LG pairs washers and dishwashers with Amazon Dash ahead of KBIS – CNET

LG has upgraded the smarts of its appliances in time for the Kitchen and Bath Industry Showcase (KBIS) in Las Vegas next week. You can now sync all of LG’s smart washers, dryers and dishwashers from 2018 and 2019 to Amazon Dash.

LG has upgraded the smarts of its appliances in time for the Kitchen and Bath Industry Showcase (KBIS) in Las Vegas next week. You can now sync all of LG’s smart washers, dryers and dishwashers from 2018 and 2019 to Amazon Dash. LG announced the upgrade on Thursday, which lets your smart appliance track and reorder detergent or dryer sheets automatically as they run low.

To take advantage of the new feature, you’ll need to sync your LG appliance to your Amazon Dash account. Amazon will let you specify your preferences as far as the brand and size of detergent or laundry supply you’d like to order. Your LG appliance tracks your usage through the LG ThinQ app, so it’ll know when you start to run out. The ThinQ app will then tell Amazon Dash to order more and Amazon will deliver the ordered supplies to your door.

Again, the upgrade applies to all Wi-Fi-enabled LG dishwashers, washers and dryers from 2018 and 2019. LG isn’t exactly breaking new ground here. Whirlpool and GE appliances have worked with Amazon Dash for years. Still, it’s a handy upgrade if you like Amazon Dash and already own an LG appliance.

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Qobuz takes on Spotify and Tidal by banking on sound quality – CNET

Spotify and Apple Music have another competitor today, music streaming service Qobuz has announced it is now available in the US.

French company Qobuz — pronounced ko-buzz– has been available in the UK and Europe for years.

Spotify and Apple Music have another competitor today, music streaming service Qobuz has announced it is now available in the US.

French company Qobuz — pronounced ko-buzz– has been available in the UK and Europe for years. Its focus is on sound quality rather than the breadth of its catalog. The company offers hi-res streams (without the need for proprietary equipment) as well as a download store, making it part HD Tracks and part Tidal.

Qobuz is offering four plans at launch:

Premium: $10 per month for 320 kbps MP3 quality streaming ($100 annually).Hi-Fi: $20 per month for streaming including 16-bit CD quality streaming ($200 annually).Studio: $25 per month for unlimited Hi-Res (24-bit, up to 192 khz) streaming ($250 annually).Sublime+: $300 per year for full Hi-Res streaming and 40 to 60 per cent discounts on purchases from the Qobuz Hi-Res (up to 24-bit, 192 khz) download store.

Competitor Tidal soft-launched in late 2014 as an audiophile streaming service but relaunched a year later — after Jay Z bought the company — with a focus on “stars” and urban music content. Tidal uses the MQA format for hi-res delivery (which needs a specialized decoder) but Qobuz offers non-proprietary 24/192 FLAC streams making it compatible with more people’s audio equipment. It’s worth noting that Tidal doesn’t charge extra for hi-res content, though.

Related LinksSpotify vs. Apple Music: Which is the best music service?What is FLAC? The high-def MP3 explainedBest music streaming app: Spotify, Apple Music, Tidal and more comparedTest your music system with these great rock tracks

We at CNET have been testing the Studio tier for several weeks using its Roon software integration. The catalog caters to most of our needs while also offering some hi-res content that Tidal doesn’t have. For example ex-Beta Band singer Steve Mason’s excellent About the Light by is available in 24-bit while Tidal’s version is 16-bit. Beirut’s new Gallipoli (24/44.1) album sounded clear and full when I streamed it through Q Acoustics 3050i speakers.


Test your music system with these great rock tracks
21 Photos

Qobuz is taking aim at the audiophile crowd, so its home page skews towards singer-songwriters and classical music. But how will the service cope in a crowded market? Qobuz competitor Tidal’s dual personalities — cool urban brand and audiophile streaming service — have never coalesced into something cohesive, and its early instability and partial sale to Sprint has left the industry wary.

The streaming music industry may be popular but it’s increasingly cut-throat, and the largest streaming provider Spotify has only just making a profit. It’s too early to call Qobuz’s chances, but I look forward to (literally) hearing more from it in the future.

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The rugged Samsung Galaxy Tab Active2 launched in India at Rs 50,990

Samsung’s latest rugged tablet, the Samsung Galaxy Tab Active2, is launched in the Indian market.

Unlike most Samsung products, this tablet, in particular, puts durability over design and hardware features. Targeted toward outdoor workers and B2B professionals, the Active2 rugged tablet will make for a competent option for those who have to deal with a risk of abuse at their workplace.

Samsung’s latest rugged tablet, the Samsung Galaxy Tab Active2, is launched in the Indian market.

Unlike most Samsung products, this tablet, in particular, puts durability over design and hardware features. Targeted toward outdoor workers and B2B professionals, the Active2 rugged tablet will make for a competent option for those who have to deal with a risk of abuse at their workplace.

Samsung Galaxy Tab Active2 specs and features

This tablet features an 8-inch 1,200 x 800 TFT display and an Exynos 7870 octa-core chipset with 3GB of RAM and a massive 4,450mAh battery powers the Android Nougat-flavoured experience. For storage, it offers 16GB internal memory and a dedicated micro SD card slot (up to 256GB).

Suited for use with gloves thanks to its physical navigation buttons beneath the screen, the Active 2 can withstand dust, water and drops at any angle thanks to its IP68 and MIL-STD-810 ratings. It comes with a rugged rubber casing that keeps the externals intact from accidental drops on any kind of surface. The Active2 also features user-replaceable batteries, so you can swap it out and change with a spare if required.

This model comes with an S-Pen, similar to the one we saw on the Galaxy Tab S3. It brings additional productivity features to the tablet, making it even more relevant for B2B industry. Since it’s a rugged tablet, it comes with a slight compromise on the display and design. Don’t expect Galaxy Tab S4 like thin bezels and rich AMOLED display from this tablet. It shares less in common with the company’s slick lineup.

Same goes with the 8MP rear and 5MP front camera. They can be used to click decent pictures for a rugged tablet, but don’t expect it to be a reliable photography device.

However, it gets all the necessary connectivity options like single Nano SIM, WiFi, Bluetooth v4.2, USB Type-C, POGO pin for charging and keyboard, NFC and Wireless mirroring. It also has a fingerprint sensor and face unlock for security first level security.

In terms of availability, Samsung Galaxy Tab Active2 will be available in India from mid-March 2019 at a price of Rs 50,990.

Take a gander at our list of the best tablets

Best compact camera 2019: 10 top compact cameras to suit all abilities

From simple snappers for beginners to high-end powerhouses, here are the best compact cameras you can buy right now.

Compact cameras and the compact camera market have changed considerably over the last few years.

From simple snappers for beginners to high-end powerhouses, here are the best compact cameras you can buy right now.

Compact cameras and the compact camera market have changed considerably over the last few years. Smartphones, with their ever-improving cameras, have decimated budget models and as a result camera manufacturers have concentrated on putting more advanced features into compact cameras to make them more attractive than ever before.

Compared to compact cameras of old, manufacturers are now tending to design models based around physically larger sensors than used to be the norm. The result of this change is that you’re now going to get significantly better image quality than even the best smartphone. In some cases, the sensors in some high-end compact cameras can rival DSLRs and mirrorless cameras.

The wide variety of different compact cameras means there’s a wealth of choice out there to pretty much suit all photographic needs and budgets.

There are small compact cameras that can slip in a pocket yet have huge zoom ranges, and large bridge cameras that look like DSLRs, but have a large, fixed zoom lens and lots of automated easy-to-use options (though don’t expect DSLR-rivalling image quality). That’s not forgetting waterproof options and high-end models that are a great alternative to a DSLR or mirrorless camera should you want something a bit more portable.

If you need a bit more help figuring out what kind of camera you need, then your best place to start is by reading this article: What camera should I buy?

Otherwise, read on to find out our pick of the best compact cameras you can buy right now.

Before we take a look at our pick of the compact cameras out there today, we wanted to highlight a great value option. Sony’s latest camera in its RX100 line, the RX100 VI, is one of our favourite compact cameras right now, but there’s no getting away from the fact that it’s a pricey option. The good news is that all of the previous generation models are still available at much more tempting prices. Sitting in the middle of this is the RX100 III and while it might not offer some of the latest features it’s still a great compact at a bargain price. The large 1.0-inch sensor delivers excellent levels of detail, with the broad and fast range of the zoom lens making it a versatile travelling companion. There’s also a built-in pop-up viewfinder and a tilting screen (though its not touch-sensitive). Take into account the sleek, premium finish and it all adds up to a great compact camera at a great price.

Read our in-depth Sony Cyber-shot RX100 III review

Best compact cameras in 2019

It may be one of the more expensive options here and it’s not a compact for everyone, but if you’re after a high-quality camera, you’re not going to be disappointed with the fabulous X100F. Everything about it oozes class. Unlike a lot of compacts here, it has a fixed lens as opposed to a zoom, but this 35mm equivalent f/2.0 lens is paired with a DSLR-sized 24.3MP APS-C sensor that delivers cracking results. There’s also the tactile external controls and clever hybrid viewfinder – you have the option of electronic and optical views make it a joy to shoot with. You’ll need some photo knowledge to get the best from it, but the X100F is an exquisite camera that you’ll cherish if you take the plunge.

Read our in-depth Fujifilm X100F review

Panasonic invented the travel-zoom camera genre – compact cameras that you can fit in a pocket but that have long zoom lenses built-in. Despite strong competition, the ZS range (known as TZ outside the US) has continued to dominate sales, and it looks set to continue this with the brilliant Lumix ZS200 (called TZ200 outside the US). As we first saw with the Lumix ZS100 / TZ100, Panasonic has been able to keep the camera body about the same size as earlier ZS-series cameras but squeeze a much larger 1-inch sensor into the camera to deliver much better image quality. The zoom lens isn’t quite so extensive as some, but the versatile 15x zoom should be more than enough for most users, while you also get (an admittedly small) electronic viewfinder, 4K video and a great touchscreen interface. If you’re looking for a neat all-in-one compact camera that delivers great images, this is it.

Read our in-depth Panasonic Lumix ZS200 / TZ200 review

If you’re looking for a powerful all-in-one bridge camera, then the RX10 IV from Sony is the best there is. You’ll pay a premium for that performance, but when you look at what else is out there for the same price, the RX10 IV is virtually in a league of its own. Featuring a huge 24-600mm f/2.4-4 zoom lens, the RX10 IV builds on the RX10 III with an overhauled AF system that now does justice to the rest of the camera, while the 1-inch, 20.1MP sensor is capable of achieving excellent levels of detail. Handling is very polished, feeling like a DSLR in the hand and complemented by a large and bright electronic viewfinder. That’s not forgetting the ability to capture video in 4K and shoot at up to 24fps. Impressive stuff.

Read our in-depth Sony Cyber-shot RX10 IV review

While there’s now a decent selection of premium 1.0-inch sensor compact cameras to choose from, the Canon PowerShot G9 X Mark II sets itself apart thanks to its dinky proportions and streamlined controls. The highly pocketable dimensions do mean there are sacrifices to be made, with the PowerShot G9 X Mark II featuring a relatively short focal length zoom lens. However, if you’re looking for a neat compact camera that can produce vastly superior images to your smartphone, and has decent connectivity options and simple-to-use controls, the PowerShot G9 X Mark II is an excellent choice.

Read our in-depthCanon PowerShot G9 X Mark II review

While the 24-75mm zoom lens is modest for a compact, don’t discount the Lumix LX100 II if you’re looking for a versatile compact that delivers great images. Not only does the lens have a fast variable maximum aperture of f/1.7-2.8, but the multi-aspect ratio 17MP Micro Four Thirds sensor means it delivers some of the best images you’re likely to see from a compact camera. There’s also a nifty built-in electronic viewfinder, large touchscreen (though it doesn’t pull away from the body unfortunately), 4K video and a decent array of body-mounted controls.

Read our in-depth Panasonic Lumix LX100 II review

Sony’s original RX100 was a landmark camera that fused a 1-inch sensor in a compact, metal body with the controls and image quality demanded by enthusiasts. The RX100 VI goes several steps further, though, with a ‘stacked’ sensor design for high-speed data capture. This means it can shoot 4K video, amazing 40x slow motion and still images at 24fps in continuous burst mode. That’s not forgetting the neat little built-in electronic viewfinder that its rivals lack, while this sixth generation model now packs an impressive 24-200mm zoom lens. It’s a pricey option and does have its quirks, but if you’re looking for a versatile, pocket-sized compact with a quality zoom lens, you won’t be disappointed.

Read our in-depth Sony Cyber-shot RX100 VI review

This trend towards bigger sensors shows up in the Panasonic Lumix FZ2000 (known as the FZ2500 in the US). Bridge cameras are very popular because they offer a colossal zoom range at a modest cost. To design a big zoom, though, the makers have to use a tiny sensor – and here Panasonic took the wise choice to sacrifice zoom range for better quality. The Panasonic FZ2000 uses a 1-inch sensor, and while the zoom tops out at 480mm equivalent, which is relatively short for a bridge camera, that’s still plenty for all but the most extreme everyday use. We love the FZ2000 because it delivers both image quality and zoom range – if you’re looking for something a bit cheaper, the older FZ1000 is still available.

Read our in-depthPanasonic Lumix FZ2000 / FZ2500 review

Keen photographers usually go for a DSLR or mirrorless camera, but they also want something that will slip in a pocket for those days when the big camera needs to stay at home. Usually, that means putting up with a smaller sensor – but not this time. Somehow, Canon has shoehorned a DSLR-sized APS-C sensor into a compact camera body. There’s also a built-in electronic viewfinder and refined touchscreen interface. The zoom range is a bit modest at 24-72mm, but there’s nothing else quite like it.

Read our in-depth Canon PowerShot G1 X Mark III review

Waterproof down to 15m, the Tough TG-5 is also crushproof to 100kg and drop-proof from 2.1m. It can even be used in temperatures as low as -10°C. If you want a rugged, go-anywhere camera, this is it. Olympus has taken the unusual step of actually dropping the pixel count from 16MP on the TG-4 to 12MP on the TG-5 for a better high ISO performance. Add in raw file support and this makes image quality that bit better than its predecessor, while it can shoot 4K video at 30p or high speed footage at 120p in Full HD. Our pick of the waterproof bunch of compacts.

Read our in-depthOlympus Tough TG-5 review

If you’re wanting a compact camera that can do a better job than your smartphone the WX220 ticks a lot of boxes, especially when you consider the extra flexibility offered by the 10x optical zoom, running from 25-250mm. Images are bright and punchy, with decent detail – ideal for sharing online or printing at typical sizes – while it’s nice to see Wi-Fi connectivity included as well. The 2.7-inch screen is a little on the small side, but that does help to keep the dimensions of the camera to a pocket-friendly size. The WX220 may not have lots of bells and whistles, but what it does do, it does well.

Read our in-depth Sony Cyber-shot WX220 review

Best bridge cameraBest travel cameraBest cheap cameraBest action cameraBest waterproof cameraBest cameraBest DSLRBest mirrorless camera

Streaming newcomer Qobuz takes on Spotify and Tidal with sound quality focus – CNET

Spotify and Apple Music have another competitor today, music streaming service Qobuz has announced it is now available in the US.

French company Qobuz — pronounced ko-buzz– has been available in the UK and Europe for years.

Spotify and Apple Music have another competitor today, music streaming service Qobuz has announced it is now available in the US.

French company Qobuz — pronounced ko-buzz– has been available in the UK and Europe for years. Its focus is on sound quality rather than the breadth of its catalog. The company offers hi-res streams (without the need for proprietary equipment) as well as a download store, making it part HD Tracks and part Tidal.

Qobuz is offering four plans at launch:

Premium: $10 per month for 320 kbps MP3 quality streaming ($100 annually).Hi-Fi: $20 per month for streaming including 16-bit CD quality streaming ($200 annually).Studio: $25 per month for unlimited Hi-Res (24-bit, up to 192 khz) streaming ($250 annually).Sublime+: $300 per year for full Hi-Res streaming and 40 to 60 per cent discounts on purchases from the Qobuz Hi-Res (up to 24-bit, 192 khz) download store.

Competitor Tidal soft-launched in late 2014 as an audiophile streaming service but relaunched a year later — after Jay Z bought the company — with a focus on “stars” and urban music content. Tidal uses the MQA format for hi-res delivery (which needs a specialized decoder) but Qobuz offers non-proprietary 24/192 FLAC streams making it compatible with more people’s audio equipment. It’s worth noting that Tidal doesn’t charge extra for hi-res content, though.

Related LinksSpotify vs. Apple Music: Which is the best music service?What is FLAC? The high-def MP3 explainedBest music streaming app: Spotify, Apple Music, Tidal and more comparedTest your music system with these great rock tracks

We at CNET have been testing the Studio tier for several weeks using its Roon software integration. The catalog caters to most of our needs while also offering some hi-res content that Tidal doesn’t have. For example ex-Beta Band singer Steve Mason’s excellent About the Light by is available in 24-bit while Tidal’s version is 16-bit. Beirut’s new Gallipoli (24/44.1) album sounded clear and full when I streamed it through Q Acoustics 3050i speakers.


Test your music system with these great rock tracks
21 Photos

Qobuz is taking aim at the audiophile crowd, so its home page skews towards singer-songwriters and classical music. But how will the service cope in a crowded market? Qobuz competitor Tidal’s dual personalities — cool urban brand and audiophile streaming service — have never coalesced into something cohesive, and its early instability and partial sale to Sprint has left the industry wary.

The streaming music industry may be popular but it’s increasingly cut-throat, and the largest streaming provider Spotify has only just making a profit. It’s too early to call Qobuz’s chances, but I look forward to (literally) hearing more from it in the future.

The Smartest Stuff: Innovators are thinking up new ways to make you, and the things around you, smarter.

Tech Culture: From film and television to social media and games, here’s your place for the lighter side of tech. guidance

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7 security tips to stop apps from stealing your data – CNET

We regularly see news about ways our personal information has been compromised after a data breach — and apps can be part of the problem. Apps have been unmasked as malware, used to commit click fraud or to sell your data to third parties in recent years.

We regularly see news about ways our personal information has been compromised after a data breach — and apps can be part of the problem. Apps have been unmasked as malware, used to commit click fraud or to sell your data to third parties in recent years.

You might feel nervous every time you download a new app. How can you trust that it won’t steal your data? Unfortunately, there’s no way to tell at face value if an app has darker motives and no protection is foolproof in today’s world of ever-evolving technology. An app that behaves well today could turn into a bad actor tomorrow if the company behind the app is sold or changes its direction.

We reached out to data privacy experts for their top tips to protect your personal data when using apps. Here are their seven suggestions.

Download.com exclusive: New app to protect your privacy will run on iOS, Android, Windows, and Mac


Best dating apps of 2019
13 Photos

1. Use a password manager

Yes it’s a cliche, but having a strong password is the first step to keeping your personal data safe. “Password” and “123456” took the top two spots on SpashData’s Top 100 worst passwords for 2018.

You might think you’re being clever by replacing letters with numbers or symbols, but it does little to make the password stronger. In actuality, a password’s strength is measured based on its ability to withstand a brute force attack, a systematic onslaught of guesses by a hacker.

The strongest passwords are random strings of characters. A series of letters, numbers and symbols in no particular order is less likely to be found in the dictionary and harder for a computer to crack with brute force. The downside is that these complex passwords are much harder to remember.

This is where a password manager app comes in handy. Password managers keep all your passwords in one encrypted and password-protected app. They also generate and remember strong passwords.

It’s also best to avoid using the same password for multiple accounts. If one account is compromised in a data breach, all the accounts are compromised. With a password manager, each one of your accounts can have a different, complex and hard-to-crack password.

Joe Baker, an IT Systems Administrator at Anderson Technologies recommends LastPass (download for iOS or Android).

2. Use a VPN on public Wi-Fi

Using a virtual private network (VPN), especially when you’re on public wi-fi, is an important part of keeping your data safe.

VPNs can keep your data from being snooped on by other people lurking on the same public network. They can also mask your data transmissions, avoid filtering and censorship on the internet and allow you to access a wider variety of content around the world.

When looking for a provider, it’s important to research the company to find out if it’s well-known and trustworthy. The Apple App Store and the Google Play Store have dozens of VPN apps that are free but have questionable practices.

Regardless of how frequently you plan to use a VPN, it’s important to read through the service agreement so you know what data might be collected and where it will be stored. See CNET’s guide to the best VPNs.

3. Be mindful of app permissions

One tip that almost all of the experts mentioned was double checking which permissions the app asks for.

“If you grant an app permission to access your contacts list, GPS data, pictures — or anything else — you must assume it is using that data,” Ray Walsh, a digital privacy expert at BestVPN.com told CNET. “Always check all permissions during installation and revoke as many permissions as possible in your device settings.”

You should also ask yourself whether it makes sense for an app to be asking for certain permissions. Stephen Hart, CEO of Cardswitcher told CNET that if an app asks for access to data that isn’t relevant to its function, that’s a major warning sign.

“[If] you’re downloading a simple app for a pocket calculator for instance and the app is requesting access to your contact list and location,” Hart said. “Why would a calculator need to see your contact list and location? Requests like that should ring some alarm bells.”

In addition to paying attention to permissions that you grant to an app, it’s also important to monitor how your phone behaves after you download it. Shlomie Liberow, a technical program manager and security guru at HackerOne said that drastic changes in your device’s battery life are another red flag.

“If after installing an app, you notice your battery life decreasing faster than usual, that may be a tell-tale sign that the app is up to no good and is likely operating in the background,” Liberow told CNET. “Often, malicious apps would constantly run in the background to repeatedly upload user data such as contacts from the phone.”

Last December, digital security firm Sophos released a list of almost two dozen apps that were found guilty of click fraud resulting in data overages and dramatically draining the device’s battery life.


Privacy advocates rank the creepiest tech gifts of 2018
11 Photos

4. Research the app or company

While you can’t tell at face value if an app has sinister motives, a quick Google search can help you better understand if an app is safe. The experts suggested searching the name of the app and the phrase “data scandal” or “scam.”

Hart said the results should tell you if the company has experienced any recent privacy or data leaks.

“This search should also tell you if data breaches are a common occurrence at that company and, if they have experienced any, how they have responded to them,” Hart said. “If the company has been affected several times and done nothing to address the problem, steer clear of the app — it suggests that they aren’t taking the issue seriously.”

Baker said it’s wise to avoid an app if it’s the only one a developer has produced or if the developer was responsible for any other shady apps.

5. Limit social media exposure

This tip might be the most difficult to implement since social media apps are among the most-used apps on phones.

Facebook’s Cambridge Analytica data scandal put the social network in hot water. The fallout resulted in a mass exodus of the site’s younger users. But even people who’ve freed themselves of Facebook’s siren call (or never created a profile in the first place) might still be at risk for privacy invasion.

If you appear on a friend or family member’s account, you’re still visible online. After those accounts are observed, companies can construct a “shadow profile” that details a person’s likes, dislikes, political leanings, religious beliefs and more.

It’s wise to limit the amount of information you share on social media, regardless of what the site asks for on your profile. The more information you share, the more data that’s available to create advertisements for you. Only fill out the absolute minimum amount of information necessary and don’t volunteer extra data just to make your profile more “complete.”

“Smartphone apps are generally more ‘thorough’ when it comes to targeted advertising. There’s even concern among some about those programs accessing your phone’s microphone (presumably for more targeted advertising),” Bobby Kittleberger, head of Legal Software Help, told CNET.

And don’t forget that the more information you provide in a profile, the more information is at risk in the event of a data breach.


9 Android augmented reality apps you should try
11 Photos

6. Keep software up to date

Making time to update your smartphone’s OS is critical, according to Walsh. Staying on top of OS updates can keep your device and data safer by helping stay a step ahead of hackers and the latest exploits they are spreading across the internet and the dark web.

“Think of software updates like vaccinations for your smartphone,” Hart said. “The methods that criminals use to hack into your phone and steal your data are constantly evolving, so the ways that we protect our smartphones need to evolve too.”

Hart suggested adjusting your phone’s settings so it’ll update automatically and you won’t have to manually authorize new updates.

7. Only download apps from Google and Apple’s stores

Not all the apps in the App Store or the Google Play Store are 100 percent trustworthy, but experts still say you should only download apps from those places.

“Apps available on these platforms will have been vetted to ensure that they meet a standard quality of data protection and will also be required to produce a dedicated privacy policy for you, telling you just how they protect your data,” Hart told CNET.

Downloading an app from a less reputable source increases the risk to your device and personal data. Walsh warns that apps downloaded from unofficial or insecure websites are vulnerable to ransomware, malware, spyware and trojan viruses.

“In the worst cases, this can lead to hackers taking full control of devices, to commandeer the camera or microphone for example,” Walsh said.

The Google Play Store’s developer restrictions are laxer than Apple, according to Baker, which leads to a higher possibility of spam or malicious code in an app.

More privacy tipsBest apps for securing Android and managing privacy settings (Download.com)5 things you can do in 5 minutes to boost your internet privacy (Download.com)Now this Android spyware poses as a privacy tool to trick you into downloading (ZDNet)3 things businesses need to know about customer privacy expectations (TechRepublic)

“The Apple store performs third-party vetting on all apps it hosts, and even previously trusted applications — like the Facebook controversy — can be removed from the Apple store when a breach of trust or information comes to light,” Baker said.

In addition to avoiding apps that are the only one a developer as produced, Baker encourages users to see how long an app has been available before downloading it. After it’s been out for longer, you can make a better decision based on user reviews.

Reviews are also important to take into consideration, according to Baker.

“A natural assortment of reviews should include varied rankings,” he said. “Some fraudulent apps will also display fraudulent reviews.”

You should question irregular patterns of speech, high ratings with no description or explanation. Baker also said to check if an app has been written about on a third-party site.

“Long-form reviews from peers are going to be the best and most reliable source of information here,” Baker said.

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Google, plagued by data and privacy issues, still rakes it in: The company is facing scandal but business is still good.

On Data Privacy Day, here’s a reminder that you have none: Or at least very little.

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Amtrak Offers Trip for Two with Its Buy One Get One Free Valentine’s Day Sale

WASHINGTON, Feb. 14, 2019 /PRNewswire/ — Amtrak wants to show customers how much we love them with its Valentine’s Day Buy One Get One Free Sale. Starting Thursday, Feb.

WASHINGTON, Feb. 14, 2019 /PRNewswire/ — Amtrak wants to show customers how much we love them with its Valentine’s Day Buy One Get One Free Sale. Starting Thursday, Feb. 14, through Monday, Feb. 18, customers can buy one ticket and get the second one free for nationwide travel between Mar. 25 and July 29, 2019, with no blackout dates.

Amtrak wants to show how much we love customers by offering a great way for customers and their loved ones to travel for a weekend away or on a leisurely vacation. From couples, to moms, to friends, to every loved one, Amtrak encourages individuals to give more than chocolates, flowers and valentines this year. Instead consider gifting a trip on Amtrak with a two for the price of one, Buy One Get One Free Sale. Two customers can travel together in coach for as low as:

Route

Price

Cities

Price

Washington, D.C. – Charlotte

$90

San Francisco – Portland

$92

Chicago – Kansas City

$69

Atlanta – Washington, D.C.

$129

Boston – New York

$83

New York – Washington, D.C.

$96

Acela

$125

Acela

$173

Los Angeles – Portland

$121

Detroit – Chicago

$39

Portland (ME) – Boston

$29

Seattle – Portland

$35

Washington, D.C. – Orlando

$135

Chicago – New Orleans

$135

*Fares will vary by train

Being able to easily travel from/to city centers, Amtrak offers free Wi-Fi on most trains, the freedom to use phones and electronic devices at all times (no “airplane mode”), the ability to travel with small pets on many trains, large spacious seats with ample leg room, no middle seat, and one of the most generous baggage policies in the travel industry, applicable for two personal items and two carry-on bags.

The sale is available at Amtrak.com, and all prices will be automatically discounted from the standard fare price. This offer is valid for travel on all reserved service. This offer is not valid on unreserved service, including the Pennsylvanian, Keystone Service, Capitol Corridor, Hiawatha Service, Pacific Surfliner and 7000-8999 Thruways. Fares are one way (adult) and no additional discounts apply. Adults must travel together and be booked in the same reservation. Valid for coach seats only; no upgrades allowed. This offer if not combinable with any other discount offer. Sale prices are not available at all times and on all routes. This offer is also subject to any restrictions, blackouts and refund rules that apply to the type of fare purchased, a 25 percent cancellation fee may apply. Please refer to discount code C125.

About Amtrak®
Amtrak offers a more comfortable and convenient travel experience with free Wi-Fi on most trains, plenty of leg room and no middle seat. With our state and commuter partners, we move people, the economy and the nation forward, carrying more than 30 million Amtrak customers for each of the past seven years. Amtrak operates more than 300 trains daily, connecting more than 500 destinations in 46 states, the District of Columbia and three Canadian Provinces, and reaches 400 additional destinations via connecting bus routes. Book travel, check train status, access your eTicket and more through an Amtrak app. Learn more at Amtrak.com.

SOURCE Amtrak

Related Links

https://www.amtrak.com

Full Frame For The Masses! Canon Introduces Its Second Full-Frame Mirrorless Camera – The EOS RP

The new Canon EOS RP full-frame mirrorless camera features a 26.2 megapixel CMOS sensor that is powered by the company’s DIGIC 8 image processor, providing users with high-image quality, outstanding operation and functionality.

The new Canon EOS RP full-frame mirrorless camera features a 26.2 megapixel CMOS sensor that is powered by the company’s DIGIC 8 image processor, providing users with high-image quality, outstanding operation and functionality. The new Canon EOS RP features Dual Pixel CMOS Auto Focus (AF) with 4,779 manually selectable AF pointsii and a wide AF coverage area of 88 percent horizontal and 100 percent vertical. With f/1.2 lenses, the camera astonishingly boasts AF sensitivity in low light in as little as Exposure Value (EV) -5. When using the RF 24-105mm F4 L IS USM lens with the EOS RP, the camera can focus in as little as 0.05 seconds with Dual Pixel CMOS AFiii. When using eye detection AF, the camera can automatically detect faces and focus on the eye of the subject. This feature is supported when the camera is set in either servo AF mode during continuous shooting and movie servo AF, as well as one-shot AF.

Like the EOS R full-frame mirrorless camera that was announced in September 2018, the EOS RP is built around the same 54mm mount diameter and short-back focus. This allows for the use of one of three optional mount adapters for full compatibility with all existing EF, EF-S, TS-E and MP-E lenses. Through the use of the optional Drop-In Filter Mount Adapter or Control Ring Mount Adapter, these lenses, in fact, gain functionality.

For photographers looking to further expand their abilities and capture a wide variety of both still and video images, the EOS RP features Visual Guide mode. First introduced with the EOS Rebel T7i and EOS 77D, this mode allows users to see on screen how switching modes on the mode dial or tweaking settings can alter the image they are about to capture. This mode helps to guide photographers to capture more compelling images, such as ones with a shallow depth-of-field or being able to give moving subjects a frozen or flowing look. For those looking to expand their imaginative options, the camera also features Creative Assist mode that allows photographers to use new and unique visual effects and adjustments when shooting, such as brightness, contrast, saturation, color tone, monochrome and background blur. In addition, the design, ergonomics, layout and ease-of-use of the camera are very similar to that of other Canon cameras consumers might already be familiar with.

Additional noteworthy features of the EOS RP camera include:

Built-in 0.39 inch, 2.36 million dot Electronic Viewfinder with Touch-and-Drag AFVari-Angle LCD touchscreen4K UHD 24P/Full HD 60p video recording with 4K time-lapse shooting and the ability to extract still images from 4K video recordingsISO range of 100-25,600 that is expandable up to ISO of 102,400Built-in Wi-Fi®iv and Bluetooth®v technologyMobile RAW workflow supported paired with Digital Photo Professional Express Appvi

Availability and Pricing
The Canon EOS RP full-frame mirrorless camera is scheduled to be available in March 2019 for an estimated retail price of $1299.00 for the body only. It will also be sold as a body-and-lens kit with the RF 24-105mm F4 L IS USM lens for $2399.00*

To learn more about the EOS R system, including in-depth educational tutorials, please visit usa.canon.com

About Canon U.S.A., Inc.
Canon U.S.A., Inc., is a leading provider of consumer, business-to-business, and industrial digital imaging solutions to the United States and to Latin America and the Caribbean markets. With approximately $36 billion in global revenue, its parent company, Canon Inc. (NYSE: CAJ), ranks third overall in U.S. patents granted in 2018† and is one of Fortune Magazine’s World’s Most Admired Companies in 2018. Canon U.S.A. is dedicated to its Kyosei philosophy of social and environmental responsibility. To keep apprised of the latest news from Canon U.S.A., sign up for the Company’s RSS news feed by visiting www.usa.canon.com/rss and follow us on Twitter @CanonUSA.

†Based on weekly patent counts issued by United States Patent and Trademark Office.

† Based on weekly patent counts issued by United States Patent and Trademark Office.

iWhen attaching an EF-S lens via any of Canon’s new R-series mount adapters, the EOS RP automatically switches to an APS-C crop mode.

iiAvailable AF points may decrease when shooting with AF cropping or in movie mode, or depending on camera settings or lens attached.

iiiBased on results of AF speed tests in accordance with CIPA guidelines. Results may vary depending on shooting conditions and lens in use. Relies on internal measurement method.

– Brightness at time of distance measurement: EV12(regular temperature, ISO 100)
– Shooting mode: M
– Lens in use: RF 24-105mm F4 L IS USM, with focal distance of 24mm and live-view mode on (with manual shutter button operation)
– AF mode: Live single-point AF(central) and AF operation: One-shot AF

ivCompatible with iOS® versions 9.3/10.3, Android™ smartphone and tablet versions 4.4/5.0/5.1/6.0/7.0/7.1. Data charges may apply with the download of the free Canon Camera Connect app. This app helps enable you to upload images to social media services. Please note that image files may contain personally identifiable information that may implicate privacy laws. Canon disclaims and has no responsibility for your use of such images. Canon does not obtain, collect or use such images or any information included in such images through this app.

vCompatible with select smartphone and tablet devices (Android™ version 5.0 or later and the following iOS® devices: iPhone 4s or later, iPad 3rd gen. or later, iPod Touch 5th gen. or later) equipped with Bluetooth® version 4.0 or later and the Camera Connect.

viCompatible with iPad models utilizing iOS 11 or later and equipped with at least 2GB of onboard RAM—specifically, iPad Pro (all models), iPad (5th generation), iPad (6th generation), iPad mini 4 and iPad Air 2.

*Availability, prices and specifications are subject to change without notice. Actual prices are set by individual dealers and may vary.

SOURCE Canon U.S.A., Inc.

Related Links

http://www.usa.canon.com

Canon EOS RP: second EOS R-series model confirmed

Canon has finally confirmed the much-leaked, highly anticipated EOS RP, the second full-frame camera in the company’s newest EOS R series.

The model arrives just five months after the launch of the EOS R, the first camera in the series.

Canon has finally confirmed the much-leaked, highly anticipated EOS RP, the second full-frame camera in the company’s newest EOS R series.

The model arrives just five months after the launch of the EOS R, the first camera in the series. Aimed at the more novice user looking to step up to full-frame photography, the model has the honor of being not only the smallest interchangeable-lens camera with a full-frame sensor to bear Canon’s branding, but with a weight of just 485g with a battery and memory card in place, it’s also the lightest by some margin.

Furthermore, with an asking price that’s less than half of the EOS R’s, it presents a more accessible option for budget-conscious users keen on adopting the EOS R system.

Canon EOS RP: features26.2MP full-frame CMOS sensor 4K video to 25p (Full HD to 60p) RF lens mount

The EOS RP brings together a 26.2MP full-frame sensor with the same RF lens mount that features on the EOS R. The sensor bears the same total and effective pixels as the one inside the EOS 6D Mark II DSLR, although Canon has said that the version here is slightly different (presumably to support 4K video recording).

The RF mount in front of the sensor accepts a limited number of lenses right now, although Canon has separately confirmed the development of further RF-series lenses that will shortly become available, which should bring the total number of native options to 10 by the end of the year.

In the meantime, users are also able to mount an exhaustive number of EF and EF-S lenses from Canon’s EOS DSLR stable via one of three EF-EOS R adapters, and the model will be made available with the most basic of these adapters as standard.

Image stabilization for stills is only available when using a lens with this technology in place, although an additional bonus of using such an optic is that the camera will provide information from the sensor to deliver better correction over blur, a previously-seen partnership known as Dual Sensing IS.

The EOS RP’s 26.2MP sensor provides a native sensitivity range of ISO100-40,000, although extension settings alongside boost this to settings equivalent to ISO50 at the lower end of the scale and ISO102,400 at the other extreme. Processing is handled by the same DIGIC 8 engine as the EOS R, while raw files can be recorded in the most recent CR3 format, which shaves 40% off the size of standard files.

This processing engine also allows the camera to record 4K footage to a maximum 25fps, as well as Full HD videos to 60fps. This is bolstered by 3.5mm ports for both headphones and microphones, together with a range of video-specific functionality, from 4K timelapse shooting and a Video Snapshot mode, through to Movie Servo AF and a five-axis Movie Digital IS option that provides (electronic) compensation over shaky footage.

The longstanding Digital Lens Optimiser correction feature is also on hand to help improve sharpness when capturing images at smaller apertures, as well as to offset the effects of the low-pass filter, and this can be used across RF and EF lenses registered to the camera.

Built-in Wi-Fi and Bluetooth, meanwhile, make it possible to operate the camera with a smart device using the Canon Connect App. This app also allows for GPS information to be embedded into images captured on the EOS RP, while a separate Canon DPP Express app can be used to import raw files for processing on smart devices.

Metering is handled by the main imaging sensor, with 384 separate zones used for measurement, and this provides the familiar evaluative, center-weighted average, spot and partial quartet of patterns. A silent shooting mode is also on hand, although this appears to mirror the option on the EOS M50 in being confined to a scene setting, rather than available as an option the can be called upon regardless of exposure mode. It’s not clear whether this will allow any extension to the shutter speed range allowed by the mechanical shutter, which has a maximum shutter speed of 1/4000sec.

Canon EOS RP: AF and burst shootingDual Pixel CMOS AF system AF working range down to -5EV 5fps burst shooting

Familiar focusing features on the EOS RP include Canon’s well-established Dual Pixel CMOS AF system, which uses phase-detect AF pixels on the main imaging sensor to perform autofocus. This system is also at the heart of face detection and Eye AF, the latter keeping a lock on the subject’s eye to ensure it remains in focus. Dual Pixel CMOS AF works for both stills and videos, although videos captured at a 4K resolution can only make use of contrast-detect AF.

It’s possible to call upon 4779 individual AF points, which cover 88% of the horizontal area and 100% of the vertical stretch. Spot AF, used for focusing on particularly small subjects, and focus bracketing for macro work can also be called upon where required.

Images can be captured continuously at a maximum rate of 5fps, although this drops to 4fps when shooting with Servo AF activated. Impressively, Canon claims that with a fast UHS-II memory card in place the camera will essentially provide an unlimited buffer, whether you’re capturing raw files or JPEGs.

Canon EOS RP: LCD screen and viewfinder0.39-inch OLED EVF, 2.36million dots 3-inch vari-angle touchscreen LCD, 1.04 million dots Touch-sensitive LCD panel

The EOS RP’s electronic viewfinder isn’t quite the same as the panel on the more senior EOS R, in that it’s been designed with a 2.36 million-dot OLED panel rather than the familiar 3.69 million-dot alternative. Likewise, its 0.39-inch size and 0.7x magnification should provide a smaller view than the EOS R’s 0.5-inch panel with its 0.76x magnification, although it does at least match it in providing approximately 100% coverage of the scene.

The viewfinder is joined by a 3-inch vari-angle LCD that can be pulled out and twisted to face in different directions, including all the way round to face the front. This screen is touch-sensitive, enabling the user to set the focusing point when composing images and videos through the LCD screen, although additional support for the Touch and Drag AF feature – whereby the user can swipe the screen with their thumb to the chosen point of focus while using the viewfinder – can also be used where necessary.

Touch sensitivity extends to other parts of the camera’s operation, such as swiping through and zooming into captured images, as well as for the adjustment of camera settings in the Quick menu, among other things.

Canon EOS RP: build and designMagnesium alloy chassis 440g (485g including battery and memory card) 250-shot battery life

Canon has designed the EOS RP’s body with magnesium alloy paneling for rigidity and lightness, with aluminum, polycarbonate resin and glass fibers used elsewhere. Reassuringly, seals on the inside provide protection against both dust and moisture, which isn’t something we always see on models aimed at more novice users.

In further good news, Canon has decided to drop the EOS R’s awkward M-Fn bar for this new model, while there’s a single card slot for SDHC and SDXC cards rated to UHS-I and UHS-II specifications on the side of the body. Disappointingly, the camera looks set to offer just a 250-shot battery life, which is relatively weak even for a mirrorless model.

Canon has also confirmed that it’s developing a new superzoom optic for the range, the RF 24-240mm f/4-6.3 IS USM, which combines a 10x optical zoom range with an Image Stabilizer. Aimed at the traveling photographer, it joins five other lenses set for release throughout 2019.

Canon EOS RP: price and release date

The EOS RP is set for release on February 27, with two configurations confirmed for the UK market.

As with the EOS R, it won’t be possible to buy the body on its own – instead, the most affordable option includes the body and the Mount Adapter EF-EOS R, which will be priced at $1299.99 in the US and £1,399.99 in the UK.

A kit that adds the 24-105mm f/4L IS USM lens on top of this, meanwhile, will retail for $2,399.99/£2,329.99 in the UK. Pricing in the Australia is yet to be confirmed.

Canon EOS RP: second EOS R-series model announced

Canon has finally confirmed the much-leaked, highly anticipated EOS RP, the second full-frame camera in the company’s newest EOS R series.

The model arrives just five months after the launch of the EOS R, the first camera in the series.

Canon has finally confirmed the much-leaked, highly anticipated EOS RP, the second full-frame camera in the company’s newest EOS R series.

The model arrives just five months after the launch of the EOS R, the first camera in the series. Aimed at the more novice user looking to step up to full-frame photography, the model has the honor of being not only the smallest interchangeable-lens camera with a full-frame sensor to bear Canon’s branding, but with a weight of just 485g with a battery and memory card in place, it’s also the lightest by some margin.

Furthermore, with an asking price that’s less than half of the EOS R’s, it presents a more accessible option for budget-conscious users keen on adopting the EOS R system.

Read our hands on review of the Canon EOS RPCanon EOS RP: features26.2MP full-frame CMOS sensor 4K video to 25p (Full HD to 60p) RF lens mount

The EOS RP brings together a 26.2MP full-frame sensor with the same RF lens mount that features on the EOS R. The sensor bears the same total and effective pixels as the one inside the EOS 6D Mark II DSLR, although Canon has said that the version here is slightly different (presumably to support 4K video recording).

The RF mount in front of the sensor accepts a limited number of lenses right now, although Canon has separately confirmed the development of further RF-series lenses that will shortly become available, which should bring the total number of native options to 10 by the end of the year.

In the meantime, users are also able to mount an exhaustive number of EF and EF-S lenses from Canon’s EOS DSLR stable via one of three EF-EOS R adapters, and the model will be made available with the most basic of these adapters as standard.

Image stabilization for stills is only available when using a lens with this technology in place, although an additional bonus of using such an optic is that the camera will provide information from the sensor to deliver better correction over blur, a previously-seen partnership known as Dual Sensing IS.

The EOS RP’s 26.2MP sensor provides a native sensitivity range of ISO100-40,000, although extension settings alongside boost this to settings equivalent to ISO50 at the lower end of the scale and ISO102,400 at the other extreme. Processing is handled by the same DIGIC 8 engine as the EOS R, while raw files can be recorded in the most recent CR3 format, which shaves 40% off the size of standard files.

This processing engine also allows the camera to record 4K footage to a maximum 25fps, as well as Full HD videos to 60fps. This is bolstered by 3.5mm ports for both headphones and microphones, together with a range of video-specific functionality, from 4K timelapse shooting and a Video Snapshot mode, through to Movie Servo AF and a five-axis Movie Digital IS option that provides (electronic) compensation over shaky footage.

The longstanding Digital Lens Optimiser correction feature is also on hand to help improve sharpness when capturing images at smaller apertures, as well as to offset the effects of the low-pass filter, and this can be used across RF and EF lenses registered to the camera.

Built-in Wi-Fi and Bluetooth, meanwhile, make it possible to operate the camera with a smart device using the Canon Connect App. This app also allows for GPS information to be embedded into images captured on the EOS RP, while a separate Canon DPP Express app can be used to import raw files for processing on smart devices.

Metering is handled by the main imaging sensor, with 384 separate zones used for measurement, and this provides the familiar evaluative, center-weighted average, spot and partial quartet of patterns. A silent shooting mode is also on hand, although this appears to mirror the option on the EOS M50 in being confined to a scene setting, rather than available as an option the can be called upon regardless of exposure mode. It’s not clear whether this will allow any extension to the shutter speed range allowed by the mechanical shutter, which has a maximum shutter speed of 1/4000sec.

Canon EOS RP: AF and burst shootingDual Pixel CMOS AF system AF working range down to -5EV 5fps burst shooting

Familiar focusing features on the EOS RP include Canon’s well-established Dual Pixel CMOS AF system, which uses phase-detect AF pixels on the main imaging sensor to perform autofocus. This system is also at the heart of face detection and Eye AF, the latter keeping a lock on the subject’s eye to ensure it remains in focus. Dual Pixel CMOS AF works for both stills and videos, although videos captured at a 4K resolution can only make use of contrast-detect AF.

It’s possible to call upon 4779 individual AF points, which cover 88% of the horizontal area and 100% of the vertical stretch. Spot AF, used for focusing on particularly small subjects, and focus bracketing for macro work can also be called upon where required.

Images can be captured continuously at a maximum rate of 5fps, although this drops to 4fps when shooting with Servo AF activated. Impressively, Canon claims that with a fast UHS-II memory card in place the camera will essentially provide an unlimited buffer, whether you’re capturing raw files or JPEGs.

Canon EOS RP: LCD screen and viewfinder0.39-inch OLED EVF, 2.36million dots 3-inch vari-angle touchscreen LCD, 1.04 million dots Touch-sensitive LCD panel

The EOS RP’s electronic viewfinder isn’t quite the same as the panel on the more senior EOS R, in that it’s been designed with a 2.36 million-dot OLED panel rather than the familiar 3.69 million-dot alternative. Likewise, its 0.39-inch size and 0.7x magnification should provide a smaller view than the EOS R’s 0.5-inch panel with its 0.76x magnification, although it does at least match it in providing approximately 100% coverage of the scene.

The viewfinder is joined by a 3-inch vari-angle LCD that can be pulled out and twisted to face in different directions, including all the way round to face the front. This screen is touch-sensitive, enabling the user to set the focusing point when composing images and videos through the LCD screen, although additional support for the Touch and Drag AF feature – whereby the user can swipe the screen with their thumb to the chosen point of focus while using the viewfinder – can also be used where necessary.

Touch sensitivity extends to other parts of the camera’s operation, such as swiping through and zooming into captured images, as well as for the adjustment of camera settings in the Quick menu, among other things.

Canon EOS RP: build and designMagnesium alloy chassis 440g (485g including battery and memory card) 250-shot battery life

Canon has designed the EOS RP’s body with magnesium alloy paneling for rigidity and lightness, with aluminum, polycarbonate resin and glass fibers used elsewhere. Reassuringly, seals on the inside provide protection against both dust and moisture, which isn’t something we always see on models aimed at more novice users.

In further good news, Canon has decided to drop the EOS R’s awkward M-Fn bar for this new model, while there’s a single card slot for SDHC and SDXC cards rated to UHS-I and UHS-II specifications on the side of the body. Disappointingly, the camera looks set to offer just a 250-shot battery life, which is relatively weak even for a mirrorless model.

Canon has also confirmed that it’s developing a new superzoom optic for the range, the RF 24-240mm f/4-6.3 IS USM, which combines a 10x optical zoom range with an Image Stabilizer. Aimed at the traveling photographer, it joins five other lenses set for release throughout 2019.

Canon EOS RP: price and release date

The EOS RP is set for release on February 27, with three configurations confirmed, although availability of these varies by region.

As with the EOS R, it won’t be possible to buy the body on its own in the US and UK – instead, the most affordable option includes the body and the Mount Adapter EF-EOS R, which will be priced at $1299.99 / £1,399.99.

Curiously, Australia does get a body-only option, which is priced at AU$2,099, while the Mount Adapter bundle ups the cost slightly to AU$2,149.

A kit that adds the 24-105mm f/4L IS USM lens on top of this, meanwhile, will retail for $2,399.99 in the US and £2,329.99 in the UK. Australian pricing and availability for the latter kit is still TBC.