How do home security systems handle your privacy? – CNET

If you saw my recent post on the best home security systems CNET has tested, then you know that you’ve got more options than ever these days. Upstart DIY systems like SimpliSafe, Abode, Ring Alarm and Nest Secure have given established powerhouses like ADT some dynamic new competition.

If you saw my recent post on the best home security systems CNET has tested, then you know that you’ve got more options than ever these days. Upstart DIY systems like SimpliSafe, Abode, Ring Alarm and Nest Secure have given established powerhouses like ADT some dynamic new competition. Meanwhile, more and more homeowners are choosing to monitor their homes on their own via video doorbell.

All of these systems rely on wireless transmissions within your home and to the cloud, too — so what steps are these companies taking to keep those signals secure? And what about all of those video clips ($189 at Walmart) — how do these companies handle the footage, and what steps do they take to protect user privacy?

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Those were the questions I asked six of the top systems we’ve written about. Specifically, I was interested in knowing what sort of encryption practices each system uses, as well as any measures each company takes to keep user data — mainly the saved video clips from their cameras — private.

I also asked each company about their apps — can you enable two-factor authentication to help keep someone from brute-forcing their way into your account? What about Face ID and Touch ID for iOS users?

Security providers can be understandably reluctant to detail their internal practices and the ways in which they keep their systems secure. The last thing they want is to provide bad guys with a precise view of what they’d be going up against were they ever to try and hack into the system. Still, some were willing to share their specific encryption standards (most employ Transport Layer Security, or TLS, which is the same standard used to encrypt much of the web). Others preferred to talk about their methodology in more general terms, such as SimpliSafe describing its encryption as “industry standard.”

More interesting might be each company’s policies for handling user video clips, which is less a question of security than one of privacy. Some companies simply store the clips for the user and delete them after a set period of time. Others follow procedures that allow them to view and analyze user clips in order to improve features like motion detection and facial recognition. That includes Ring, which didn’t specify how long it hangs on to those clips.

I’ve done my best to parse through all of it and summarize the responses in the table above. Below, you’ll find the exact, word-for-word responses that I received from spokespersons for each company:

Abode

1. How does Abode handle user camera footage? What practices are in place to help ensure privacy?

Video data is only kept within the Abode system for as long as the customer’s plan dictates. Free customers have access to three days of timeline, Connect customers have access to 14-days of timeline and Secure customers have access to 90-days of timeline. Video footage that is stored by the customer on Abode servers is kept secure and encrypted and not accessible to support staff or management. Abode does not share video data or any personal data with any third-party companies.

In the event of an alarm, if a customer has a camera enrolled within their Abode system and professional monitoring, video is sent to the central monitoring center to verify the alarm and if needed, dispatch the appropriate authorities. The moment that alarm is analyzed (dispatch vs. no dispatch) connection to video is severed and the CMC no longer has access to video or a customer’s live video feeds.

2. What steps does Abode take to prevent someone from hacking into the system, or from jamming it? What sort of encryption does Abode use?

The Abode gateway is constantly checking communications to the deployed wireless devices for gradual interference and if that is purposely being interfered with. Whenever a signal jamming period lasts longer than 30 seconds, a “Jamming” notification will be sent to the users and reported to the Central Monitoring Center where jamming operating procedures take place.

For data at rest, like video storage, Abode uses AES 256 encryption.

3. How does Abode keep the app controls secure? If someone wants to reinforce their login with two-factor authentication or another added security measure, is that an option?

Abode offers users the option to secure their account through two-factor authentication. Two-factor authentication adds additional security to your Abode home by requiring a code generated by the Google Authenticator App on your phone when logging in from a new device. For complete security, enable two-factor authentication for each user account that has access to your Abode system in your home. Customers can find additional information on two-factor authentication for their Abode home here. Additionally, Abode supports Touch ID and Face ID from Apple on the iOS app which adds extra security with additional convenience.

ADT

1. How does ADT handle each user’s camera footage? What practices are in place to help ensure privacy?

ADT is a proponent of Security and Privacy by Design principles, and our systems limit ADT’s ability to access our residential customer’s video footage, such as when needed to service a system for a customer. By policy, and through technical restrictions, this footage can only be accessed once specific protocols are followed, and use of those protocols is logged. Customers are also notified whenever designated ADT personnel have been authorized to access their system.

2. What steps does ADT take to prevent someone from hacking into the system, or from jamming it? What sort of encryption does ADT use?

ADT works closely with our product and technology partners to employ industry best practices to help minimize the risk of hacking for the intrusion prevention devices that we use, and we regularly conduct penetration testing of these products, as well as our own internal systems, to help minimize the risk of vulnerability exposure. While jamming is a potential issue for radio devices generally, ADT systems monitor for loss of connectivity with wireless devices and can report that to the customer.

ADT has also implemented two-way encrypted communications for sensors in the new ADT Command panel that allows for both secure communications, and awareness when a sensor has lost contact with the panel.

3. How does ADT keep the app controls secure? If someone wants to reinforce their login with two-factor authentication or another added security measure, is that an option?

ADT’s customer apps for their interactive security systems are secured using username and password, with Touch ID and Face ID options, if they are supported on the customer’s mobile device. Two-factor authentication is also supported on the new ADT Control application — now generally available across the United States. The Control application also allows access to be disabled remotely, if a customer loses their phone. All application access is logged, and available for the customer to review.

Comcast Xfinity Home

1. How does Comcast handle user camera footage? What practices are in place to help ensure privacy?

We have a team at Comcast dedicated specifically to camera security. We only activate video recording when customers opt-in and choose the service. We retain video files for customers with 24/7 Video Recording for 10 days on an encrypted server and then delete them. We retain video clips from Xfinity Home customers with rules-based video files for 30 days and then delete them. Customers can also choose to save their security camera files locally on their own devices. We do not use the recordings for marketing purposes or analyze them in any way.

2. What steps does Comcast take to prevent someone from hacking into Xfinity Home setups, or from jamming their signals? What sort of encryption does Comcast use?

We build security into our products from the design phase to the end of their life cycle. Our product security practices include routine security audits, 24/7 monitoring and penetration testing. We also work with the security research community to identify and resolve issues that may impact customers. RF signal jamming detection is built into our hardware and paired with algorithms running at all times to detect jamming attempts and report it to our backend systems. We meet or exceed industry standards for jamming detection in residential home security systems.

While the encryption we use varies by product and service, our security approach centers on widely adopted, standards-based encryption technologies. These include Transport Layer Security (TLS), certificate validation, field-level encryption for information stored in databases, on-disk encryption for any stored information and multi-factor authentication.

3. How does Comcast keep its app controls secure? If someone wants to reinforce their login with two-factor authentication or another added security measure, is that an option?

No user credentials are ever stored on the Xfinity Home mobile app. We also offer multifactor authentication for Xfinity Home and a number of other Xfinity products and services. Customers can find information about how to sign up for multifactor authentication here.

Nest

1. How does Nest handle user camera footage? What practices are in place to help ensure privacy?

Nest uses TLS to protect the transport of data from the camera to the Cloud. The video is encrypted at rest when stored in the Cloud. AES 256-bit encryption is used to encrypt the data.

Privacy or security sensitive actions, such as viewing video and audio content generated by customer usage of Nest products, always require permission/authenticated access authorized by the device owners.

2. What steps does Nest take to prevent someone from hacking into Nest Secure security systems and Nest Hello ($229 at Crate and Barrel) video doorbells, or from jamming their signals? What sort of encryption does Nest use?

At Nest, we design our products with security in mind — from the hardware components we use, to software and account level controls we provide to our users. Prior to release, Nest products undergo a rigorous security testing process where we identify and remediate security vulnerabilities that would impact the reliability of the Nest platform and the security of customer data.

Nest products require authenticated access to perform functions that change the configuration of the device after initial setup. No default credentials exist for configuration or setup functionality that could be reused from device to device.Nest products leverage industry-standard encryption technology to protect data in transit over the internet. Data from your devices, such as video and audio content, that is stored in Google’s infrastructure is encrypted at rest.

The information that passes between Nest Detect sensors and Nest Guard is encrypted at multiple levels, including encryption during transmission, additional encryption that’s specific to the home the products are in, and encryption between our products and the cloud.

When security vulnerabilities are identified in a Nest product that has been released, we will remotely update the product to fix the issue as soon as possible. Nest uses embedded security measures such as code signing to validate software updates running on our devices to mitigate against device compromise.

Nest, in coordination with the Google bug bounty program, offers a bug bounty program to search for and address vulnerabilities. We also work with well-known and reputable security companies to conduct independent third party security audits of our products and services.

Nest Secure can detect jamming attacks and will alert customers if it senses an attack. Also, because Nest Detects don’t use Wi-Fi to communicate with the Nest Guard, even if your home Wi-Fi goes down, the Detects can still tell Guard to sound the alarm in the event of a break-in.

3. How does Nest keep its app controls secure? If someone wants to reinforce their login with two-factor authentication or another added security measure, is that an option?

Nest offers two-step verification, which helps prevent someone from signing into your account in the Nest app without your permission. With two-step verification your phone helps prove your identity any time you sign into your account or make other changes to security settings.

Ring

1. How does Ring handle user camera footage? What practices are in place to help ensure privacy?

We take the privacy and security of our customers’ personal information extremely seriously. In order to improve our service, we view and annotate certain Ring video recordings. These recordings are sourced exclusively from publicly shared Ring videos from the Neighbors app (in accordance with our terms of service), and from a small fraction of Ring users who have provided their explicit written consent to allow us to access and utilize their videos for such purposes. Ring employees do not have access to livestreams from Ring products.

We have strict policies in place for all our team members. We implement systems to restrict and audit access to information. We hold our team members to a high ethical standard and anyone in violation of our policies faces discipline, including termination and potential legal and criminal penalties. In addition, we have zero tolerance for abuse of our systems and if we find bad actors who have engaged in this behavior, we will take swift action against them.

2. What steps does Ring take to prevent someone from hacking into Ring Alarm and Ring Video Doorbell setups, or from jamming their signals? What sort of encryption does Ring use?

We have taken measures to make Ring devices secure. These include disallowing third party application installation on the device, rigorous security reviews, secure software development requirements and encryption of communication between Ring devices with other Amazon services such as AWS servers.

We understand the importance of keeping data secure and follow industry standards when it comes to encryption protection. We use a combination of AES encryption (Advanced Encryption Standard) and TLS (Transport Layer Security). We also encrypt the data between Ring Doorbells and Cams using AES encryption, TLS, and SRTP (Secure Real Time Protocol).

As a security company, security is at the core of Ring’s mission and drives everything we do. Ring dedicates significant time and money to product and network security. We have an in-house team that is constantly working to ensure Ring products are secure; we also work with several outside firms to perform security testing on all devices. In order to maintain your device’s security, we recommend keeping your firmware up-to-date and using strong, unique passwords for both your Wi-Fi network and device account.

3. How does Ring keep its app controls secure? If someone wants to reinforce their login with two-factor authentication or another added security measure, is that an option?

Two-factor authentication is currently rolling out to customers and will be available to all users soon. Ring values the trust our neighbors place in us and we are committed to the highest level of customer information and data security. As we continually work to make our devices and services more useful and secure for our users, we are actively developing new security features and capabilities, including the ability to reject comprised passwords.

SimpliSafe

1. How does SimpliSafe handle user camera footage? What practices are in place to help ensure privacy?

Our cameras are designed with privacy in mind at all steps:

All of our indoor cameras have a built-in privacy shutter. Customers can open or close it whenever they want, from the app. We are actually the only security company that does this.All communication between the base station, the app and our indoor and outdoor cameras—whether it happens via Wi-Fi or via cellular signal—is encrypted.All video storage is totally opt-in. Customers who want their cameras to record video (rather than just live-streaming to the SimpliSafe app) choose to do that, and subscribe to recording services that enable this feature.Even then, recordings only happen when the camera is triggered (by movement, or by the system being otherwise triggered, armed or disarmed). Those videos are stored on a secure server for 30 days. Only ~10 of our engineers have access to the server. Even those employees are not able to view videos as stored, due to a proprietary storage method we developed. All of these recordings are deleted after 30 days.

2. What steps does SimpliSafe take to prevent someone from hacking into the system, or from jamming it? What sort of encryption does SimpliSafe use?

We adhere to industry standard encryption methods. Sensor communication with the Base Station is encrypted, as is communication from the Base Station to back-end servers. We have jam detection in place to prevent jamming.

3. How does SimpliSafe keep the app controls secure? If someone wants to reinforce their login with two-factor authentication or another added security measure, is that an option?

Two-factor authentication is currently in the works, and will be offered to customers on an opt-in basis. Same with notification systems around new IP addresses and devices, so that if you log in from an unrecognized device and/or location you will be notified.

Users can already see any mobile devices that are logged in on the web platform, and force log-out any of them.


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Huawei Unveils AirEngine as New Wi-Fi Brand and Announces Global Mass-Market Deployment of Its Wi-Fi 6 Products

SHENZHEN, China, April 19, 2019 /PRNewswire/ — At the Huawei Global Analyst Summit 2019, Huawei and Wi-Fi Alliance (WFA) held a media roundtable meeting with the theme of “Wi-Fi 6, Unlocking Business Value.

SHENZHEN, China, April 19, 2019 /PRNewswire/ — At the Huawei Global Analyst Summit 2019, Huawei and Wi-Fi Alliance (WFA) held a media roundtable meeting with the theme of “Wi-Fi 6, Unlocking Business Value.” At the media roundtable, Huawei announced AirEngine as its new Wi-Fi brand, which will be applied to its full series of enterprise-class Wi-Fi 6 products. Additionally, with global media and analysts present onsite, Huawei highlighted that its Wi-Fi 6 products have been deployed on a large scale in five major regions worldwide.

Emerging applications such as Virtual Reality (VR), Augmented Reality (AR), and 4K require more bandwidth, higher concurrency, and lower latency, which poses challenges to traditional Wi-Fi networks. These challenges must be resolved as quickly as possible during enterprises’ digital transformation. That’s where Huawei’s AirEngine comes in. AirEngine is proof of Huawei’s commitment to high-quality Wi-Fi networks. It serves as a wireless connection engine that accelerates the digital transformation of enterprise services.

Three compelling benefits make AirEngine stand out: ultra-high performance, optimal user experience, and enablement of new business. AirEngine features the industry’s best performance, as verified by Tolly, an influential international testing organization. AirEngine builds on technical strengths originating from Huawei 5G smart antenna technology and intelligent application acceleration technologies, and achieves intelligent optimization for optimal user experience and service continuity. AirEngine can also accommodate new applications such as 4K and VR, and leverage in-depth cooperation with partners to achieve wireless transformation for teaching, research, manufacturing, and other mission-critical services, enabling new business.

“With unmatched technical strengths, Huawei AirEngine enables wireless networks to efficiently and reliably carry traditional wired network services. Typical benefits include smooth VR/AR teaching in education, 4K high-definition conferences and wireless offices for enterprises, as well as packet loss-free Automated Guided Vehicles (AGVs) in industrial manufacturing environments. Huawei AirEngine will accelerate digital transformation of enterprises across various industries,” said Zhao Zhipeng, President of Campus Network Domain of Huawei Data Communication Product Line. “Huawei, a leading contributor to the Wi-Fi 6 standard, has been actively promoting the development of the entire industry. Huawei is the first vendor to release commercial Wi-Fi 6 products. Currently, our Wi-Fi 6 APs have been deployed in five major regions around the world.”

At the media roundtable, Kevin Robinson, Vice President of Marketing for WFA, shared the latest Wi-Fi 6 industry developments and forecasts and gave insightful ideas about the impact of Wi-Fi 6 on enterprises’ digital transformation. He stated: “We appreciate Huawei’s great contributions to the development of Wi-Fi 6, from standards and prototypes all the way to commercial use. WFA believes that 2019 will be the year of Wi-Fi 6 commercial use, and it will launch a Wi-Fi 6 certification program in the third quarter of 2019.”

AirEngine is specifically designed for the building of leading high-quality Wi-Fi networks that feature high-performance connections, optimal user experience, and enablement of new business. Huawei and partners will collaborate closely to provide ubiquitous connectivity and pervasive intelligence for government and enterprise customers. In addition, Huawei will continue to use the Digital Platform to integrate new ICT, helping customers to navigate digital transformation.

About Huawei

Huawei is a leading global provider of information and communications technology (ICT) infrastructure and smart devices. With integrated solutions across four key domains – telecom networks, IT, smart devices, and cloud services – we are committed to bringing digital to every person, home, and organization for a fully connected, intelligent world.

Huawei’s end-to-end portfolio of products, solutions, and services are both competitive and secure. Through open collaboration with ecosystem partners, we create lasting value for our customers, working to empower people, enrich home life, and inspire innovation in organizations of all shapes and sizes.

At Huawei, innovation focuses on customer needs. We invest heavily in basic research, concentrating on technological breakthroughs that drive the world forward. We have more than 180,000 employees, and we operate in more than 170 countries and regions. Founded in 1987, Huawei is a private company fully owned by its employees.

For more information, please visit Huawei online at www.huawei.com or follow us on:
http://www.linkedin.com/company/Huawei
http://www.twitter.com/Huawei
http://www.facebook.com/Huawei
http://www.youtube.com/Huawei

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Galaxy Fold fragile screens and more: The good and bad of Samsung’s new foldable phone – CNET

Life with the Galaxy Fold took a turn on Wednesday as four of my fellow reviewers experienced bulging, flickering and malfunctioning screens. Although my particular review unit seems to be unaffected, the incident has cast doubt on the Fold’s daring new bendable design.

Life with the Galaxy Fold took a turn on Wednesday as four of my fellow reviewers experienced bulging, flickering and malfunctioning screens. Although my particular review unit seems to be unaffected, the incident has cast doubt on the Fold’s daring new bendable design.

Let me start by telling you what I know about the review units before sharing how the device works. The Galaxy Fold goes on sale April 26 for $1,980, and Samsung handed out review units on Monday, April 15 so reviewers could get the word out the day preorders officially began. That’s a common practice, and so is delivering early production devices into reviewers’ hands.

These handsets are usually one of the first run, but not meant for retail sales. They may not have completely final hardware or software, which means that reviewers may experience bugs or irregularities. If that happens, reviewers usually alert the company. In this case, Samsung told me that our version of the Fold is the unlocked model for the European market. US services like Samsung Pay, Bixby and Samsung Health won’t work on it, and calling might be subpar because these particular Folds aren’t optimized for US carriers. Fair enough.

The phone “is manufactured with a special protective layer,” to cover the plastic Infinity Flex display, Samsung said earlier this week. “It is not a screen protector – do not attempt to remove it.”

Because of the Fold’s early production status and these screen incidents, CNET will hold our Galaxy Fold rating until the final production unit we purchased arrives. Until then, I’ll continue to share my wins and losses with the Fold here.

Read: Why Galaxy Fold screens are having a meltdown and what you should do if you bought one

How my screen’s holding up

I’m at Day 4 with the Galaxy Fold and thankfully no screen meltdowns so far. There is one wrinkle I noticed earlier today. More accurately, it’s a dent, a tiny one on the left side of the display.

The screen is made from plastic, not glass (because we don’t have bendable glass yet), which means the cover material doesn’t have the same hardness as Gorilla Glass.


We went hands-on with the Galaxy Fold, and here it is
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It’s likely that something vicious in my purse marked up the screen when I tossed the Fold in open to finish a benchmarking test while deboarding the train — it’s really designed to be closed when you’re not actively using it, but I didn’t really want to stop the benchmarking test. It’s a pretty tiny divot — I’m not even really sure when it happened — but it does speak to the fragility of this type of newborn design.

Where we are as of Thursday, April 18

My thoughts on Samsung’s almost-$2,000 Galaxy Fold are taking shape. However, they’re still far from set, and now I’m keeping a watchful eye on potential screen issues.

I’m definitely getting the hang of navigating the three active windows, and getting used to typing and taking photos with such a large screen. It’s great how natural it’s feeling to snap the phone closed to stash in a pocket or purse, and open up again to do more.

I’ve passed the Galaxy Fold around to a lot of coworkers and friends in my time with it so far. I love watching their faces — the act of bending and unbending the screen is such an “aha!” moment. For me, the first thing I noticed was its weight as I lifted the Fold off its stand. I appreciated the heft of it and the smooth, glossy glass backing. And the first time you bend it in half.

The Fold is a phone you have to understand on a physical level that words and photos don’t do justice. You have to feel how much force you need to throw into it to close the device and open it again. To gauge the smoothness of that big hinge as the “wings” open and close. It isn’t hard, but you do need to be deliberate, and I like the little bit of exertion the Fold demands from you.

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It may have a large notch along with its plastic interior screen and bezel (not my favorite things), but overall the Fold still feels like a premium, cohesive device that’s building a case for why it exists apart from the novelty. So far, I’ve used the Galaxy Fold on a very crowded subway, in a cab, on the train, in a car, walking down the street, sitting at a cafe and on an airplane. There are things that work and things that don’t.

I’ve read the news, Tweeted, Slacked, emailed, taken photos and watched Netflix and YouTube videos. I’m not totally thrilled by some of Samsung’s design decisions — like a too-small virtual keyboard on the outside and a cumbersome one on the inside — and I’m still waiting to see how certain features will pan out.

But I love that I can actually zip the Fold into the pocket of a short-waisted, fitted leather jacket, and that when I’ve finished a session of use, I can simply close it up with a snap and stash it away. Opening and closing the Fold still feels a little special, but I was surprised at how quickly that’s becoming second nature.

Foldable phones are an insane idea, not because the phone itself bends, but because the screen does.

Although I’m excited to be exploring the Galaxy Fold, I’m not blind to questions about its durability and usability. But at this point, the novelty of learning a completely different type of device is still intoxicating. Remember, the Fold is a first-generation device. There are bound to be issues as Samsung and the industry hammer out what works and what doesn’t. Samsung knows that the Fold is a luxury device that will become a status symbol for early adopters. What none of us knows is how long foldable phones will last — fad or future?

Read: How to buy the Galaxy Fold

Foldable phones are an insane idea, not because the phone itself bends, but because the screen does. That’s a hard trick to pull off and even harder to do well — I’ll eventually let you know if this one manages it. A few years ago, a foldable phone sounded like a futuristic joke: We can’t stop our regular glass phone screens from breaking, and now you want to bend them?

But now there’s enough critical mass, thanks to phone-makers like Samsung, Huawei with the Mate X and TCL, that foldable phones are becoming more real every day. Even Google’s in on the action, pledging Android support so that its software will switch from one screen orientation to another as you fold and unfold the display. A little-known company sold the first foldable phone, the Royole FlexPai, but Samsung’s Fold is the first “real” foldable phone for most people.

Foldable phones will start off as ultra-expensive — the 4G version of the Fold starts at $1,980, and the Mate X costs about $2,600 — and there may be kinks to work out. (UK and Australian prices are TBA, but $1,980 converts to about £1,500 or AU$2,750.) But if enough people clamor for a device that puts a big screen in a little body, then a foldable phone design has the chance to change the way people use their phones: multitasking, interacting with the device and possibly even making other devices, like tablets, obsolete. I’ve said it before: foldable phones are the wild west.

Now playing:Watch this: Epic Galaxy Fold unboxing: Samsung makes it count
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I’m starting my review period in earnest and will update this frequently along the way. Come back for more observations!

When the Galaxy Fold is closed…

You can use the Galaxy Fold closed like a book or open like a tablet, but Samsung has clearly designed the Fold to be used open most of the time, and closed when you just want to do or check on something quickly. Closed, it’s tall and narrow, and the 4.6-inch exterior display feels small.

The Galaxy Fold’s screen sits in the middle of the body, surrounded on all sides by thick bezels, if you want to call them that. This design gives the screen the impression of being even smaller than it is. The alternative, I suppose, would be to have an even taller screen, which might present some of its own challenges formatting common apps.

Closed is how the phone feels its most solid and sturdy (though you do get a two-part case in the box). Its weight and smooth, glass finish lend a certain gravitas. Samsung even tries to dress up the hinge by allowing you to customize with a gold or silver color if you’re buying the phone in green or blue.

The Fold’s hinge moves smoothly, but a large mechanism here also makes the width of the phone’s “wings” quite narrow. Closed, it looks like a sandwich. On the right side, there’s a volume rocker and a power button, and the fingerprint reader doubles as the Bixby button. I’ve accidentally pressed it a couple times already.

I will say, when it’s folded up, it feels a bit like a flip phone or older candybar phone, and is pretty convenient for placing calls. It’s less convenient to launch the camera by double-pressing the power button, or unlocking the phone when it’s folded up, because those buttons are on the second camel hump when the Fold is closed, so you have to reach across one layer to press them. That leads to inaccuracy.

Using apps in closed position

When it comes to the real business of a phone — using apps — the more compact configuration is a bit more of a challenge. Although the Fold’s screen is much smaller than any phone you’re used to, you can still access all your installed apps. Samsung preloads a large clock widget, which you can tap to get into your clock app (handy for setting an alarm), and you can change this widget up if you’d like.

There’s also the Google Search bar, and space for three app icons. You can make folders, so that helps put more on the page, and of course there are multiple home screens, so you can quickly get to your apps. The app tray is also easy to invoke by swiping up from the bottom, as you would on other phones.

Font size and icons are both miniaturized, which feels like a throwback to the days when we all hunched over our phone screens hunting and pecking our way through. As I tried responding to Tweets and messages while on the go, it became clearer and clearer that this screen, and its virtual keyboard, are too small to be really useful. I can almost type accurately when I’m immobile, but once I started walking or being bounced by a train or bus, the mistakes grew to the point of being unreadable.

Maybe it’s be easier to type on the 4.6-inch screen if the Samsung keyboard supported tracing. I could switch to Gboard, the virtual keyboard I prefer, but then I’d lose the split-screen keyboard when I open the Fold. I scoured the settings and it doesn’t look like you can use different inputs on the front and interior screens the way you can set different wallpapers.

My solution was to use voice input, but Samsung’s default software only mangled my words more. I was able to turn it off in the settings, which fell back to Google’s voice input, my preference all along. That helped tremendously.

I have smaller fingers, so it this was hard for me, it’s certain you’ll struggle if you’re blessed with girthier digits. I’d definitely rly on Google Voice or Bixby to do certain things, like place a call, search for store hours or turn Wi-Fi on and off.

The one thing I will say is that the Fold is easy to use one-handed when folded up, especially if all you want to do is follow map navigation or snap a quick photo.

When you open the Fold…

Samsung expects you to unfold the device to its full 7.3-inch glory when you want to fine-tune your photos and compose longer messages.

When you do open the Fold, any app you have open on the outside will also unfurl on the inside. This is called App Continuity, and it’s something that Samsung and Google worked on together to make sure that the fold doesn’t experience lag.

So far this works as expected, without delay. But if you want the app on the inside screen to follow you to the smaller exterior one, you’ll need to select those apps in the Display settings. This is because you may not want every app to dog your heels — you might decide that, for most apps, closing the phone means closing out what you’re doing.

Right now, WhatsApp, Microsoft, Spotify, Amazon Prime Video, Samsung and Google apps have all been optimized to use the design. If the app doesn’t support app continuity, it still works, but you’ll need to resize the app for full-screen — otherwise you’ll see black bars on either side.

But back to the small screen. Start typing something in this folded-up view, say an email, and you’ll notice that Samsung splits the keyboard to make typing more comfortable on the larger screen. I’m not the world’s biggest fan of the Samsung keyboard (this may be an understatement), and it’s irksome that you can’t trace to type in split screen mode. I’m sure that third-party virtual keyboard replacements will rise to the challenge.

For now, I’m going to stick with the default to see if I can improve my typing speed. I’m already getting faster, though I can’t tell if my fingers are sore from all the overwork testing and writing up the Fold, or if stretching my hands out to type is starting to take its toll.

There’s an art to using three apps at once

Multitasking is one of the Fold’s biggest selling points. Being able to use up to three apps at the same time is, after all, one advantage of using a larger screen. But multi-active windows, as it’s called, is still something I’m still learning. It’s complicated and a little confusing, but bear with me and I’ll do my best to explain it.

Most of the time, you’ll open an app the way you normally would, either by tapping the icon on your home screen, picking it from your Recents tab, or swiping up from the bottom to select from the app tray. Now say you want to chat with someone while you’re playing YouTube videos. You swipe from the right side of the screen (where the edge display is on other Galaxy phones) and launch an app that way.

You’ll notice that opening the second app scooches the first one over to the left so the second one can load as a tall, narrow panel. Then, if you add a third app (same way you add a second), the secondary panel divides in half to make room for the third panel. You can slightly resize these windows, close them out, and drag and drop to reposition them using blue “handles” at the top of the app. For example, if you want your third app to become your main window, you can drag it over into that position.

I noticed right away that the more apps you have open, the smaller the font, so you may not really want to use all three at once all the time. But if you want to quickly open the calculator while you’re reading a news story, you don’t have to stop what you’re doing to switch focus. You can also turn the phone to landscape mode to change the orientation, which makes the windows wider and shorter.

To load an app on the main window, you swipe up to access the app tray. To open an app on one of the other windows, you flick from the app tray on the right and launch an app that way. One more pro tip: You can also build out your multiwindow screen by dragging and dropping icons from the Recents tab.

Everything I just described happens in a perfect world, but there are limitations. Some apps you’ll never have the option to open as secondary or tertiary panels, and that really sucks. I’m hoping Samsung will work with top app developers to make this happen.

Interestingly, I noticed that some apps might open not as a panel, but as a pop-up (see my embedded Tweet above). In this case, I opened Netflix to start a download, and then opened Google Drive to find a file while I waited. I had expected Drive to open as a panel, and was surprised to see it as a window in a window, a lot like the picture-in-picture view that lets you see Google Maps navigation as a thumbnail while focusing on something else entirely. I expanded the pop-up and moved it around using the same “handles.”

Speaking of the Netflix download (two episodes of the British period spy drama Traitors), the image doesn’t naturally fill the screen and I didn’t see an onscreen control to expand it — just black bars on the top and bottom. Samsung will definitely want to work with Netflix on formatting, because this is not an ideal arrangement. You can force the app to expand if you dig around in the display settings, but that didn’t change anything for Netflix.

What about the air gap? The notch? The crease?!

Three design decisions are causing quite a stir. Let’s define some terms.

Air gap: The opening closest to the Galaxy Fold’s hinge where the two halves of the phone don’t touch when closing.

Notch: The roughly inch-long cutout on the right side of the 7.3-inch display, which houses two cameras and some sensors.

Crease: This is the seam in the Galaxy Fold’s plastic Infinity Flex display, which exists because the screen folds in on itself. Foldable screens with outward bends have an obvious ridge, too.

Now, how do I feel about them all? The air gap is smaller than I feared it would be, and while it’s noticeable, it doesn’t stand out. The Fold’s two edges clack magnetically and securely in place, so you’re not getting much stuck in this space. However, I could easily slip in a credit card. Then I slipped in another, which mostly held because of the tension created by the magnets.

The notch looks…pretty ridiculous, and unnecessarily large. But notch hatred and the necessity for notches are two sides of the same coin, a problem that every phone maker is trying to solve: how to get you more screen. Samsung could easily get rid of the notch if it made its bezel uniformly thick across the top, but then you’d get a smaller screen or a larger device to compensate.

Or, there’s the Huawei Mate X’s approach (video), which is to create a big curve and a handle that houses four camera sensors that you use for front and back, but even that design will come with trade-offs (like a rigid portion and two uneven screen halves.

And if you hate the notch enough, you can artificially black out part of the screen using some display settings (Display > Full-screen apps > Advanced settings > Hide camera cutout).

The notch does stick out like a sore thumb when watching Netflix movies. In other apps, like YouTube and games like Riptide Renegade, the screen in line with the notch blacks out to create wider bars on either side. You don’t notice the notch so much, but you also don’t get the full-screen experience.

Now, let’s talk about that crease. Yes, it’s there, and it’s visible for the simple and enduring reason that foldable phones have screens that bend in half. Until we find a material that fluidly self-heals when bending and unbending, we’re going to have to put up with some amount of creasing.

So far it’s not egregiously noticeable. When I press down on the 7.3-inch screen when the Fold is opened, I can feel the hinge mechanism underneath, but I don’t really feel it if I’m swiping lightly. We’ll have to see how this interferes — or not — as I use the phone over time.

The deal with the Fold’s six cameras

The Galaxy Fold has a total of six cameras: three on the back, one on the front and two inside. It also has that big notch when you unfold the phone. You’ll see that the two interior lenses are centered on a black bar (the notch) that extends to the right. Samsung says this is where it’s put the RGB and proximity sensors.

While you can snap shots using the 4.6-inch screen, Samsung expects you to use the Fold unfolded to take most photos, because you’ll be able to better adjust the blur and settings that way. I don’t love holding the Fold up like a tablet to take my photos. I make fun of those people (sorry, people). Now I will become one of those people. Still, I’ll keep an open mind during this testing phase.

4.6-inch screen (cover camera):

10-megapixel camera for quick shots and selfies

7.3-inch screen:

10-megapixel camera8-megapixel RGB depth sensor

Rear cameras:

12-megapixel main camera16-megapixel ultra-wide angle12-megapixel telephoto lens

Taking photos while the Fold is closed up is workable, but not awesome because it’s really hard to tell if your photo is in focus, and it’s much harder to move tiny sliders for Live Focus (portrait) shots. But if you’re honestly taking a quick pic, or don’t want to draw attention to yourself by unfolding the Fold, then it’s totally fine. You can either share the photo right away, or open the Fold for fine-tuning.

It’s a lot easier to take selfies from the closed position than from the open position, and it’s also more private — you don’t have everyone and their dog watching you check your teeth on your 7.3-inch screen.

I’ll do a lot more camera testing tomorrow (today I’m flying back to San Francisco from New York), but since Samsung is using the exact same cameras on the Galaxy Fold as it does on the Galaxy S10 Plus (and S10 5G), I’m pretty certain we’ll get great quality photos.

However, I’m extremely interested in how the Fold’s shape changes the experience of taking photos out and about. Stay tuned there.

I’m also intrigued by the 8-megapixel depth-sensing camera on the inside, since it’s essentially going to be used for selfies, not for AR experiences in front of you (or else it’d be on the rear). Perhaps if Samsung magically turns on secure face unlock using the depth-sensing camera, this would be one way to open the Fold before unlocking it, and could verify online payments. Until then, the fingerprint reader is fast and easy enough to use open or closed (a little more on that below).

What else? The Galaxy Fold isn’t water-resistantFingerprint reader: Fast and accurate so far. I’m unlocking it with my index finger and my thumb.It has wireless power sharing like the Galaxy S10 phones.It supports Samsung’s DeX dock.
In the box: Galaxy Buds and a case (made of same material as a bullet-proof vest).
Galaxy Fold vs. the Huawei Mate X

Originally published April 15 at 6 a.m. PT.
Update April 16: Adds further observations following second day of use.

Galaxy Fold hands-on: Using Samsung’s foldable phone is a wild ride

P30 Pro outshoots Galaxy S10 Plus: Huawei’s flagship phone has fierce camera skills.

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DoubleTree by Hilton Milwaukee Downtown Wins Two Elite Awards

MILWAUKEE, April 18, 2019 /PRNewswire/ — The DoubleTree by Hilton Milwaukee Downtown has earned two coveted awards from Hilton Worldwide for exceptional hotel performance in 2018. The Pride Award is one of the highest honors awarded to DoubleTree hotels worldwide.

MILWAUKEE, April 18, 2019 /PRNewswire/ — The DoubleTree by Hilton Milwaukee Downtown has earned two coveted awards from Hilton Worldwide for exceptional hotel performance in 2018. The Pride Award is one of the highest honors awarded to DoubleTree hotels worldwide. Additionally, General Manager Jeff Welk received the Leader of the Year Award for his outstanding leadership.

The Pride Award is presented to the top five properties with the highest satisfaction scores in the Americas for overall service, overall experience, helpfulness of staff and cleanliness of the hotel. With newly renovated guest rooms offering an upscale and contemporary design, the hotel continues to be a top choice for travelers in downtown Milwaukee. “Our all-star staff embraces our culture of genuine and sincere hospitality,” said Jeff Welk, General Manager. “Each department works tirelessly each day to maintain our service and cleanliness standards. It truly takes a dedicated and talented team to ensure we are a top choice for our loyal Hilton guests when visiting Milwaukee.”

Mr. Welk was chosen from over 500 General Managers as the winner of the Leader of the Year Award. With over 18 years at the property, Jeff has been an integral part of the hotel’s success since its conversion to a DoubleTree in 2007. “Jeff’s dedication to guest service is truly spectacular,” said Tom Ziarnik, Vice President of Neviaser Investments, the hotel’s management company. “We have been able to lead the brand for many years thanks to Jeff’s dedication and his truly phenomenal customer service.”

Located at 611 West Wisconsin Avenue, the DoubleTree by Hilton Milwaukee Downtown is located near the Fiserv Forum, Marquette University, Milwaukee Public Museum, Wisconsin Center and many more downtown attractions. Featuring brand-new, upscale sleeping rooms, the DoubleTree by Hilton offers each guest award-winning service and Wi-Fi, in additional to ample valet parking and meeting space. The hotel also features the Avenue Bar & Grill, serving delightful American classics and a seasonal outdoor sundeck. The hotel is owned by local investors Dean Fitzgerald and B. Ann Neviaser.

For more information, please visit us at:
http://doubletree3.hilton.com/en/hotels/wisconsin/doubletree-by-hilton-hotel-milwaukee-downtown-MKECCDT/index.html or connect with us on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.

Contact:
Jeff Welk
DoubleTree by Hilton Milwaukee Downtown
414-273-2950
jeff.welk@hilton.com

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Alcatel Avalon V lands at Verizon for $100 – CNET

Chinese smartphone maker TCL on Thursday released the Alcatel Avalon V through Verizon Wireless. The phone is available at Verizon stores for $100 starting Thursday.

Chinese smartphone maker TCL on Thursday released the Alcatel Avalon V through Verizon Wireless. The phone is available at Verizon stores for $100 starting Thursday.

“We’re excited to officially introduce Alcatel-branded smartphones to Verizon Wireless customers for the first time,” Eric Anderson, general manager for TCL, said in a release.

The smartphone comes with a TCL-built 18:9 full-view display, durable Dragontrail glass and a suede finish to make the phone easier to hold. Google Assistant and Google Lens come preinstalled on the phone, and it’s powered by a Qualcomm Snapdragon processor.

Alcatel Avalon V is equipped with a 2460mAh battery, which TCL says can provide 18 hours of 4G LTE talk time, nine hours of video streaming via Wi-Fi or 23 hours of audio streaming in a single charge.

TCL, a Chinese company best known for budget televisions and phones through its BlackBerry Mobile and Alcatel brands, in February showed the company’s working on at least five devices using flexible displays, including two tablets, two smartphones, and a flexible phone that can curve into a smartwatch.


TCL’s DragonHinge lets phones bend and fold
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Galaxy Fold hands-on: Using Samsung’s foldable phone is a wild ride

P30 Pro outshoots Galaxy S10 Plus: Huawei’s flagship phone has fierce camera skills.

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This is Android Q’s quiet killer feature — trust us, you’ll love it – CNET

No more looking for the scrap of paper with your Wi-Fi password. No more hunting for the password on your modem’s label. And no more mistyping it.

No more looking for the scrap of paper with your Wi-Fi password. No more hunting for the password on your modem’s label. And no more mistyping it. In the Android Q version of Google’s mobile OS, you’ll be able to generate a QR code with the credentials of your Wi-Fi network that guests can scan with their phone’s camera to log on. Of all the cool new features I’ve used so far in Android Q, this could be the best.

You could find third-party apps to do this on Android phones, but it could require your entering the credentials as part of the setup. In Android Q, you just tap a button in your Wi-Fi settings to generate a code to share. To scan it, just open up your iPhone or Android camera app and automatically scan the code. And it’s based on the Wi-Fi Alliance’s Wi-Fi Easy Connect standard for sharing network credentials with a QR code.

Now playing:Watch this: The top 5 best Android Q features
2:54

Android Q will also let you add devices — including smart home and internet of things devices — to the Wi-Fi network you manage via a QR code on a sticker or display you scan with your Android camera app. The device needs to support the Easy Connect Wi-Fi standard for this to work.

To create a QR code for a Wi-Fi network

In Android Q, here’s how to share your Wi-Fi credentials via a QR code.

Head to Settings, then Network & internet, then your Wi-Fi network’s name and tap the gear to the right of your network.

In the Network details window, tap the blue Share button on the right.

Enter your passcode to generate a QR code with the Wi-Fi name and password.

There doesn’t seem to be a way to save the QR code, so you’ll need to regenerate it each time you use it.

To scan a QR code to join a network

On Android, you can choose “Add network” at the bottom of Wi-Fi settings to scan a QR code. What’s easier, however, is that the Camera app can scan QR codes once you turn on Lens.

Open Android’s Camera app.

If you haven’t used Lens yet, in the camera settings that run across the bottom, tap More.

Tap Lens, and then tap “Turn on camera” to use Lens.

Now, position the Camera viewfinder over the QR code and tap the code.

When the name of the network appears below the QR code, tap it to join the Wi-FI network.


Android Q beta: Here’s what you can look forward to
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On an iPhone ($1,000 at Amazon) and iPad ($280 at Amazon) running iOS 11, it’s even easier:

Open the iOS Camera app.

Position the Camera app’s viewfinder over the QR code. When the camera recognizes the QR code, it shows a notification.

Tap the notification to join the Wi-Fi network.

Either on iPhone or Android, after you tap the notification, you’re on the Wi-Fi network, without typing a password.

Originally published April 16.
Update, April 18: Expands intro.

How to set up Google’s two-step verification: With a few minutes of setup time, your account will be much more secure.

How to book an Uber or Lyft with Google Home: Use a Google Home and your phone to get the best ride.

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Moto G6 available for $99 on Google Fi right now – CNET

For a limited time, Google’s mobile network Google Fiis selling the Motorola Moto G6 for $99 — that’s $150 cheaper than its retail price of $249. As premium phones get more and more expensive (like the $1,000 iPhone XS Max or the $2,000 Galaxy Fold), it’s important that affordable, midrange phones are available for other users who don’t have much to spend.

For a limited time, Google’s mobile network Google Fiis selling the Motorola Moto G6 for $99 — that’s $150 cheaper than its retail price of $249. As premium phones get more and more expensive (like the $1,000 iPhone XS Max or the $2,000 Galaxy Fold), it’s important that affordable, midrange phones are available for other users who don’t have much to spend. When the Moto G6 launched in 2018, it was one of CNET’s favorite budget phones. In his CNET review Patrick Holland said it was “a sublime value” with minimal drawbacks.

Now playing:Watch this: Motorola Moto G6 and G6 Play review
3:20

The phone is available on Google’s Wi-Fi first network, which uses local Wi-Fi networks first (the same kind you set up at home, or connect to at a coffee shop or airport) to patch calls, send texts and browse the internet. If Wi-Fi coverage is not available or too weak, the network will then switch to US carriers T-Mobile’s, Sprint’s or US Cellular’s networks. Since November 2018, the service expanded to include service Samsung, OnePlus and iPhone (in beta) phones.

Earlier this month, Motorola released the successor to the Moto G6, aptly named the Moto G7. The G7 has a larger display, a faster processor and more memory compared to the G6. However, at $299, it’s more expensive than the G6 when it first launched and now even more so with this promotion. If you’re looking for a reliable phone for cheap and you’re on Google Fi, consider the G6.

Editors’ note April 18: Updated with correct price in headline.


The Moto G6 is ready for its close-up
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Smart home sale at Amazon: limited-time savings on August smart locks

If you’ve wanted to beef up your home security, now is a great time with this
offer from August. Amazon has the August Smart Lock Pro and Connect on sale for $211.50.

If you’ve wanted to beef up your home security, now is a great time with this
offer from August. Amazon has the August Smart Lock Pro and Connect on sale for $211.50. That’s a $68 discount and the best price we’ve found for the smart home device.

The Smart Lock Pro can be installed in minutes and attaches to your deadbolt on the inside of your door. You can download the compatible August app to control and monitor your smart lock from anywhere. You’ll be able to grant keyless access to family and friends, lock and unlock your door, and keep track of who’s coming and going all remotely with your smartphone. The August lock will even automatically unlock and lock when your coming and going so you never have to hassle with finding your keys. The August Pro includes the Connect Wifi Bridge which allows for voice control and is compatible with Amazon Alexa, Siri, and the Google Assistant.

This is the perfect time to secure your home and snag a fantastic deal, so make sure to take advantage of this stellar sale while you can.

Amazon also has the August Smart lock with Connect on sale for $179. The August lock has all the features of the of the Pro, thanks to the Connect Wifi Bridge, but does lack smart home integrations with Apple HomeKit and Z-Wave Plus.

You can find more home security sales with the best cheap home security camera deals that are currently available.

You can also shop more smart home deals with the best cheap smart home devices and gadget deals.

HP unveils its first 15-inch Chromebook laptop, starts at $449 – CNET

HP has announced its biggest Chromebook laptop to date, which features a 15-inch touchscreen display and full-sized keyboard and number pad. The company joins Acer, Asus and Lenovo, all of which unveiled 15-inch laptops running Google’sChrome operating system during the past two years.

HP has announced its biggest Chromebook laptop to date, which features a 15-inch touchscreen display and full-sized keyboard and number pad. The company joins Acer, Asus and Lenovo, all of which unveiled 15-inch laptops running Google’sChrome operating system during the past two years.

Read: CNET’s best Chromebooks for 2019

The HP Chromebook 15 starts at $449 and comes equipped with fairly typical 2019 Chromebook components: an Intel Pentium Gold 4417U CPU, 4GB of DDR4 SDRAM and 64GB of eMMC storage. In addition to its 15.6-inch FHD IPS touchscreen, it also has a backlit keyboard and number pad, B&O dual speakers and an HD webcam.

In some ways, the new HP Chromebook 15 is the laptop version of the company’s convertible Chromebook x2 that debuted in 2018. Starting at $599, the x2 Chromebook has comparable components — including a slightly more powerful Intel Core m3-7Y30, 4GB of inferior DDR3 RAM and a tiny 32GB hard drive — and some of the same features. But where the x2 features a detachable display, which works nicely as a standalone tablet, the Chromebook 15’s display is permanently secured to the keyboard.

CNET Review
HP Chromebook x2The x2 strikes a nearly perfect balance between laptop and tablet — at a Chromebook price.Read Review

$539.99at HP

The HP Chromebook 15 starts at $449. An email from HP said that it is available now, though it’s currently listed as “Coming Soon” on the company’s website.

HP Chromebook 15 specs15.6-inch FHD IPS BrightView WLED-backlit touchscreen (1,920×1,080-pixel resolution)Intel Pentium Gold 4417U CPU4GB of DDR4 SDRAM64GB of eMMC storageIntegrated Intel HD Graphics 610B&O dual speakersIntel 802.11ac WiFiBluetooth 4.2HD camera with dual micsMicroSD card reader, 2 x USB 3.1 (Type C), USB 3.1 (Type A) portBacklit keyboard with number padRated up to 13 hours of battery lifeCloud Blue or Mineral Silver finishWeighs 4.0 lbs.Starts at $449

Everything Apple announced: What we know about Apple’s TV content and service, credit card, game subscription service and more.

Apple TV Channel’s streaming service is here: Get ready for another way to watch your shows in an already crowded battle for your views.

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Reolink Launches Final April Boom on Smart Cameras to Celebrate Easter 2019

HONG KONG, April 18, 2019 /PRNewswire/ — Reolink announces incredible discounts (up to 25 percent off) on top-selling smart home security cameras & systems to celebrate the upcoming Easter, giving consumers the maximum opportunity to benefit from a range of offers.

HONG KONG, April 18, 2019 /PRNewswire/ — Reolink announces incredible discounts (up to 25 percent off) on top-selling smart home security cameras & systems to celebrate the upcoming Easter, giving consumers the maximum opportunity to benefit from a range of offers.

Shoppers can view the best security camera Easter deals 2019 here: https://reolink.com/flash-sale.

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Note: Reolink Easter sales are time-limited. The deals will end on April 22.

Big Features, Little Prices: Get Reolink Security Camera Hero Deals

Consumers can now have a safe Easter and make egg hunts easier by putting up security cameras to keep tabs on their properties.

Reolink Flagship — Battery Powered Security Camera Lineup

25 percent off on Reolink Keen™: Reolink’s first wire-free security camera, capable of rotating in all directions with its pan/tilt function Up to 15 percent off on Reolink Argus® 2 & Argus Pro: Reolink’s first rechargeable battery or solar powered security cameras 10 percent off on Reolink Go: The most versatile 4G LTE security camera that works even without Internet or power supply

Enjoy 10 percent off on Reolink PoE and Wi-Fi Security Cameras & Systems

Please check the below chart for the full range of live deals on Reolink PoE and WiFi standalone IP cameras and all-in-one security systems.

Product

Current Pricing

Ratings

RLC-410 5MP PoE bullet camera

$53.99

4.82 out of 5 stars

RLC-420 5MP PoE dome camera

$53.99

4.94 out of 5 stars

RLC-511 PoE 4X optical camera

$94.49

Amazon’s Choice

RLC-410W dual-band WiFi cam

$58.49

4 out of 5 stars

C1 Pro 4MP WiFi indoor PT cam

$69.29

4.9 out of 5 stars

Reolink PoE security system

Start from $359.99

4.83 out of 5 stars

Reolink WiFi security system

$296.99

5 out of 5 stars

Get an up-to-date list of the best Reolink Easter deals and the newest sales for 2019 at its official online store.

About Reolink

Reolink, a global innovator in the smart home field, is always dedicated to delivering the easiest and most reliable security solutions for home and business. Reolink’s mission is to make security a seamless experience for customers with its groundbreaking security products. Reolink products are available and sold worldwide, providing video surveillance and protection for millions of homes and families.

For more information about Reolink and its products, please visit https://reolink.com.

Contact

Elvia Poon/PR manager
Email: pr@reolink.com
Address: RM.4B, Kingswell Commercial Tower, 171-173 Lockhart Road, Wan Chai, Hong Kong
Reolink Innovation Limited

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