people who go to Mars are going to be satisfied with some terrible, old-fashioned radios. They’ll want their iPhones or Androids on Mars.”

As CNET’s Jesse Orral noted in a recent video about Starlink, you’ll even find hints of Musk’s plans for Mars in the Starlink terms of service, which at one point reads:

“For services provided on Mars, or in transit to Mars via Starship or other colonization spacecraft, the parties recognize Mars as a free planet and that no Earth-based government has authority or sovereignty over Martian activities.”

Still, with top speeds currently pegged at 150Mbps, Starlink’s satellite internet won’t be anywhere near the gigabit fiber speeds people on Earth are used to anytime soon — and that’s due to the sheer distance each transmission needs to travel on its round trip from your home to the stratosphere. It’s a factor that also jacks up latency, which is why you’ll often notice awkward lulls in the conversation if you’re talking to someone over a satellite connection.

That said, Starlink promises to improve upon existing expectations for satellite connections by placing satellites into orbit at lower altitudes than before — 60 times closer to the Earth’s surface than traditional satellites, per the company’s claims. This low-earth orbit approach means that there’s less distance for those Starlink signals to travel — and thus, less latency. We’ll let you know how those claims hold up once we’re able to test the Starlink network out for ourselves.

What about bad weather and other obstructions?

That’s definitely one of the downsides to satellite internet. Per Starlink’s FAQ, the receiver is capable of melting snow that lands on it, but it can’t do anything about surrounding snow build-up and other obstructions that might block its line of sight to the satellite.

“We recommend installing Starlink in a location that avoids snow build-up and other obstructions from blocking the field of view,” the FAQ reads. “Heavy rain or wind can also affect your satellite internet connection, potentially leading to slower speeds or a rare outage.”

Are there any other issues with Starlink’s satellites?

There’s plenty of concern about the proliferation of privately owned satellites in space, and controversy in astronomical circles about the impact low-orbiting satellites have on the night sky itself.

In 2019, shortly after the deployment of Starlink’s first broadband satellites, the International Astronomical Union released an alarm-sounding statement warning of unforeseen consequences for stargazing and for the protection of nocturnal wildlife.

“We do not yet understand the impact of thousands of these visible satellites scattered across the night sky and despite their good intentions, these satellite constellations may threaten both,” the statement reads.

Since then, Starlink has begun testing a variety of new designs intended to reduce the brightness and visibility of its satellites. At the start of 2020, the company tested a “DarkSat” satellite that included a special, nonreflective coating. Later, in June of 2020, the company launched a “VisorSat” satellite that features a special sunshade visor. In August, Starlink launched another batch of satellites — this time, all of them were equipped with visors.

“We want to make sure we do the right thing to make sure little kids can look through their telescope,” Shotwell said. “It’s cool for them to see a Starlink. But they should be looking at Saturn, at the moon … and not want to be interrupted.”

“The Starlink teams have worked closely with leading astronomers around the world to better understand the specifics of their observations and engineering changes we can make to reduce satellite brightness,” the company website reads.

OK. Where can I learn more about Starlink?

We’ll continue to cover Starlink’s progress from a variety of angles here on CNET, so stay tuned. You should also be sure to read Eric Mack’s excellent profile of Starlink — among other issues, it takes a close look at the project’s goals and challenges, as well as the implications for underserved internet consumers, and for astronomers concerned with light pollution obstructing views in the night sky.

Beyond that, we expect to begin testing Starlink’s network for ourselves at some point later this year. When we know more about how the satellite service stacks up as an internet provider, we’ll tell you all about it.

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HughesNet, Viasat and… Elon Musk? Satellite internet, explained – CNET

Satellite internet is nothing new, but there’s growing interest in the category now that Amazon, Elon Musk and others are working to expand its availability and capabilities. That’s welcome news, especially with the ongoing pandemic keeping people at home, and more dependent on internet access than ever before.

Satellite internet is nothing new, but there’s growing interest in the category now that Amazon, Elon Musk and others are working to expand its availability and capabilities. That’s welcome news, especially with the ongoing pandemic keeping people at home, and more dependent on internet access than ever before.

Available in all 50 states, satellite internet isn’t as fast as fiber or cable, but it might be one of your only options if you live in a rural part of the country, where internet infrastructure remains woefully underdeveloped. Here’s everything you should know about it before you sign up.

Read more: The best internet providers for 2021: Cable vs. DSL vs. satellite and more

How does satellite internet work?

Satellite internet works similarly to satellite TV, in that it relies on the combination of a signal routed through a satellite in low- or high-Earth orbit and a receiver dish that receives that signal. The receiver is typically placed on your home or business in a spot where it has as unobstructed access to the sky as possible. You’ll connect a modem to that satellite to translate the signal into a workable internet connection.

While electricity is needed, the satellite internet world isn’t dependent on cable wires, fiber or phone lines. These ground-based technologies are expensive to extend into rural areas, where companies get fewer customers for their investment in a given amount of cable. Satellites are difficult to launch into space, sure, but once a sufficient network of them is available, companies can offer broadband satellite internet to customers over a wide swath of the planet, even in fairly remote places.

Now playing:Watch this: Testing out SpaceX Starlink satellite internet
12:32
Who currently offers satellite internet?

The two top satellite internet providers in the country are Viasat and HughesNet, and each has been in the business of satellite-based communications for decades. Most recently, HughesNet began offering its Gen5 service plan for satellite-based home internet. Meanwhile, Viasat has started offering a new satellite/DSL hybrid service called Viasat Flex, which promises to improve signal reliability and lower latency. It’s available at no immediate extra cost in rural areas within AT&T’s DSL network.

Those two long-established names now face the prospect of fresh, high-profile competition. In July last year, the Federal Communications Commission granted approval for Amazon’s Project Kuiper to deploy thousands of satellites to create its own satellite-based broadband service under the Amazon umbrella. Even farther along is Elon Musk, CEO of SpaceX. His company’s Starlink satellite internet service already boasts more than a thousand satellites in orbit, and the service is currently in open beta in select regions with over 10,000 customers. You can check out our first impressions of Starlink in the video above.

Where is satellite internet available?

Most areas of the US can receive satellite internet signal due to the proliferation of satellites attuned to those latitudes. HughesNet, for instance, offers service in all 50 states. Some satellite internet companies are also exploring coverage in other parts of the world, including options for communities to have one or more community hot spots in lieu of residential dishes and connections.

Is satellite better than other kinds of internet?

Recent advancements and a proliferation of satellites in orbit have brought satellite internet into the range of speeds that are available from some of the other common modes of internet. If you aren’t sure what your current internet speed is, you can check your connection to put the various numbers in context; the connection is measured in megabits per second, or Mbps.

For instance, DSL and cable internet are very common, with DSL download speeds in the range of 3 to 50Mbps and cable typically providing anywhere from 10 to 500Mbps, depending on your plan and other factors. Satellite internet generally comes in at 12 to 100Mbps, which is slower, but Musk promises that speeds of up to 300Mbps will be possible when Starlink’s infrastructure is complete.

Fiber internet, which makes use of fiber-optic cable, can offer blazing fast download speeds as high as 2,000Mbps or 2 gigabits per second. Installing fiber cable is expensive, however, and some areas with very low population density may not become priority locations for fiber internet until long after satellite internet options grow.

Here’s a quick rundown of the pros and cons of a satellite connection as compared to other kinds of internet connections.

Pros Waiting for broadband internet to be provided in your area could take a long time, and satellite internet is available now.Satellite internet is fairly simple to acquire: find a company that offers it, request that a dish be installed and get the right plan for your needs. That’s it.Because major companies like SpaceX and Amazon are entering the satellite internet market, speeds are likely to increase and prices could become more competitive; at the very least, availability is likely to widen.
Cons When other options besides satellite internet are available and offer you reasonable broadband download and upload speeds, they will often be cheaper than satellite internet, at least for now.With many of the satellites located in far-away orbit above Earth, latency is a common issue with satellite internet, as your traffic will need a few extra moments to make it up to outer space. Starlink claims to be deploying its satellites much closer to Earth, which it hopes will resolve some latency issues.Satellite dishes must be aligned well, for instance with a “clear view of the Southern sky,” as HughesNet says. Snow buildup or certain kinds of weather can create spottiness or even an outage.
More on satellite internet

Want to learn more about the latest in satellite internet? Things are changing rapidly, so keep up with the news here at CNET: Learn about the best internet providers for 2021, Starlink reaching the 10,000-customer mark, and how the network of satellites is intended to envelop Earth long-term.

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The best rural internet providers of 2021 – CNET

Living in a rural or suburban area has its advantages, but one potential downside is a lack of internet options. For some, broadband service may not be available at all.

Living in a rural or suburban area has its advantages, but one potential downside is a lack of internet options. For some, broadband service may not be available at all. But the FCC and internet service providers are looking to change that and close the digital divide by expanding broadband connections to many rural areas that have long gone underserved.

Satellite internet has historically been the go-to option for broadband service in rural areas, and in many parts, it still is. But other connection types, such as DSL, fixed wireless, cable internet and fiber optic service have become more widely available over the years. That means that those living in rural areas may not have to continue settling for satellite service.

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If you’re shopping for internet service in a rural area, it’s important to know your options, however limited they may be, to ensure you’re getting the best provider for your needs. To help you narrow down your potential choices, we’ve listed our picks for the best rural internet providers below. The featured providers were chosen based on factors including availability, pricing, data caps and customer satisfaction.

Rise Broadband

Best rural ISP overall
Rise BroadbandConnection type: Fixed wirelessPrice range: $35-$70/mo.Speed range: 5-50MbpsData cap: 250GB, unlimited data options available

Rise Broadband is a leading fixed wireless internet provider with service available to around 7% of US households, many of which are in rural areas. Coverage spans 16 states, with Colorado, Idaho, Iowa, Illinois, Nebraska, Texas and Utah having the highest serviceability.

Similar to satellite internet, fixed wireless service from Rise Broadband requires no direct lines to the home, making it accessible to those in rural areas where cable, fiber optic and even telephone lines do not reach. Unlike some satellite internet plans, however, Rise Broadband offers speeds up to 50Mbps, latency low enough to support online gaming and truly unlimited data options, all at relatively low pricing.

Rise Broadband is also a great choice for wireless internet in rural areas with Premium Wi-Fi and Premium Mesh Wi-Fi service available as add-ons to all internet plans.

Mediacom

Cheapest rural internet provider
MediacomConnection type: CablePrice range: $20-$80/mo.Speed range: 60-1,000MbpsData cap: 60-6,000GB

As a cable provider, Mediacom can deliver much faster speeds than DSL, satellite or fixed wireless service, but the service reach is more limited. Mediacom is available to just over 2% of US residents with service areas across much of the Midwest and South as well as parts of California and Delaware.

Still, if it’s available in your area, Mediacom is one of the best cheap internet providers, with service starting at just $20 a month. Just know that the cheapest Mediacom plan only comes with 60GB of data, and going over the limit can add up to $50 to your bill. More data is available with higher-tiered plans, up to 6,000GB, but no Mediacom plan offers unlimited rural internet service.

Suddenlink

Best rural internet speeds for the price
Suddenlink CommunicationsConnection type: CablePrice range: $30-$70/mo.Speed range: 200-940MbpsData cap: 350GB, unlimited data available

A division of Altice, Suddenlink offers cable internet service throughout rural regions of Arizona, Arkansas, Louisiana, Missouri, North Carolina, Texas and West Virginia, among others.

While not the outright cheapest rural internet provider, the speeds you get for the price with Suddenlink will rival any major provider.

At $30 a month for up to 200Mbps, the cost per Mbps on Suddenlink’s lowest-priced plans is around 15 cents, whereas Mediacom’s lowest-priced plan has a cost per Mbps of around 33 cents. Suddenlink customers will also appreciate the higher data allowance of 350 GB that comes with Suddenlink’s 200Mbps plan.

Kinetic by Windstream

Best high-speed rural internet provider
WindstreamConnection type: DSL, fiber opticPrice range: $37-$67/mo.Speed range: 25-1,000MbpsData cap: None

Kinetic offers internet service in 18 states total across the Midwest, South and Eastern US. Though available primarily in rural and suburban areas, around a fifth of Windstream’s network uses fiber technology.

Where fiber service is available, Kinetic customers can get download and upload speeds ranging from 25Mbps to up to 1,000 Mbps, which is among the fastest speeds available from any major rural internet provider. These speeds make Kinetic ideal for streaming over wireless connections and online gaming, activities that are often a challenge with rural internet service.

Service areas not eligible for fiber service are likely to still have access to broadband-level speeds, as download speeds of 100 Mbps or higher are available throughout more than half of the provider’s DSL network. Regardless of the available network, Kinetic is a great choice for unlimited rural internet service, as all plans come with no data caps or contracts.

Viasat

Best satellite provider
ViasatConnection type: SatellitePrice range: $50-$150/mo.Speed range: 12-100MbpsData cap: 40-150GB (no hard data cap)

Satellite internet is the only internet connection type available throughout all 50 states. Elon Musk’s Starlink and Amazon’s Project Kuiper have injected a lot of interest into the category, and consumers should keep an eye on names like those in the coming years. That said, in areas where satellite internet is the only practical broadband option, residents will likely have their choice of Viasat or HughesNet.

Plan pricing is about the same with both providers, but Viasat plans come with more data and, in some locations, more speed, as well, with up to 100Mbps available in select areas. Additionally, Wi-Fi equipment rental is $5 a month cheaper than HughesNet, making Viasat one of the more affordable wireless internet providers.

Viasat also offers a new satellite/DSL hybrid service, Viasat Flex, intended to improve signal reliability and lower latency, two common pain points of satellite internet. The service is currently available at no immediate extra cost in rural areas within AT&T’s DSL network.

HughesNet

Best speed reliability
HughesNetConnection type: SatellitePrice range: $60-$150/mo.Speed range: 25MbpsData cap: 10-50GB (no hard data cap)

Viasat’s speeds can vary by location, but HughesNet’s max download speeds of 25Mbps are available across all service areas. What’s more, HughesNet customers are likely to actually get those speeds or higher when using a wired connection, according to the FCC’s Measuring Broadband in America, Eighth Report. In the report, HughesNet outperformed all other participating ISPs in terms of actual vs. advertised speeds, with actual median speeds coming in at 150% or higher of the advertised speed.

HughesNet customers are likely to run into speed issues if they exceed the monthly data cap, however. HughesNet does not charge overage fees, meaning the service is technically “unlimited,” but customers who go over their monthly data allowance will have to purchase more data or endure drastically reduced speeds for the remainder of their billing cycle.

CenturyLink

Best customer satisfaction of rural ISPs
Robert Alexander/Getty ImagesConnection type: DSL, fiber opticPrice range: $49-$65/mo.Speed range: 1-940 MbpsData cap: None

The most recent American Customer Satisfaction Index (ACSI) report ranked CenturyLink higher than other top rural internet providers. While CenturyLink’s score of 63/100 was not the highest of all ISPs, it does place above Windstream (61), Mediacom (59), Suddenlink (57) and Frontier (55).

With the exception of California and much of the Northeast, CenturyLink offers service in select areas across the country and is available to more than 16% of US residents. Those in rural areas serviceable for CenturyLink will likely only have access to DSL service, which can offer max speeds of anywhere from 1-100 Mbps. CenturyLink DSL plans up to 100 Mbps come with a price for life guarantee, unlimited data and no contract requirements.

Top rural ISP honorable mentions

These providers are also popular choices for internet service in rural areas but lack the speed, value or customer satisfaction marks to have made our list of the best.

Frontier: Frontier DSL serves select rural areas in 25 states, but speeds are inconsistent and likely to not reach broadband speeds in most areas. Plans start at $38 a month and include unlimited data and equipment rental at no extra cost.EarthLink: EarthLink employs existing networks from providers including AT&T, CenturyLink and Verizon to deliver service, meaning speeds, connection quality and pricing can vary widely by location. Pricing typically starts around $45 a month for up to 25Mbps in most service areas.AT&T Fixed Wireless: Fixed wireless service makes up about 7% of AT&T’s internet network. Where available, customers can get download speeds up to 25Mbps and 350GB data for around $60 a month.Verizon LTE Installed: Another fixed wireless service, Verizon LTE Installed makes use of Verizon’s 4G network and can deliver speeds typically around 25Mbps starting at $40 a month for Verizon mobile customers.

Why aren’t there more rural internet options available?

Installation and operation costs are the main factors preventing ISPs from expanding their networks into rural or suburban markets with low population density.

Satellite and fixed wireless services are common in rural areas because providers can broadcast internet signals over a large area without having to run physical cables to each address. DSL service is also common since the technology largely makes use of existing phone lines, which are readily available in many rural areas.

Coaxial (traditional “cable”) and fiber optic lines, unfortunately, are less accessible in rural areas as the cost of installing lines is often much more than the provider will get in return. This means major cable internet providers like Cox, Spectrum and Xfinity, as well as fiber providers such as AT&T, Google Fiber and Verizon, are less inclined to expand service into rural areas.

Will internet service in rural areas get any better?

The pandemic shed a new light on the digital divide, sparking initiatives by the FCC and some of the top ISPs to bring better broadband availability to previously underserved areas, so there is definitely hope.

It’s doubtful that cable or fiber providers will significantly expand into rural areas, but emerging 5G and satellite technologies could help close the digital divide in coming years. While AT&T, T-Mobile and Verizon are actively deploying 5G service across the US, Elon Musk and his satellite service, Starlink are ramping up to completely disrupt the satellite internet market. Stay tuned for updates regarding these technologies and others that could have an impact on your home internet service, rural or otherwise.

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Plume stellt WorkPass für kleine Unternehmen vor

Smart-Workplace-Suite hilft kleinen Unternehmen, ihre Büros und Ladengeschäfte intelligent zu verwalten und neue Erkenntnisse über die Bedürfnisse der Kunden zu gewinnen

PALO ALTO, Calif., 31. März 2021 /PRNewswire/ — Plume®, das Unternehmen hinter HomePass™, dem Smart-Home-Serviceangebot von mehr als 180 Internetanbietern (CSPs) in mehr als 23 Millionen Haushalten weltweit, bringt WorkPass™ auf den deutschsprachigen Markt.

Smart-Workplace-Suite hilft kleinen Unternehmen, ihre Büros und Ladengeschäfte intelligent zu verwalten und neue Erkenntnisse über die Bedürfnisse der Kunden zu gewinnen

PALO ALTO, Calif., 31. März 2021 /PRNewswire/ — Plume®, das Unternehmen hinter HomePass™, dem Smart-Home-Serviceangebot von mehr als 180 Internetanbietern (CSPs) in mehr als 23 Millionen Haushalten weltweit, bringt WorkPass™ auf den deutschsprachigen Markt. WorkPass basiert auf Home Pass und ergänzt das bisherige Angebot von Plume um eine Suite von intelligenten Diensten und Management-Tools für das moderne Büro oder Geschäft, speziell zugeschnitten auf die Bedürfnisse von kleinen Unternehmen.

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Plume Introduces WorkPass for Small BusinessPlume Introduces WorkPass for Small Business

„Die Ergebnisse unserer Studie zeigen[1], dass 42 Prozent der kleinen und mittleren Unternehmen planen, die Ausgaben für das WiFi-Management zu erhöhen. Die Verwaltung und Sicherung der Fülle von Geräten im lokalen Netzwerk ist ein wichtiger Investitionstreiber: Zwei Drittel der Unternehmen erwarten, dass sie in den nächsten zwei Jahren mehr Geräte anschließen werden. WiFi hilft auch kleinen Unternehmen erfolgreich zu sein, indem es neue Dienste wie Analyse der WiFi-Nutzung der Gäste, Gebäudesicherheit und Umgebungskontrolle ermöglicht”, sagt Camille Mendler, Chief Analyst, Service Provider Enterprise, Omdia.

WorkPass bietet eine Reihe von Diensten, die kleine Unternehmen dabei unterstützen, WLAN-Netzwerke, Cybersicherheit, Kundenanalyse, Marketing & Werbung und Mitarbeiterverwaltung mit einer Kombination aus App und Webportal zu managen. Dafür sind keine kostspielige IT-Infrastruktur oder Einzellösungen erforderlich. Der Do-it-yourself-Ansatz mit dem umfassendsten Serviceangebot für kleine Unternehmen macht WorkPass einzigartig.

Dienste wie Concierge wurden von Grund auf für die speziellen Bedürfnisse dieser Firmengröße entwickelt. Concierge™ bietet eine Analyse des Verhaltens von Besuchern mit Kriterien wie Besuchsfrequenz, Datennutzung oder Aufenthaltsdauer, um das eigene Service- und Produkt-Angebot entsprechend zu optimieren. Die Funktion Keycard™ unterstützt Unternehmen die Sicherheit des Arbeitsplatzes zu verbessern. All dies kann nach einfacher Installation über die WorkPass-Mobil-App verwaltet werden. WorkPass kann nahtlos mit anderen Tools von Plume integriert werden, beispielsweise mit den cloudbasierten Back-End-Support-und Marketing-Tools Haystack bzw. Signal.

„Die spezifischen Bedürfnisse von kleinen Unternehmen wurden viel zu lange ignoriert. Die Service-Anbieter haben versucht, diese Unternehmen entweder durch Angebote für Privatkunden oder für Großunternehmen zu bedienen, die einfach nicht für kleine Unternehmen passen”, sagt Fahri Diner, Co-Founder und CEO von Plume. „Bis jetzt gab es keine zweckmäßige Lösung, die umfangreiche datengesteuerte Tools und Analysen für diese Firmen und deren Service Provider bereitstellt und ohne einen IT-Experten installiert, verwaltet und betrieben werden kann. Unser Ziel mit WorkPass ist es, über eine einzige Bedienoberfläche neue Dienste anzubieten, die eine stets verfügbare, gemanagte Konnektivität, deutlich gesteigerte Produktivität, beispiellose Sicherheit und ein effizientes Marketing ermöglichen.”

„Wir freuen uns, dass Plume seine skalierbare Cloud-Plattform und sein KI-Know-how jetzt auch für kleine Unternehmen bereitstellt”, sagt Jeff Ross, President von Armstrong. „WorkPass bietet eine Reihe moderner Services – einschließlich adaptivem WLAN, Cybersecurity, Analyse des Besucherverhaltens in Echtzeit und LTE-Backup –, die alle darauf ausgelegt sind, die spezifischen betrieblichen Anforderungen eines Kleinunternehmern zu erfüllen. Als bestehender Kunde von Plume fügt sich diese neue Lösung nahtlos in unsere etablierten Systeme ein und erweitert sofort unser Portfolio, um neue Umsatz- und Servicemöglichkeiten zu schaffen.”

WorkPass bietet allen Netzwerkbenutzern ein intuitives Anwendererlebnis. Zu den wichtigsten Funktionen gehören:

Nahtlose, unterbrechungsfreie Konnektivität: WorkPass beinhaltet adaptives WiFi, das jeden Winkel der Geschäftsräume mit perfekter Internetabdeckung erreicht. Darüber hinaus optimieren die einzigartigen KI-gesteuerten Algorithmen von Plume kontinuierlich die Leistung jedes Geräts und jeder Anwendung. Netzwerke von überall aus kontrollieren: WorkPass bietet Unternehmen die Kontrolle über ihre Netzwerke und ermöglicht es ihnen, Gastnetzwerke, Sicherheitseinstellungen, Gerätezugriffe und vieles mehr direkt von ihren Smartphones aus zu verwalten. App-basierte Kontrollmechanismen ermöglichen es den Unternehmern, das Netzwerk zu überwachen oder Fehler zu beheben, wo immer sie sich befinden. Echtzeit-Einblicke, die kleinen Unternehmen helfen, erfolgreich zu sein: WorkPass bietet kleinen Unternehmen verwertbare Einblicke in das Kundenverhalten, die den Umsatz steigern und die Kundenbindung stärken. Concierge verwandelt Gästeanalysen mit Kriterien wie Besuchshäufigkeit, Datennutzung oder Aufenthaltsdauer in Möglichkeiten für zusätzliche Kontaktmomente. Die Funktion Flow™ nutzt eine revolutionäre WiFi-Sensortechnologie, um Präsenzerkennung in Echtzeit zu bieten und so Einblicke in die Besucherbewegung im Geschäft zu erhalten, was zu einer effektiveren Warenpräsentation, Personalplanung und Store-Layout führen kann. Digitale Sicherheit auf Basis künstlicher Intelligenz (KI) verbessert den Schutz kleiner Unternehmen vor neuen Bedrohungen: Die Cyberkriminalität entwickelt sich ständig weiter und kleine Unternehmen brauchen sichere Netzwerke, die immer einen Schritt voraus sind. WorkPass nutzt KI, um sicherzustellen, dass Daten, intelligente Geräte und letzten Endes die Unternehmen immer sicher sind. Mehrere Zugriffszonen sorgen dafür, dass Back-End-Systeme, Mitarbeiter und Kunden den für sie perfekten Zugang und die richtige Sicherheit haben. Flow™ alarmiert den Unternehmer, wenn außerhalb der Geschäftszeiten eine Bewegung im Büro oder Geschäft erkannt wird. Best-in-Class-Hardware: WorkPass nutzt die leistungsstarken SuperPods von Plume, die als Wi-Fi-5- (802.11 ac) und Wi-Fi-6- (802.11 ax) Systeme zur Montage an der Wand, der Decke oder auch auf Tischen geeignet sind. Das Open-Source-Framework OpenSync™ bietet eine zusätzliche Hardware-Auswahl und ermöglicht eine schnelle und skalierbare Bereitstellung von Diensten für alle Anwender im Unternehmen. LTE-Backup sorgt dafür, dass kleine Unternehmen während eines Festnetzausfalls nie die Konnektivität verlieren. Die Cloud-basierte Plattform von Plume aktualisiert sich selbst und skaliert nahtlos mit dem Unternehmen.

„Als Service-Provider mit einem umfangreichen Leistungsportfolio ist es unerlässlich, dass wir sowohl privaten Endkunden als auch kleinen Unternehmen ihren Kunden ein modernes digitales Benutzererlebnis bieten”, sagt Christy Batts, Broadband Division Director, CDE Lightband. „WorkPass sorgt dafür, dass unzuverlässiges WLAN und andere IT-Infrastruktursorgen der Vergangenheit angehören. Dies bringt Kleinunternehmen einen enormen Schub, wenn sie nach der Pandemie ihre Geschäfte wieder aufnehmen können. Wir planen, diese Cloud-basierte Technologie zu nutzen, die es kleinen und unabhängigen Unternehmen ermöglicht, auf Basis einer personalisierten Lösung modernste Services anzubieten, die es mit großen Unternehmen aufnehmen kann.”

WorkPass ist ab sofort für Service Provider weltweit in allen Märkten von Plume verfügbar. Hier finden Sie weitere Informationen.

Über Plume
Plume® hat die weltweit erste global eingesetzte SaaS-Experience-Plattform für Kommunikationsdienstleister (CSPs) und deren Abonnenten entwickelt. Als einzige offene und hardwareunabhängige Lösung ermöglicht Plume im großen Maßstab die schnelle Bereitstellung neuer Services für vernetzte Haushalte (und darüber hinaus). Die Kunden profitieren von selbstoptimierendem WLAN, Cybersicherheit, Zugangskontrollen, Kindersicherung, Bewegungserkennung und vielem mehr. CSPs erhalten zuverlässige Back-End-Anwendungen, die eine beispiellose Transparenz und sowohl einen reaktiven als auch präventiven Support ermöglichen. Plume nutzt OpenSync™, ein Open-Source-Framework, das auf den führenden Chipsatz-, CPE- und Plattform-SDKs vorintegriert ist und von diesen unterstützt wird.

Folgen Sie Plume aufLinkedIn undTwitter.

Plume, HomePass, WorkPass, Concierge, Keycard, Flow, SuperPod, und OpenSync sind Handelsmarken oder eingetragene Handelsmarken von Plume Design, Inc.

[1]Source: Digital SoHo and SME Insights Survey, Omdia, 2020

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SOURCE Plume Design, Inc.

PS5 and Xbox Series X backward compatibility: Everything you need to know – CNET

Playing your old games on a next-generation console is a huge deal in the quiet months after launch, when there aren’t many new titles to justify the hundreds of dollars you spent on a shiny new machine.

Playing your old games on a next-generation console is a huge deal in the quiet months after launch, when there aren’t many new titles to justify the hundreds of dollars you spent on a shiny new machine. Sony and Microsoft knew this as they launched their PlayStation 5 and Xbox Series X last year, both having hyped up their consoles’ backward compatibility features.

Now playing:Watch this: PS5 vs. Xbox Series X: the ultimate comparison
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The two companies have been battling other console makers for decades — Sony since 1994 and Microsoft since 2001 — so they’ve both built up magnificent back catalogs filled with classics. Let’s take a look at how much of each of those libraries you can play on the new consoles and how you can transfer your saves.

See alsoPS5 review: A space-age console for your next-gen dreamsXbox Series X review: Game Pass is the secret weaponXbox Series S review: Making next-gen gaming more affordableBest TVs for PS5 and Xbox Series X, Series S with 4K, 120fps input and VRR
PS5

The PS5, which starts at $400, was designed with PS4 games in mind, PlayStation boss Jim Ryan told CNET last June.

“PS4 titles get even better on PS5. Select PS4 titles will see increased loading speeds on the PS5 console, and will also leverage Game Boost, offering improved or more stable frame rates,” the company said in an Oct. 9 blog post. “Some titles with unlocked frame rates or dynamic resolution up to 4K may see higher fidelity.”

Read more:PS5 review: Sony built a space-age game console for your next-gen dreams

Ghost of Tsushima developer Sucker Punch gave us a sense of how Game Boost works: Once it’s enabled, you’ll “see an extra option to allow frame rates up to 60fps.”

For the 2018 God of War, developer Sony Santa Monica released a PS5 optimization patch on Feb. 2. Once that’s installed, you’ll be able to play in 4K resolution and at 60 frames per second.

Now playing:Watch this: PS5 review: full breakdown of all the new features
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The company also released a short list of PS4 games that won’t be playable on the PS5:

DWVRAfro Samurai 2 Revenge of Kuma Volume OneTT Isle of Man – Ride on the Edge 2Just Deal With It!Shadow Complex RemasteredRobinson: The JourneyWe SingHitman Go: Definitive EditionShadwenJoe’s Diner

It noted that these games will carry a “Playable on: PS4 only” warning in the PlayStation Store, so you don’t download them by accident.

On Oct. 30, Ubisoft released a separate list of PS4 games that won’t work on PS5. The most prominent one was 2015’s Assassin’s Creed: Syndicate. It later pulled that blog post, telling IGN it may have included “inaccuracies involving the Ubisoft titles that will be playable on PS5.” Players have since reported that Syndicate is playable, with some odd graphical glitches.

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Entertain your brain with the coolest news from streaming to superheroes, memes to video games.

The switch from spinning hard drive to solid-state storage will make them run faster than they did on the PS4, so you won’t be staring into the loading screen abyss for quite as long. I timed how long Ghost of Tsushima took from booting up to gameplay on each system; my launch on the PS4 took 1 minute and 40 seconds, on the PS5, it took exactly 1 minute.

If you subscribe to PS Plus, Sony’s $60-a-year online service, you get a selection of PS4 games to play at no extra cost through the PS5-only Plus Collection from Nov. 12 (you’ll also get free PS5 and PS4 games each month).


Sign up for PS Plus

First-party games BloodborneDays GoneDetroit: Become HumanGod of War (2018)Infamous Second SonRatchet and Clank The Last GuardianThe Last of Us RemasteredUntil DawnUncharted 4: A Thief’s End
Third-party games Batman: Arkham KnightBattlefield 1Call of Duty: Black Ops III — Zombies Chronicles EditionCrash Bandicoot N. Sane TrilogyFallout 4Final Fantasy 15 Royal EditionMonster Hunter: WorldMortal Kombat XPersona 5Resident Evil 7 biohazard

You can use your current DualShock 4 controller to play those PS4 games, but you’ll have to use the new DualSense for PS5 games. And PS5 won’t be backward compatible with PS3, PS2 or PS1 games.

32 of the best games on PS4See all photos



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Transferring saves

It’s possible to continue your PS4 adventures on the new console, and Sony has confirmed a few methods of transferring your saves.

“You can transfer digital games, game data, and game saves from a PS4 console to a PS5 console using LAN cables, or by connecting wirelessly (Wi-Fi). If you’ve already stored PS4 games and game data in the external USB storage device connected to your PS4, you can bring them over to PS5 with that external USB storage device,” the company said in an Oct. 9 blog post. “And if you are a PS Plus member, you can also sync PS4 game saves on PS5 through cloud storage.”

The cloud storage method is the simplest approach, but it’s a little fiddly. You’ll have to make sure the latest save is backed up to the cloud from your PS4 and manually download it on your PS5 — hopefully a future update will make the PS5 automatically detect and download cloud saves once a game is installed.

However, it warned that the ability to transfer game saves between a PS4 version and a PS5 version of the same game is down to the developer, and it’ll vary with cross-gen games. It’s highly unlikely that any developer will decide not to give you the power to transfer. So far, Marvel’s Spider-Man: Miles Morales and Sackboy: A Big Adventure are confirmed to have save transfers if you upgrade to the PS5 versions.

Revisiting PlayStation’s past?

If you want to play those dusty old original PlayStation, PS2 or PS3 discs, you’re out of luck. Sony moved away from backward compatibility after the initial batch of PS3s, and PS4 couldn’t play any games from the older consoles — so that 2008 copy of Metal Gear Solid 4 will remain on your shelf until the world goes cold. This is the case on PS5 as well.

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However, there are a few ways to access old games on PS5. There’s a selection of PS2 Classics you can buy on the PlayStation Network, and Sony’s $9.99 a month PS Now streaming service lets you access a massive library of PS2 and PS3 titles (along with a rotating selection of PS4 games — these can be downloaded to your console). These games are playable on the PS5.

Unfortunately, there’s no easy way to access the massive library of original PlayStation, PSP or PS Vita games without tracking down the old hardware or a mini console. Your options for playing classic games on PS3, PSP or Vita will soon become even more limited, since Sony is shutting down the PSN Store for those devices this summer.

Read more:Game subscription services: Read this before you choose one

Xbox Series X and Series S

Microsoft has been more ambitious with backward compatibility. The $499 Xbox Series X and $299 Series S play original Xbox, Xbox 360 and Xbox One games. That’s four generations of games, stretching back to the first console’s 2001 launch.

But it doesn’t include literally everything. Microsoft has a comprehensive list of the games that play on its new consoles: 568 games from the Xbox 360 and only 39 games from the original Xbox library are currently backward compatible. And titles that require its defunctKinect motion sensor won’t work at all.

Read more: Xbox Series X restock updates

Old games get a visual boost on the Series X and Series S, by way of high dynamic range graphics.

“After 500K+ hours of testing, we’re are excited to share that all Xbox, Xbox 360 and Xbox One games playable on Xbox One today, except for the handful that require Kinect, will be available — and look and play better — on Xbox Series X|S at launch,” Jason Ronald, Xbox director of program management, tweeted on Oct. 28.

Read more: Xbox Series S restock news

The new consoles’ hardware may also reduce game loading times and increase frame rates. It also offers the Quick Resume feature.

Save transfers

This is incredibly straightforward because Microsoft’s Smart Delivery system lets you transfer save files from any Xbox Series X compatible game.

“As was the case with our current backwards compatible titles, you won’t have to worry about losing any progress either,” the company said in a June 15 blog post. “Thanks to our commitment to compatibility across generations, you can be assured that when you purchase a game on Xbox One today, your game library, progression and entire gaming legacy moves forward with you if you jump into the next generation with Xbox Series X.”

Now playing:Watch this: Xbox Series X and Series S offer a fine-tuned, streamlined…
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If you’ve still got saves for 360 games you want to access, you can transfer to Xbox Series X by uploading it to the cloud. You can’t use this method to transfer saves from original Xbox games to the Series X, so you’ll have to start that Star Wars: Knights of the Old Republic play-through from scratch.

The 31 best games on Xbox OneSee all photos



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Maximizing your Xbox library

Microsoft also has a subscription service, the $10 a month Xbox Game Pass, that’ll get you access to a rotating library of older games. New Xbox exclusives also launch on the service, so you’ll get Halo Infinite and other upcoming games the day they become available. The $15 Game Pass Ultimate option will also get you access to Microsoft’s xCloud streaming service from Sept. 15.


Sign up for Xbox Game Pass

Unlike the PS5, you’ll have plenty of controller options no matter what generation of games you’re playing — the Series X and Series S controllers are compatible with Xbox One games, the Xbox One console itself and PCs. You can also use your Xbox One controllers on your Series X and Series S.


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Intelligentes Cloud-Netzwerk von Huawei beschleunigt die digitale Transformation

Das Netzwerk ist integraler Bestandteil der digitalen Transformation von Unternehmen. Zukunftssichere Unternehmensnetzwerke müssen optimale Cloud-Zugriffserfahrungen bieten, Services agil bereitstellen und aufrechterhalten, proaktiv Serviceänderungen erkennen und Netzwerkrisiken laufend vorhersagen können.

  • CloudCampus 3.0

Das Netzwerk ist integraler Bestandteil der digitalen Transformation von Unternehmen. Zukunftssichere Unternehmensnetzwerke müssen optimale Cloud-Zugriffserfahrungen bieten, Services agil bereitstellen und aufrechterhalten, proaktiv Serviceänderungen erkennen und Netzwerkrisiken laufend vorhersagen können.

CloudCampus 3.0

Die CloudCampus 3.0-Lösung von Huawei ist die ideale Wahl für Unternehmen, die ihre Campus-Netzwerke im Zeitalter der Cloud zukunftssicher machen wollen. Diese Lösung zeichnet sich durch ein „100 Mbit/s überall”, ein globales Netzwerk mit Hochgeschwindigkeits-SD-WAN-Verbindung, SDN-gesteuerte Cloud-Verwaltung und intelligente Betriebs- und Wartungsfunktionalitäten (O&M) für Benutzer und Anwendungen aus. Darüber hinaus enthält es eine Reihe völlig neuer Produkte, darunter die AirEngine Wi-Fi 6 APs, CloudEngine S Multi-GE-Switches, Wi-Fi 6 CPEs und die NetEngine AR8000 von Huawei. Diese neuen Produkte ermöglichen es Unternehmen, weitere Innovationen einzuführen, den Wert von Daten auszunutzen, die O&M-Effizienz zu verbessern und die Stabilität und Zuverlässigkeit von Diensten im Cloud-Zeitalter sicherzustellen.

CloudFabric 3.0

Die CloudFabric 3.0 Hyper-Converged Data Center Network Solution von Huawei ist die erste ihrer Art, die Netzwerkfunktionen für autonomes Fahren der Stufe 3 erreicht. Sie bietet eine vollständige Lebenszyklus-Automatisierung, die die Markteinführungszeit (TTM) um 90 Prozentz reduzieren kann, und liefert außerdem netzwerkweite intelligente O&M, so dass 90 Prozent der Fehler proaktiv vorhergesagt werden können. Basierend auf einer All-Ethernet-Architektur ist diese Lösung ideal geeignet, um verlustfreie Rechen- und Speichernetzwerke aufzubauen, die die volle Rechenleistung ausschöpfen und Unternehmen dabei helfen, intelligenter zu werden.

CloudWAN 3.0

Die CloudWAN 3.0-Lösung von Huawei ermöglicht es Unternehmen weltweit, zukunftssichere intelligente WANs zu entwickeln und damit ihre digitale Transformation zu beschleunigen. Im Zuge der Migration von Unternehmen in die Cloud und der Umstellung auf IP-basierte Produktionsnetzwerke integriert CloudWAN 3.0 mit seinen „fünf Einsern” neue Funktionen, die das Leben vereinfachen: 1-Hop-Cloud-Zugriff, 1-Fiber-Mehrzweck-Transport,1-Click-Schnellplanung, 1-Network-Wide-Verbindung und integrierte Sicherheit aus 1 Hand. Diese Funktionen beschleunigen die Bereitstellung von Diensten auf wenige Minuten, schaffen einen konvergenten Übermittlungsweg für alle Dienste über ein einziges Netzwerk, erleichtern die intelligente Optimierung des Datenverkehrs und den Lastausgleich und ermöglichen intelligentes O&M und End-to-End-Sicherheit.

Die intelligenten Cloud-Netzwerk-Angebote von Huawei haben in Bereichen wie Behörden, Finanzen, Transport und Energie breite Akzeptanz und Zustimmung gefunden. Auf der Huawei Industrial Digital Transformation Conference 2021 präsentierte Huawei außerdem eine umfangreiche Palette an szenariospezifischen Netzwerklösungen, darunter die Smart Customs Network Solution, Smart Campus Network Solution für Hochschulen, intelligente integrierte IP-Netzwerklösung für Flughäfen, eine intelligente Netzwerklösung für die Finanzindustrie, intelligente IP-Netzwerklösung für Energieübertragung und -umwandlung und die CloudCampus Network Solution für die Öl und Gasbranche.

Mit der Smart Customs Network Lösung bietet Huawei bietet intelligente Anwendungen und autonomes Fahren. Mit dieser Lösung können Kunden ihre digitale Transformation beschleunigen und eine neue Grundlage für intelligentes Zollwesen schaffen. Dadurch wird der grenzüberschreitende Handel sicherer und bequemer.

Im Hochschulbereich ermöglicht die Smart Campus Network Solution von Huawei ein qualitativ hochwertiges Lehrangebot durch den Aufbau einer hochmodernen digitalen Infrastruktur und die Integration von End-to-End-Netzwerksicherheit.

Im Bereich der Stromversorgung stützt sich die intelligente IP-Netzwerklösung von Huawei für die Stromübertragung und -umwandlung auf modernste Technologien – wie FlexE-basiertes Slicing, Ultrabreitband-All-Ethernet und intelligente Verwaltung und Steuerung – und bietet so ein dynamisches Netzwerkerlebnis. Diese Lösung ermöglicht es Elektrizitätsunternehmen weltweit, die digitale Transformation ihrer Stromnetze effektiv voranzutreiben und gleichzeitig den Übergang in die Ära des „Energie-Internets” zu beschleunigen.

Bis heute hat Huawei seine intelligenten Cloud-Netzwerk-Angebote an über 12.000 Kunden in mehr als 140 Ländern und Regionen geliefert. Mit Blick auf die Zukunft wird Huawei mit noch mehr Partnern zusammenarbeiten, Unternehmen weitere Innovationen ermöglichen und so zum Erfolg einer Vielzahl von Branchen beitragen und eine solide Grundlage für die digitale Transformation der Industrie schaffen.

Die Huawei Industrial Digital Transformation Conference 2021 fand vom 24. bis 26. März statt. Um mehr zu erfahren, klicken Sie auf https://e.huawei.com/en/events/industry-digital-transformation/2021.

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Globe leistet Pionierarbeit bei Daten als Währung auf den Philippinen

MANILA, Philippinen, 30. März 2021 /PRNewswire/ — Das führende philippinische Telekommunikationsunternehmen Globe hat während des ersten Globe Innovation Fest seine erste Innovation auf dem Markt, GBs (Gigabytes) to Points, vorgestellt.

MANILA, Philippinen, 30. März 2021 /PRNewswire/ — Das führende philippinische Telekommunikationsunternehmen Globe hat während des ersten Globe Innovation Fest seine erste Innovation auf dem Markt, GBs (Gigabytes) to Points, vorgestellt. Diese Funktion ist für Globe-Mobilfunk- und -Breitbandkunden verfügbar und ermöglicht es, ungenutzte Gigabytes an Kundendaten in Globe Rewards-Punkte umzuwandeln.

Globe Rewards ist das unvergleichliche Kundenbindungsprogramm des Telekommunikationsanbieters, das für den Kauf von lebenswichtigen Dingen wie Lebensmittel, Telco-Produkte und sogar Geräte genutzt werden kann und mit dem man für gute Zwecke spenden kann. Globe Rewards ist in dem Land sehr beliebt, da die Philippiner*innen ihre Punkte als Bargeld verwenden, um die Auswirkungen der COVID-19-Pandemie zu bewältigen.

Dadurch erhalten sowohl Mobilfunk- als auch Breitbandkunden mehr Wert für ihr Geld, denn mit „Daten als Währung” gehen keine ungenutzten Daten der Kunden verloren.

„Die Auswirkungen der Pandemie im Land waren enorm. Also haben wir die Art und Weise, wie Philippiner*innen ihre Daten nutzen, neu erfunden, weil wir glauben, dass jetzt der beste Zeitpunkt ist, um unseren Kunden zu helfen, die bereits von der Krise betroffen sind. Dies trägt dazu bei, dass sie für das, wofür sie bezahlen, einen echten Mehrwert erhalten”, sagte Issa Guevarra-Cabreira, stellvertretender Chief Commercial Officer von Globe.

Während Prepaid-Kunden für jedes umgewandelte GB 1 Punkt erhalten, können Postpaid-Kunden 1 GB in 10 Globe Rewards Punkte umwandeln. Ebenso können Globe At Home Prepaid WiFi Kunden 3 GB in 3 Rewards Punkte umwandeln.

„Daten können jederzeit innerhalb der Promo-Gültigkeit oder vor dem Stichtag des Plans in Punkte umgewandelt werden. Die Umwandlung ungenutzter Daten in Globe Rewards-Punkte kann über die Globe One-App erfolgen”, so Guevarra-Cabreira weiter.

Die Globe Rewards-Punkte können landesweit in über 13.000 Geschäften für Einkäufe, Restaurants, Unterhaltung, Reisen und Globe-Produkte verwendet werden.

Kunden können Globe Rewards-Punkte verwenden, um bei Lazada einzukaufen, Mahlzeiten bei GrabFood zu bestellen, koreanische Filme mit Viu anzusehen oder sogar Spiele über Razer Gold-Pins zu spielen.

„Die Kunden können sich Videos ansehen, Spiele spielen, online einkaufen und sogar Versicherungen abschließen, ohne etwas ausgeben zu müssen – und das alles in der Sicherheit ihres Zuhauses. Es gibt eine größere Welt zu entdecken mit dem neu erfundenen Globe Rewards”, sagte Guevarra-Cabreira.

Um mehr über Globe zu erfahren, besuchen Sie www.globe.com.ph.

Informationen zu Globe Telecom

Globe Telecom, Inc. ist ein führendes Full-Service-Telekommunikationsunternehmen auf den Philippinen und wird an der philippinischen Börse unter dem Börsenkürzel GLO gehandelt. Das Unternehmen bedient die Telekommunikations- und Technologiebedürfnisse von Privat- und Geschäftskunden mit einer ganzen Reihe von Produkten und Dienstleistungen, darunter Mobilfunk, Festnetz, Breitband, Datenverbindungen, Internet und Managed Services. Die Hauptinteressen des Unternehmens liegen in den Bereichen Finanztechnologie, digitale Marketinglösungen, Risikokapitalfinanzierung für Startups und virtuelle Gesundheitsversorgung. 2019 wurde Globe Unterzeichner des Global Compact der Vereinten Nationen und verpflichtete sich damit zur Umsetzung universeller Nachhaltigkeitsprinzipien. Ihre Auftraggeber sind die Ayala Corporation und Singtel, anerkannte Branchenführer im Land und in der Region. Weitere Informationen finden Sie unter www.globe.com.ph. Folgen Sie @enjoyglobe auf Facebook, Twitter, Instagram und YouTube.


Related Links

http://www.globe.com.ph

SOURCE Globe Telecom